Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    10

    Any opinions on the forge m street?

    I'm wanting to get into biking and I'm trying to find out what would suit me best. I was just about ready to pull the trigger on the Forge sawback 5xx (which has plenty of great reviews) but when I showed it to my GF she brought up some valid points. 99% of my riding would be on bike paths and some roads on the way to work, even the "rougher" trials that we have around the lake are very good hardpack. She thought the the sawback would be slower and more work for what I need for trail riding. So I started looking at a more hybrid/road bike and came across the m street. From what I tell it seems like a great deal, but the only reviews that I can find of it are passing comments and no pictures but the low res stock photos. I dont know enough to know whether the components are worth any either. Does anyone have any opinions on this bike or it's components?


    Frameset
    Size: 19" FRAME / STANDOVER HEIGHT 30.8"
    Color: ALLEY BLACK
    Frame: 6061 ALL ALUMINUM WITH RACK AND FENDER MOUNTS
    Fork: RIGID CROMOLY STEER TUBE & LEG
    Wheels
    Rims: ALLOY 36H 700CX36H
    Hubs: JOYTECH 36H ALLOY
    Spokes: 14G STAINLESS STEEL
    Tires: KENDA K125 700X32C
    Drivetrain
    Speed: 21
    Shifters: SHIMANO ST-EF50 (BRAKE AND SHIFT)
    Front Derailleur: SHIMANO FD-M190
    Rear Derailleur: SHIMANO RD-TX51
    Crankset: SR XCC-T102 42/34/24T
    Bottom Bracket: SR SEALED CARTRIDGE
    Freewheel: SHIMANO MF-TZ37
    Chain: KMC Z51RB
    Pedals: DUAL DENSITY PLATFORM
    Components
    Saddle: WTB SPEED V SPORT
    Seat Post: ALLOY 30.8X350MM WITH QUICK RELEASE
    Handlebar: HL 154 600MM 15D 40MM RISE
    Stem: ALLOY THREADLESS ADJUSTABLE
    Grips: WTB SPORT
    Brake Set: TEKTRO ALLOY LINEAR-PULL WITH SHIMANO INTEGRATED SHIFT BRAKE LEVERS

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    46
    How much riding are you planning on doing? The components on that bike are pretty much the lowest of the low... probably not worth your money if you're going to ride it more than a couple times a year.

    With component spec, don't go much lower than Shimano Deore or Tiagra/Acera, because at this point you're getting durable items without really sacrificing mechanical precision(the shifters will often just be 'rapidfire' series which is fine). Take a look at the offerings at bikesdirect.com, etc. For around $400, you should be able to get a very serviceable bike. Trek has the 7.2 or 7.3 FX on the lower end. Also, Giant has a superb hybrid line, and their component spec is very very good, as the 'Giant' brand components are fantastic, and they can outprice a lot of other manufacturers.

    'Hybrid' bikes are becoming fairly popular(for good reason), so you have lots of options now... I used to have a Trek 7.3 FX which was absolutely wonderful - aside from chain/cable lubing, the only maintenance it needed in 3,400 miles was tightening of the bottom bracket, and rear wheel truing, and it had Shimano 'rapidfire' shifters, and Deore derailleur.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    10
    I'd like to eventually do a lot of riding i guess.The components are really that low? I guess you get what you pay for! I was thinking about a trek fx of some sort or a specialized crosstrail, but the forge is enough cheaper that I figured I might be able to a start on it

  4. #4
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5,731
    Hey, Josh. I don`t know what the bikes you`re looking at are like, but if the Sawback is a heavy duty suspension bike, I`m guessing I`d tell you the same thing your girlfriend said. As long as you don`t have one of those mega commutes, pretty much any bike will work, but I (and most of us here, I think) prefer not to deal with the extra weight and complications of suspension for mostly street use. Of course, if you want to use te same bike on the weekends for rocky trails, you`ll have to weigh out the pros and cons and come up with the best compromise.

    What kind of "a lot of riding" do you plan to do? Do you have a bike now? You might be best served by an old rigid (no suspension) mountain bike if you don`t know yet- they`re about the most versitile bikes imaginable, for mixed use. Down the road, if you find yourself doing a lot of long road rides, or gnarly downhills, or some kind of racing, you could always put together a bike more suited to a specific purpose. Or you might just find that you like the bike you`ve got

    By the way, used bikes are always my suggestion for anybody on a tight budget. I have heard good things about Bikes Direct, though- I think the biggest complaint against them is that it`s a blind purchase, so you have to make sure you understand what you`re getting and don`t have the benefit of comparing and testing out the various models they sell.
    Recalculating....

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,917
    I actually really hate hybrids. I think that on the road they feel like a mountain bike and on a trail they have the traction of a road bike.

    I found my commuter on Craig's List for $100 and while it's taken some work, it hasn't been $130 worth of work, and I'm quite happy with it now. If you don't know bikes well enough to evaluate something on CL, phone some of your local bike shops and see if anyone carries used bikes. My city supports a couple of used bike shops.

