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  1. #1
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    West Mag Bike Choice

    I have never made it out to the West Mag trail system just to the south of Ned. I was wondering, for those who have ridden it, is a 6&6 or a hardtail 29r the better bike option for that trail system. Thanks

  2. #2
    Agent of tang
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    totally depends on what trails you're riding and what you like. the 29er will work fine for most of it, but there are some sections that the 6"er will be better. and there are some upper trails (harder to find without someone leading you) that have some fairly fast downhills where the 6"er will be better.

  3. #3
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    unicycle.
    Golden Bike Park Group

    Peak Cycles Gravity Team & Bikeparts.com
    Trestle Bike Park

  4. #4
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    Thanks IE that was helpful

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndecentExposure View Post
    unicycle.
    maybe one with training wheels?


  6. #6
    Kaj
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    I would recommend 26lbs of 29er goodness. It's working well for me. We've seen this frame built up under 22lbs, but for everyday riding the stock bike rips it.

    For my West mag choice it's the following in descending order:

    29er FS (Anthem X 29er)
    26er FS (6" travel, light all mountain--Maverick Durance for me)
    29HT
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails West Mag Bike Choice-anthem_x_1_29er_polished_blue_72dpiwide.jpg  

    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust in garage

  7. #7
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    a road bike should do the trick

  8. #8
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    It pretty much doesn't matter. 2 wheels, pedals, suspension or not, gears or not, it's just fun!
    A punctured bicycle
    on a hillside desolate,
    will nature make a man of me yet...
    -Morrissey

  9. #9
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    Is Nederland dried out now?

    Erik

  10. #10
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    magnolia was very dry this morning

  11. #11
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    I'd choose a bike with a good GPS and a topo map.

    Just rode there yesterday. It's got to be one of the worst marked trail networks I've ever seen. There's a ton of trails that aren't on the map. Go with someone who knows the trails if you can.

    Lots of trails are badly eroded and have a bunch of baby head rocks. Something with gears would be nice. Didn't see any other single-speeders and I'm guessing they knew something my stupid-bike-pushing self didn't...

  12. #12
    Agent of tang
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    It is very poorly marked, which for some of us is part of its charm. It shows its character in layers as you get to know it better. As for badly eroded trails and baby head rocks, well, it really depends on where you go up there.

  13. #13
    Rigid in Evergreen
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    The only crappy trails I've ridden there (I think) are the trails used regularly by the pony ride business.

  14. #14
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    No question in my mind... take the 6x6. But if you like punishing yourself the 29r should suffice

  15. #15
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    I'd think any trail worth traveling to would be better riden on a 6x6 than a hardtail, no?
    Keep the Country country.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    I'd think any trail worth traveling to would be better riden on a 6x6 than a hardtail, no?
    sounds true to me, but there are some people (I call them masochists ) who seem to think the hardtail is more pleasurable on all sorts of trails.

  17. #17
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    29ers are for road bikers who want to get into mountain biking.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by skogorbet View Post
    29ers are for road bikers who want to get into mountain biking.

    Are 26ers for cruiser bike riders who want to get into mountain biking?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggs View Post
    Are 26ers for cruiser bike riders who want to get into mountain biking?
    an odd response, especially since the modern day mountain bike was developed from old cruiser frames

    Excelsior!



    now go ride your magically wheeled wunderbike

  20. #20
    Kaj
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    I'm not a 29er zealot by any means, though I love mine. I still ride 26er's on my long travel bikes and dirt jumpers. However based on what I see folks buying, I think it's no longer the "different" choice but rather the normal choice--

    Here's what I saw over the past 30 years as the industry started w/ 26er's and then slowly added 29ers.


    1980-1990 just figuring it out, starting with the 26" cruiser, by 1990 you can by a solid long lasting 26" fully rigid bike, and people are just beginning to look at suspension for the mass market

    1990-1995: weight weeniedom reigns supreme. If you can save 5 grams and ano it purple it sells. A 21lb titanium rig with a Mag 21 SL is the dream bike. No one would dream of going 29er, as it's clearly heavier. people did experiment w/ 24" wheels to save weight.

    1995: The first 29ers are starting to show up, Bruce Gordon, Wilits etc, but not the big boys right away.

    1995-2005: More and more people try 29ers and like them--many small companies spring up building them, and some of the big brands (Gary Fisher most notably) go all in

    2005-2010: All the brands jump on the 29er bandwagon--they see sales grow, but 26ers still outsell them.

    2011: The freeride and jumping crew are not thinking about 29ers, but if a customer is spending more than $1500 and not getting a 6" or more bike, they are more likely to buy a 29er than a 26er. That's just based on what we see.

    I think this is the year that the switch flipped, the 26er becomes the specialty bike and the 29er is the "normal" bike.
    Last edited by Kaj; 07-02-2011 at 06:09 PM.
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust in garage

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggs View Post
    Are 26ers for cruiser bike riders who want to get into mountain biking?
    No, they are for people who live near the ocean.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaj;
    2011: The freeride and jumping crew are not thinking about 26ers, but if a yuppie or hipster newb that actually shops for bikes on The Hill or Pearl St is spending more than $1500 and not getting a 6" or more bike, they are more likely to buy a 29er than a 26er.
    Fixed that for ya.



    (I kid.. i kid.)

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bagwhan View Post
    sounds true to me, but there are some people (I call them masochists ) who seem to think the hardtail is more pleasurable on all sorts of trails.
    A hardtail gives a more "real" riding experience
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

  24. #24
    friend of Apex
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    My HT 29 has such a flat spot on the rear wheel it's like riding a horse. I need to get that relaced one of these days.
    Maybe when I get sick of my soft cushy suspension.



