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  1. #26
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    I was pretty thorough yesterday when taping up the inside of the rim...I even used an exacto knife to make sure no tape overlapped the ridge where the bead sits. Hopefully my attention to detail pays off.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jradin View Post
    My first few attempts at setting up tires tubeless was extremely frustrating. I hope you're a patient dude!

    Once you get the hang of it (and buy and an inexpensive air compressor) it's a pretty straight forward process. It's definitely worth the initial time investment given the time you'll save from fixing flats, not to mention better overall performance.
    It is really good to have your own compressor. Lots of times you have to make multiple attempts. It worked really well for me right out of the gate, but once I tried a non Specialized tire, I had some troubles. The Specialized 2Bliss tires seem to really go easy for me, both on my ghetto setup (Mavic TN-719 rims with yellow stans tape and stems that came with the DT Wheels that were on my 2010 StumpJumper) and my Bontrager Duster tubeless rims with their factory tubeless rimstrips and stems. But I've had to fuss with the Conti Tire I got last summer.

    One thing I do on my ghetto setup, use silicon caulk around the base of the stem. I caulk it and tighten down the stem nut to within about a full turn of tight and let the caulk dry overnight. Then tighten down the nut the rest of the way before mounting up the tire.

    And then it's best to go ride as soon as the air is in there. If you air it up and then leave it until the next chance you have to ride, you'll often find that it's gone flat on you. You can slosh the stans around in there, but it's not as effective at getting it into the voids between tire bead and rim as riding.

    I didn't really see a difference in the number of flats I got, but I was using sealant tubes. But the performance difference is dramatic, especially since I was using sealant tubes (they weigh a ton). I actually got a flat on my tubeless just by scratching a sidewall. It wasn't a cut, just enough of a scratch to make it so the casing wouldn't hold air. It wouldn't have been a blip for a tube setup.

    Do realize too, you can pinch flat a tire without a tube. It takes a much harder hit to have the rim cut through the tire casing than it does to cut snake-eyes in the tube, but it can be done.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  3. #28
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    If the tubeless tire gives you trouble setting the bead mount it first with a tube and only break the bead on one side to remove the tube then hit it with a compressor blasting up to the max PSI the tire can handle.

    FWIW- I run just above 20 PSI F and around 30 PSI R tubeless. Nothing less than 2.35 on F for floating through the gravel & sand.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by teleken View Post
    If the tubeless tire gives you trouble setting the bead mount it first with a tube and only break the bead on one side to remove the tube then hit it with a compressor blasting up to the max PSI the tire can handle...
    With the Conti tire I've had to futz with, getting the bead to snap in place wasn't hard. I usually roll on my newly mounted tires at high pressure, like maybe 35 or 40 initially, like during the climb. Then adjust down the pressure to where I want when it's time to corner.

    With that Conti tire, it will hold perfect when it's rock hard, but when I let out pressure and start cornering it goes soft. Air it back up to 35 and it will hold. But as soon as it's supple enough to deflect in the corners it seems to lose air on me again. It's like the bead isn't the right shape or something...
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  5. #30
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    I've had great success and utter failures will many rim/tire combos over the years. One combo has never failed me though: Maxxis tires on Mavic UST rims.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

  6. #31
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    By ghetto are you doing the tube cut over the rim to seal or the gorilla tape to make a stans style wheel? There are some tricks with the first that will help out a ton with the floor pump.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by teleken View Post
    If the tubeless tire gives you trouble setting the bead mount it first with a tube and only break the bead on one side to remove the tube
    This.

    This fall I got an SKS Aircon 6.0 oversized, MTB/fat tire only bike pump. Works great with 2.35/2.4 high volume tires. I think SKS now calls it the AirKompressor 12. REI sells one by Topeak called the "JoeBlow Mountain". Both pumps have large, oversized barrels and move a considerable amount of air with each pump.

    SKS: AirCon 6.0 reviews
    SKS Aircon 6.0 and Airbase Pro Floor Pump | Mountain Bike Review
    Product Test: SKS Aircon 6.0 Floor Pump | News | mountain-bike-action

    REI: Topeak JoeBlow mountain
    JoeBlow Mountain Floor Pump - Free Shipping at REI.com

    They're about $40-50 and are a good option for people living in apartments, or those without access to air compressors, or if you want to carry one with you on weekend bike trips. (I'll throw it in the Jeep if I'm heading to Moab/Fruita for a weekend. Good piece of mind that you can re-set a tubeless tire from camp.)

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    By ghetto are you doing the tube cut over the rim to seal or the gorilla tape to make a stans style wheel? There are some tricks with the first that will help out a ton with the floor pump.
    No, I went with the gorilla duct tape method...I found some that is 1" so it seemed perfect.

    One thing I guess I wasn't clear on from the get go is....can I run my Kenda Nevegals with the ghetto set up or do I need to buy tubeless tires?

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikesBoardsBrews View Post
    No, I went with the gorilla duct tape method...I found some that is 1" so it seemed perfect.

    One thing I guess I wasn't clear on from the get go is....can I run my Kenda Nevegals with the ghetto set up or do I need to buy tubeless tires?
    I don't have a lot of experience with this, but I will give you mine...

    I was using standard (tubed) tires on my Stan's tubeless wheels, since I read a number of times that was recommended. It is a considerable weight savings. BUT, I shredded a sidewall on a near new Maxxis tire so I gave up and bought a tubeless tire.

    The sidewalls are night and day different on the tubed vs. tubeless tire. They are not equivalent brands but I am guessing this is typical.

    I did run one tubed tire til I wore out the tread (in 3 months, never buying a Kenda Slant Six again), so it is possible. Just be prepared for frustration if you choose that route.

    Good luck.

  10. #35
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    Hrmmm, well depending on how well Santa treats me, I might be able to invest in some parts, tires will be the first thing I get. Nothing more frustrating than humping your bike out of the trails! (Which happened to me yesterday!)

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikesBoardsBrews View Post
    Hrmmm, well depending on how well Santa treats me, I might be able to invest in some parts, tires will be the first thing I get. Nothing more frustrating than humping your bike out of the trails! (Which happened to me yesterday!)
    Sidewall tear?

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikesBoardsBrews View Post
    No, I went with the gorilla duct tape method...I found some that is 1" so it seemed perfect.

    One thing I guess I wasn't clear on from the get go is....can I run my Kenda Nevegals with the ghetto set up or do I need to buy tubeless tires?
    Do yourself a favor and get rid of these useless tires.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    Sidewall tear?
    No, pinch flats because I was running very low PSI.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    Do yourself a favor and get rid of these useless tires.
    What?! I like these tires!

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikesBoardsBrews View Post
    No, pinch flats because I was running very low PSI.


    What?! I like these tires!
    Heh.

    I'll let you in on a secret. Nevegals suck donkey nuts. If you run a low enough pressure that they grip well they pinch flat like crazy.

    If you pump them up to a pressure that you *don't* get pinch flats they suck in the grip department.

    And they wear out fast.

    Do yourself a favor and ditch the Crapegals.

  15. #40
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    Mind = Blown. What tires do you suggest then?

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikesBoardsBrews View Post
    Mind = Blown. What tires do you suggest then?
    Tires are for wimps. I ride on bare rims.

  17. #42
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    Uh oh.

    Quote Originally Posted by BikesBoardsBrews View Post
    Mind = Blown. What tires do you suggest then?
    Oh my dear God, is this going to degrade into another "which tire for the Front Range" thread?

    Please, give me strength.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Oh my dear God, is this going to degrade into another "which tire for the Front Range" thread?

    Please, give me strength.
    You shut your WHORE mouth, TP.

  19. #44
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    The nevegals are fine for a front tire for out here. They are a "ok" rear tire just slow and draggy and prown to pinch flats. Nevegal front with a ignitor rear is a pretty good all around tire set up in the 29er flavor.

  20. #45
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    They definitely make for a better front than rear tire out here. I suspect that is mainly because you can run the front at 25lbs without pinch-flatting every 250 yards.

  21. #46
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    I run tubes between 27-33psi and tires with stiff sidewalls and large volumes. Avoiding pinch flats is more technique than tire pressure. Slightly unweighting the rear end when it contacts acute edges when climbing, and "floating" (staying light on the bike, absorbing hits with the bike's suspension and legs/arms) over those edges on descents. Also, bunny-hopping is rather valuable in avoiding pinch flats.

    For practice, use a curb or small set of stairs and ride perpendicular to the step, clear the front wheel and lift the rear wheel over the step. Start slowly and work the speed up to build confidence.

    Tires I'm running on a hardtail:

    Front - Maxxis Minion dhf with exo 26x2.5
    Rear - Maxxis Ardent, with exo 26x2.25

    I run my 700x40c monster-cross tires at 35-40 psi on some FR trails and I have yet to pinch flat those. Knock on wood.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    They definitely make for a better front than rear tire out here. I suspect that is mainly because you can run the front at 25lbs without pinch-flatting every 250 yards.
    Very true, I like them even more when you cut every other transition knob off and you make a tire that does not give you kenda surprise and lets those side knobs eat. Dare I say almost " mini mary" ish (muddy mary ish)


  23. #48
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    40 psi for the climb, 30 ish on the downhill, conti diesel 2.5's, on 717's with tubes...
    been on the same fsr expert frame since new in 99. Ride because you love it, not to be a trendy a$$hole.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    Very true, I like them even more when you cut every other transition knob off and you make a tire that does not give you kenda surprise and lets those side knobs eat. Dare I say almost " mini mary" ish (muddy mary ish)

    Jeezus. That's a lot of effort for making a $hitty tire tolerable.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    Jeezus. That's a lot of effort for making a $hitty tire tolerable.
    this
    been on the same fsr expert frame since new in 99. Ride because you love it, not to be a trendy a$$hole.

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