    While it's possible to ride road bikes on gravel and hardpack, it does take a little finesse. So if it's been a while since you rode a bike regularly and you are going to be on those surfaces, you might start with a rigid mountain bike. It won't really be any worse than the M street on the road, and you should get much more component for your dollar buying used. Otherwise, I think the best bikes for riding on the road are traditional road bikes. A little fatter tire is nice for commuting. I like 25mm, but 28mm is maybe more popular for the purpose.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    10
    I come from a mtb bike background, so I have a hard time wrapping my head around a full fledged road bike, plus I haven't found any anywhere close to my price range. Really the majority of use that it'll get is plodding away on bike trails. You can get almost anywhere in my county on a bike trail. I really want to get into shape, so besides the shot jaunt to work and back everyday, I want to start going on longish rides (20+ miles) so I think a mtb wouldn't work great. I;m thinking that I am going to get a 7.1 fx or a 7.2 depending on price.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    46
    Josh - you might like the hybrid, because many of them come with a riser bar, and have more relaxed geometry for more comfort than your typical road bike. Yes, a hybrid is a compromise, but with the 700c wheels, you will roll MUCH faster than with a 26" wheeled mountain bike. The other thing is, you'll be able to run road tires, wider 'hybrid' ties(between 28 and 34mm), or even knobby cyclocross tires. For a bike to get in shape with, that will get you places quickly and efficiently, you can't do better. And hell, I even rode my Trek 7.3 FX all the way across the country.

    I too have a mountain bike background, and the fit/handling of the Trek FX series is excellent. Plus, in the store, they'll swap the Bontrager stems/bars to get you comfortable. The 7.1 FX is a great deal, and the Trek warranty is a major plus. But first things first - go ride the thing and see what you think.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,917
    For me, fitness riding or riding for over an hour increase my distaste for hybrids. And mountain bikes with slicks, for that matter. I don't think anything beats a properly fit road bike for long-ride or high-intensity comfort.

    Nobody has to agree with me, of course. I just think you (OP) should hop on a road bike while you're experimenting with different types. And don't just sit on each bike - ride for a while, open the throttle - put yourself through your paces on each type, and see what you think. A used shop should have several different kinds of bike on the floor if $230 is your budget and you don't want to know what you're missing with a more recent road bike (it's not much, if you're not racing and don't go all the way to the bottom of the barrel with used.)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
    Truly Doneski
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    541
    I have to agree with Andrew on this one. Hybrids are a jack of all trades, and a master of none.

    My first bike was a Gary Fisher hybrid. I rode the bike a bunch, mostly on the road/bike paths etc. The bike was a pretty nice bike, but it's just designed in a weird sort of middling place between mountain and road bike.

    As I became a more competitive and faster rider, the riding position of the hybrid really started to bother me. You ride very upright in the typical hybrid, which isn't great for going fast, but is good for comfort.

    If you have a small budget and some interest in riding off road, I would really encourage you to look into a fully rigid mountainbike. You can always have a spare set of tires for off road use and run slick tires on the MTB.

    If you really have little interest in off road riding and you think you'll be spending most of your time on bike paths etc, get a road bike. A Road bike is going to be very comfortable, and it's going to absolutely haul compared to hyrbids or MTB's.

    Really, the best thing that you could do is just quit listening to all us keyboard jockeys and go to your LBS, where you can try road bikes, fully rigid mtb's, hybrids, whatever. Hopefully you'll find something you think is especially comfortable and well suited for you.

    I'd really just try to find a bike that is purpose built for something very specific. Hybrids just try to do too much at once and end up sacrificing performance in the process.
    Originally Posted by Bmateo1:
    Joyous Day in Woods
    Thoughtless Jackwagon, piss near
    Chudzpah, Passion Lost

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    46
    Agreed, go ride some bikes.

    But we're forgetting his budget, guys - road bikes will cost quite a bit more than a hybrid... just saying.

    But anyway, go ride some bikes

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    10
    thanks for all of the info guys. I'm not considering the forge anymore, I realize that I need to spend more money for something good. I'm still considering a hybrid ( a Trek 7.2 fx, GF Bodega, Giant Escape 2, or a specialized crosstrail sport), I thought about getting a "road" bike, but I think that just the term must make them cost more. The trek 1.1 for instance seems to have lower components than hybrids that cost $100's less. It's too icy still to test bikes, but I have been going to different LBS's and getting hands on with different bikes. thanks again for all of the suggestions

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    46
    Good luck, and have fun!

  13. #13
    Truly Doneski
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    541
    If I truly wanted a "Do it all" bike like a hybrid is supposed to be, I'd get a cross bike. They're pretty pricey though.

    Look at fully rigid 29'ers. They`can be very cheap. SE Stout comes to mind, though I think that they're singlespeeds.
    Originally Posted by Bmateo1:
    Joyous Day in Woods
    Thoughtless Jackwagon, piss near
    Chudzpah, Passion Lost

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    502
    I own the Sawback and the M Street, honestly the M Street blew me away with its quality and frame. I have lots of miles on the Sawback and wanted a road commute bike. How do I use it, I ride short commute rides and attached a rack, to-date probabaly have 2k miles on it and never had to replace anything. The components are not low of the low as referenced. Actually the shifters are the same as the FX 7.1, brakes, tires, rims, fork. So if you compare the Trek 7.1 FX at $449 vs the Forge M Street at $229. I would go with the Forge M Street. I also like the adjustable threadless stem option on the M Street - so I can ride more upright. Big difference in price but not that big of a difference in the components.

    But you made a good descision, personally I like the Giant Escape over the Trek FX. So if you get the Trek I would at least get the Trek 7.5 FX at $979.00. Otherwise I don't see the value of the lower FX models.

    Let us know which one you decide on... Send a pic!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •