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  1. #1
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    Anyone use platform pedals when it is cold out?

    Ready to give up on riding clipless in the winter, I really don't feel riding platforms would be a big deal for the winter. Have done it before and was fine.

    What shoes are those of you doing this wearing? Something insulated with a stiff sole seems it would be best.

  2. #2
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Yes.
    In fact, I found out that I like flat pedals (pinned BMX on my commuter) and started removing my clicky pedals from the rest of my bikes, although they aren`t all the same kind of no-clicks. I still have Candies on a tandem and occasionally use them on my mtb if I expect a lot of bumpy terrain.

    My shoe choice depends on the weather.
    Recalculating....

  3. #3
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    I'm riding platforms on my commuter. I using trail running shoes or chuck's now, but as it gets colder I'll switch over to some boots.

  4. #4
    canuck
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    yup flats is the way to go. I just hauled a shop vac, 75' hose and misc other items from home depot and clipped in wouldn't do me any favors.

    I wear gortex merrels to keep my feet dry here in Wa. and if its really coming down some showers pass boot covers do the job !

  5. #5
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    I use platforms all year 'round. Twenty6 PreRunners.
    -Greg
    Lynskey Ridgeline 29-SL, Truvativ Hammerschmidt, Cannondale Lefty 29er SL w/ DLR (Project321 adaptor). 26 lbs.

  6. #6
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    I'm gonna try flats this winter, I switched to them (Deity pedals) for trailriding last spring, and look forward to wearing some warmer boots with them. I got some insulated Keens, look warm, but not as bulky as Sorels, and with a real sole. I tried to avoid big lugs though as a flatter sole grips better on the pins. I'm interested to see how they work out on the icy uphills and how that much metal underfoot affects my foot warmth. Unlike winter bike shoes, if they don't work out for riding I know I can use them for shoveling, snowshoeing etc.

  7. #7
    RebelYell
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    best shoes for flats are Vans....

  8. #8
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    i've always been flats only during winter.
    iced cleats and a schoolbus slewing sideways... you know.
    just my experience, not suggesting, but that's my reasoning.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I haven't used clipless pedals on my commuter bike in seven years. So yeah, I use flat pedals in the winter. I use them with toe clips. I like it that I can adjust the strap to make the clips fit anything from a pair of sneakers with very skinny soles to a pair of work boots or even my gore-tex hikers.

    If we get snow at the elevations where I ride my mountain bike this winter, I'll probably put flats on that too, so I can ride in my hikers. I'd rather be wearing something water proof if I'm going to be dabbing into a snow bank.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
    bi-winning
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    Yep, I used flats last winter. It worked just fine for my 10km commute. I just used the winter boots I already owned, nothing special.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  11. #11
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Coincidentally, I logged into mtbr to ask a very similar question! I've been riding clipless for the last five years and always turned my nose up at platforms. However, I recently broke one of my clipless shoes and have been using a set of vintage xt platforms. Surprisingly, I really like the freedom to move my feet around the pedal and the ability to jump off and run into a store without clicking and clacking all over the place. Now, I can't decide if I should buy new set of shoes or switch it up to all platform all the time? I'm most concerned with the rain and having to buy a new set of booties to cover my sneakers and keep my feet dry. Anyone go from clipless to platforms and not look back?

  12. #12
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    hrmm?
    nothing behind me, why look back? :P

    it was riding on ice that did it for me, i could soft pedal with my foot only half-on the flats, gave me the shortest movement needed to get my boots on the ground.
    then back to mid-pedal for power fun time.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  13. #13
    weirdo
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    Sizzler, I`m surprised that you haven`t been on platforms since you went back to flat bars and headed for the Big Apples! They just all seem to fit together!

    Seriously though, all the types of pedals have their own plusses and minuses. For the stop and go trips around town, there`s no way I want to deal with toe clips or PowerGrips, so for me that one has to be either clickies or naked platforms. And since I value being able to wear any shoes or boots when I ride, my choice is obvious. No looking back there.

    I went from clickies to clips and straps on my road bike because the little tiny pedals hurt my feet on longer rides. That one could probably be cured with better shoes, but I`m not positive about that and it would be expensive to find out. I do miss the super positive grab of cleats on my roadie a bit, but the clips and straps do the job well enough that I`m not going to shell out big money for anything else. I guess you could say I`m looking back, but not turning around.

    I already said above that I like my Candies on rocky roads- straps probably come close to keeping feet from bouncing off the pedals, but I don`t trust my ability to get out of them as well as I do for the clickes and the clickies are definitely easier to get into than toe clips. On most mtb rides, I`m done before my feet hurt (don`t understand why mtbing hurts everything less than road riding), but sometimes I get to feeling like the balls of my feet have been subject to a beating even on the trail. Also, I want warmer feet than what my Shimano shoes offer me sometimes. I`m on the fence as far as clickies go for mtb.

    I`m keeping Candies on the tandem. Like a fixie, if you lose the pedals on a tandem, you`re in trouble. And since I usually have my hands full starting and stopping anyway, I don`t want anything extra to worry about in the feet department. So, no toe clips for me while I`m trying to get that big awkward beast rolling in a straight line from a stop light, thank you. Clickies there.
    Recalculating....

  14. #14
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Sizzler, I`m surprised that you haven`t been on platforms since you went back to flat bars and headed for the Big Apples! They just all seem to fit together!
    Yes, in fact it's known as the trifecta, and when all three elements are in perfect alignment the commuter will achieve total consciousness, so I got that going for me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anyone use platform pedals when it is cold out?-trifecta.jpg  


  15. #15
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    ^^^
    I saw this on my phone, without the picture, and was afraid you might have done it to that nice Burley you bought.

    Not that I wouldn't use one of my racers as a fair-weather commuter if I had a place to keep it (and a place to leave some shoes.)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    I commute and tour on platforms in all weather conditions. My commute is relatively short and flat, so the convenience and comfort of platforms tends to outweigh any potential benefit of clipless pedals. Also, my cycling philosophy is such that I don't think anyone should feel compelled to wear special clothing (aside from a helmet, of course) to ride a bike for such a utilitarian purpose as commuting.

  17. #17
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Quote Originally Posted by datalore
    My commute is relatively short and flat.
    I didn't realize you could commute on the Enterprise. Do you ride in the Jeffries Tubes?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    I didn't realize you could commute on the Enterprise. Do you ride in the Jeffries Tubes?
    I try to draft the Borg. For them, wind resistance is futile.

  19. #19
    The Brutally Handsome
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    I bet the holodeck has some pretty sweet trail programs.

  20. #20
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    i commute in bismarck, ND and use Eastern plastic pedals, i would recommend platforms to everyone

  21. #21
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny K
    Ready to give up on riding clipless in the winter, I really don't feel riding platforms would be a big deal for the winter. Have done it before and was fine.

    What shoes are those of you doing this wearing? Something insulated with a stiff sole seems it would be best.
    I'm a dedicated clipless rider on the road and mounatin bikes, but for commuting I've always gone with flat pedals. I think my commute would have to be really long (like 10 miles or so) for me to want to bother dragging my shoes to work and changing them.

    I find a big flat pedal with just about any shoe works fine. Heavy boots can feel a little cumbersome, not being able to move my ankle that much.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  22. #22
    living in forever land
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    Coincidentally, I logged into mtbr to ask a very similar question! I've been riding clipless for the last five years and always turned my nose up at platforms. However, I recently broke one of my clipless shoes and have been using a set of vintage xt platforms. Surprisingly, I really like the freedom to move my feet around the pedal and the ability to jump off and run into a store without clicking and clacking all over the place. Now, I can't decide if I should buy new set of shoes or switch it up to all platform all the time? I'm most concerned with the rain and having to buy a new set of booties to cover my sneakers and keep my feet dry. Anyone go from clipless to platforms and not look back?
    i'm finding this a problem aswell; i use platforms on my MTB but, used to use clipless on my commuter bike. having just got another commuter its come with platforms, riding back home felt great. your right it is nice to just get off the bike and be able to walk places. whenever i go for a ride i need to get off at some point and take some photos or something.

    i use tennis shoes, i find there sole to be bendy enough to grip the platforms, but, hard enough to last a very long time
    "the sanctity of this agency requires the loss of a few personal freedoms...."

  23. #23
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    I just recently switched to Clipless from Platforms on my MTB/Commuter. It was more because I broke my Platforms and didn't have the $$ to get new pedals. I just borrowed my road bike pedals. I have a nice set of shoes and walking in them isn't that bad. It's a bit more work to take them off and on but I like it. Plus, I'm kind of using my commuting in the winter to train up a bit for my roadie expeditions this summer. I'd much rather have platforms when things get hairy though.

    I'm probably goign to get some Platform/SPD pedals when I get a Chance. Then I can do both.

  24. #24
    Did I catch a niner?
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    Powergrips are what I prefer, give that clipless pedal effectiveness but can get out easy enough. I don't think clipless are very safe in the urban jungle with random ice patches everywhere and 2 ton coffins all around.

    I put some bmx platform pedals on this bike in the summer when others use it.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?
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  25. #25
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    I've been using the Shimano M324 dual pedals to get the best of both worlds.

    Shimano M324

    I can ride clipless on nice weather days when I want to keep up a good pace or go for a long ride on the way home. When it snows or rains, I can throw my work boots on and ride on the flats. They have been durable, were comfortable enough for a century.

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