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  1. #1
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    Aftermarket chain guards?

    I'm slowly converting my hardtail into my full-time duty commuter. One of the add-ons I'd like is something to keep my chainrings from chewing up my pants
    I was wondering if aftermarket chain guards are available for MTBs, and if they are easy to attach. I've found that Hebie makes some (and Cannondale specs them on their urban bikes), but the site is in German and I can't figure out if the attachment method involves special hardware or if they just clip on or something.

    'appreciate inputs from anyone who's ever tried them.

    TIA
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  2. #2
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    It's hard to find something like this:



    that doesn't interfere w/ front derailer.

    There are a variety of chain guards for single ring or, best of all, single ring/single cog setups, but adding derailers complicates things. The very best chainguard I've seen is full-enclosure one on my wife's breezer. The Trek L200 had something similar.

    My son's 16" bike had something like on the picture above and it really protected the chain too as well as his pants, 2 school years of bad weather abuse and never had to oil the chain. His 20" bike has one of these things and 3 months into the school year his setup is getting creaky.

  3. #3
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rigel
    I'm slowly converting my hardtail into my full-time duty commuter. One of the add-ons I'd like is something to keep my chainrings from chewing up my pants
    I was wondering if aftermarket chain guards are available for MTBs, and if they are easy to attach. I've found that Hebie makes some (and Cannondale specs them on their urban bikes), but the site is in German and I can't figure out if the attachment method involves special hardware or if they just clip on or something.

    'appreciate inputs from anyone who's ever tried them.

    TIA
    Man, I have been struggling with this very issue for a while for the wife's cruiser. It was a 3x7 setup. First thing I realized was that I could not find a usable aftermarket chain guard anywhere. What I did was take one of an old junked criuser that looked like it could fit with some creative rigging. It looks a lot like the gold one pictured in the post above. Next I realized this was never going to work with a front deraileur, so that had to go, and now the bike is a 1x7. Then I found that the raised mounts for the small ring on the crank interfered with the mounting bracket you see in the picture, so I had to saw the raised mounts off the crank. It then took a lot of d!cking around to get the thing to mount in a way that looked decent, as this is a pretty sweet liking bike. I now need to sand and paint the guard and all the hardware black and then I'll mount it up.

    For my own less aesthetically sensitive commuter bike, I have a couple of small plastic chain guards that look like the bottom of a field hockey stick (J shaped) that are about a foot long with no mounting brackets or hardware of any sort. I am going to get one of them rigged up to do the job, even it it does not look too good. If you are interested, PM me and I'll send you the extra one once I figure out how to do this and know for sure that I won't need it.

    It seems like no matter what, if your bike was not designed with one of these, it is going to be a bit of work to get one to fit.

    Otherwise, a velcro tie around the ankle seems to work pretty well.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the replies.

    The translated webpage for the Hebie site (http://209.85.171.104/translate_c?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.hebie.de/Kettenschutz-368.hebie368.0.html&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dhebie%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-USfficial%26hs%3DdSg&usg=ALkJrhhGE_Ey71HJe_tVLumWJ2ENuIqOmw) shows the 360 & 368 are for front der../triple chainring setups.
    Considering how difficult it might be to find Hebie, I was wondering if there are other brands that make something similar.

    kapusta, it'd be great if you could post pics of the setup you described. TIA
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=rigel]Thanks for the replies.

    The translated webpage for the Hebie site ([URL="http://209.85.171.104/translate_ shows the 360 & 368 are for front der../triple chainring setups.
    Considering how difficult it might be to find Hebie, I was wondering if there are other brands that make something similar.[/QUOTE]

    I found another company that made something similar (I think SKS) but they were not available in the US.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    I found another company that made something similar (I think SKS) but they were not available in the US.
    Hey, good find! Exactly what I'm looking for.

    SKS Germany has pretty good distributorship (is that the right word?) where I'm from (The Philippines). I'll have to make it a point to visit at least one bike shop I know that has a pretty good line-up of SKS products.
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  7. #7
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    The mounting holes make it look like it requires the tabs that are around the bottom bracket on some frames. Mostly all-mountain and freeride type bikes. I would look carefully into how this attaches before ordering.

    Here's a pic of the tabs from the Hammershmidt review on this site.


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweezak
    The mounting holes make it look like it requires the tabs that are around the bottom bracket on some frames. Mostly all-mountain and freeride type bikes. I would look carefully into how this attaches before ordering.

    Here's a pic of the tabs from the Hammershmidt review on this site.

    Not likely. Those are ISCG tabs you've mentioned. They're for bash-guard/chainguard set-ups on FR/DH bikes.

    The chainguards by SKS are for trekking/commuting bikes and the mounting system is likely just a plate that is sandwiched in the BB-crank area.
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rigel
    ...

    The chainguards by SKS are for trekking/commuting bikes and the mounting system is likely just a plate that is sandwiched in the BB-crank area.
    I always wondered if the added width of that plate sandwiched between BB and crank could screw up the chain line?

  10. #10
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    I really don't see how those German chain guards are going to work with a front derailleur? A simple bash guard like device works well as a pants guard. Unfortunately they only come up to 36t because that is about the limit that the DH/Freeride segment needs. I use a Schlumpf drive on my Townie with an outer ring and it works very well. It would be great for someone to come up with a simple clear plastic one for larger chainwheels. Or maybe even one that is reflective!
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MABman
    I really don't see how those German chain guards are going to work with a front derailleur? A simple bash guard like device works well as a pants guard. Unfortunately they only come up to 36t because that is about the limit that the DH/Freeride segment needs. I use a Schlumpf drive on my Townie with an outer ring and it works very well. It would be great for someone to come up with a simple clear plastic one for larger chainwheels. Or maybe even one that is reflective!
    I don't think you can use that SKS with a front derailleur.

    I've got a bash guard that has worked pretty well for keeping my pants from getting caught, but I'm interested in the chain guard to keep my pants clean from chain grease.

    If you want a bigger bash guard, look at the BBG guards.
    http://www.bbgbashguard.com/Mountainbike.html
    They've got up to 44t (maybe bigger) and they are really inexpensive.

    Been looking into the SKS thing again now, and it looks like they may be available in the US, after all.

  12. #12
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    Salsa makes some rings up to 44T also.

    http://www.salsacycles.com/chainrings.html

    As far as grease from the chain on your pants...I'd just use a velcro pant strap.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweezak
    Salsa makes some rings up to 44T also.

    http://www.salsacycles.com/chainrings.html

    As far as grease from the chain on your pants...I'd just use a velcro pant strap.
    Those other bashguards are really cool with all that selection and even colors! Nice. The old Salsa brand delivers also.

    I have never gotten chain spooge on my pants just using a bash type guard personally, even without an ankle strap. However I was just talking with a bike clothing design specialist the other day and we talked about what could be done like having a strap built in somehow or just making the pants tighter at the cuff. Enough people are getting on board so that soon you will see more sensible clothing with the features necessary for commuting via bike.

    What I need to carry with me more is a pair of disposable rubber gloves so that any roadside repairs can be carried out without getting my fingers all black.....note to self.
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  14. #14
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    As fate would have it a local listing provided this picture of a chainguard installed in conjunction with a front derailleur. Not a good shot of how it actually works out but it looks like the guard is just plenty big enough to accomodate the movement of the der.?P1020762.jpg

    And from another altogether more minimalist angle,
    Black_Sheep_36er_CS.jpg
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  15. #15
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    Minimalist my as s, that's a Ti chain guard on a Ti bike. That's sweeeeeeeeeeeet!

    Quote Originally Posted by MABman
    And from another altogether more minimalist angle,
    Black_Sheep_36er_CS.jpg
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MABman
    As fate would have it a local listing provided this picture of a chainguard installed in conjunction with a front derailleur. Not a good shot of how it actually works out but it looks like the guard is just plenty big enough to accomodate the movement of the der.?P1020762.jpg

    And from another altogether more minimalist angle,
    Black_Sheep_36er_CS.jpg
    Ooooh, Batavus... those things are pricey... and heavy.

    That ti job is sexy!
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rigel
    Ooooh, Batavus... those things are pricey... and heavy.

    That ti job is sexy!
    I thought the carbon fork, chainstays and faux effect on the fenders on the Batavus were a bit over the top personally. I'll bet the guy doesn't get what he is asking for it around here. I might bird dog it though and see if he comes down to earth at some point and nullify the heavy aspect by outfitting it with a motor assist.......

    The ti job, although it recently won accolades at the Rocky Mtn. Bike Show, is not as sexy in the whole IMNSHO.
    Black_Sheep_36er.jpg

    36" wheels just don't speak to me in that way I guess.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MABman
    The ti job, although it recently won accolades at the Rocky Mtn. Bike Show, is not as sexy in the whole IMNSHO.
    Black_Sheep_36er.jpg

    36" wheels just don't speak to me in that way I guess.
    Yikes, 36-inchers! Freaky!
    And as that Sesame Street song goes: "...that's about the size, where you put your eyes..."
    (talking 'bout perspective)
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  19. #19
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    check out Hebie.com They make one. I am thinking of trying one

  20. #20
    No, that's not phonetic
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    I just ordered one made by SKS from AEBike ("SKS Chainboard," sounds like a CIA interrogation techinque). I am going to put it on my townie singlespeed, so I got the one for SS with a max 38 tooth capacity in front. I will report back on how well it mounts up and the weight, etc. I mostly want it for keeping my chain cleaner and somewhat protected from direct road spray from the front wheel. It would take an extremely low-hanging mud flap up front to keep the spray off the front tire from not getting under the front fender.







    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  21. #21
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Some pics I found on Flickr:





    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  22. #22
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    I had one of those. I thought is was a really bad design. I had to butcher it so many ways to get it to work on what seems like a normal bike. I was still trying to figure out how to make it fit over my cranks (mine were too wide for this) and then realized the clamp that holds the back on place interfered with the higher gears in the back. I thought I put up something about it on this board, but maybe not.

    Edit: I just noticed you are using it for ss. That should alleviate some of the problems I was having.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    ...Otherwise, a velcro tie around the ankle seems to work pretty well.
    After searching for a few hours, I decided to use the velcro strap. And a cheap one I got at lowes for about $5 a pack. Not one of those 'specifically made' to keep your pants out of the chainline, since those cost ~$40.

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