    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  25. #25
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    Originally Posted by Kaj;
    2011: The freeride and jumping crew are not thinking about 26ers, but if a yuppie or hipster newb that actually shops for bikes on The Hill or Pearl St is spending more than $1500 and not getting a 6" or more bike, they are more likely to buy a 29er than a 26er.

    Quote Originally Posted by thump View Post
    Fixed that for ya.
    (I kid.. i kid.)
    why kid?

    the truth shall set you free

    that post read like a commercial for magical wheels

  26. #26
    Kaj
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    I wrote too many 26/29 in one post ... the jumping, rallying, freeride, fun crew are on 26 not 29.

    my post was meant as a timeline of what people are actually buying. as a shop owner, I never say what people should buy--but I do let folks know what other people are buying.

    for what people should buy I defer to the latest Surly blog post

    http://surlybikes.com/blog/


    Surly blog, reposted below....
    ----------

    Some answers to just about any bike forum post I’ve ever read

    If you think your bike looks good, it does.

    If you like the way your bike rides, it’s an awesome bike.

    You don’t need to spend a million dollars to have a great bike, but if you do spend a million dollars and know what you want you’ll probably also have a great bike.

    Yes, you can tour on your bike – whatever it is.

    Yes, you can race on your bike – whatever it is.

    Yes, you can commute on your bike – whatever it is.

    26” wheels or 29” or 650b or 700c or 24” or 20” or whatever – yes, that wheel size is rad and you’ll probably get where you’re going.

    Disc brakes, cantis, v-brakes, and road calipers all do a great job of stopping a bike when they’re working and adjusted.

    No paint job makes everyone happy.

    Yes, you can put a rack on that. Get some p-clamps if there are no mounts.

    Steel is a great material for making bike frames - so is aluminum, carbon fiber, and titanium.

    You can have your saddle at whatever angle makes you happy.

    Your handlebars can be lower than your saddle, even with your saddle, or higher than your saddle. Whichever way you like it is right.

    Being shuttled up a downhill run does not make you a weak person, nor does choosing not to fly off of a 10 foot drop.

    Bike frames made overseas can be super cool. Bike frames made in the USA can be super cool.

    Hey, tattooed and pierced long shorts wearin flat brim hat red bull drinkin white Oakley sportin rad person on your full suspension big hit bike – nice work out there.

    Hey, little round glasses pocket protector collared shirt skid lid rear view mirror sandal wearing schwalbe marathon running pletscher two-leg kickstand tourist – good job.

    Hey, shaved leg skinny as hell super duper tan line hear rate monitor checking power tap train in the basement all winter super loud lycra kit million dollar wheels racer – keep it up.

    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

    The following short answers are good answers, but not the only ones for the question asked – 29”, Brooks, lugged, disc brake, steel, Campagnolo, helmet, custom, Rohloff, NJS, carbon, 31.8, clipless, porteur.

    No bike does everything perfectly. In fact, no bike does anything until someone gets on it to ride.

    Sometimes, recumbent bikes are ok.

    Your bikeshop is not trying to screw you. They’re trying to stay open.

    Buying things off of the internet is great, except when it sucks.

    Some people know more about bikes than you do. Other people know less.

    Maybe the person you waved at while you were out riding didn’t see you wave at them.

    It sucks to be harassed by *******s in cars while you’re on a bike. It also sucks to drive behind *******s on bikes.

    Did you build that yourself? Awesome. Did you buy that? Cool.

    Wheelies are the best trick ever invented. That’s just a fact.

    Which is better, riding long miles, or hanging out under a bridge doing tricks? Yes.

    Yes, you can break your collar bone riding a bike like that.

    Stopping at stop signs is probably a good idea.

    Driving with your bikes on top of your car to get to a dirt trail isn’t ideal, but for most people it’s necessary.

    If your bike has couplers, or if you have a spendy bike case, or if you pay a shop to pack your bike, or if you have a folding bike, shipping a bike is still a pain in the ass for everyone involved.

    That dent in your frame is probably ok, but maybe it’s not. You should get it looked at.

    Touch up paint always looks like ****. Often it looks worse than the scratch.

    A pristine bike free of dirt, scratches, and wear marks makes me sort of sad.

    A bike that’s been chained to the same tree for three years caked with rust and missing parts makes me sad too.

    Bikes purchased at Wal-mart, Target, Costco, or K-mart are generally not the best bang for your buck.

    Toe overlap is not the end of the world, unless you crash and die – then it is.

    Sometimes parts break. Sometimes you crash. Sometimes it’s your fault.

    Yes, you can buy a bike without riding it first. It would be nice to ride it first, but it’s not a deal breaker not to.

    Ownership of a truing stand does not a wheel builder make.

    32 spokes, 48 spokes, 24 spokes, three spokes? Sure.

    Single speed bikes are rad. Bikes with derailleurs and cassettes are sexy. Belt drive internal gear bikes work great too.

    Columbus, TruTemper, Reynolds, Ishiwata, or no brand? I’d ride it.

    Tubeless tires are pretty cool. So are tubes.

    The moral of RAGBRAI is that families and drunken boobs can have fun on the same route, just maybe at different times of day.

    Riding by yourself kicks ass. You might also try riding with a group.

    Really fast people are frustrating, but they make you faster. When you get faster, you might frustrate someone else.

    Stopping can be as much fun as riding.

    Lots of people worked their asses off to build whatever you’re riding on. You should thank them.
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust in garage

  27. #27
    MK_
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    It doesn't matter. Bring the bike you prefer riding, typically.

    On a side note; I rode west mag last night and man I miss how the trail used to be. All this re-root results in more twists and less flow and my favorite little descent off the 926 to where Magnolia road dead ends is now closed, replaced with a few twists and a "ride over a rock" feature. I was so totally bummed riding it.

    I wish people didn't try to do more with less sometimes.

    _MK

    Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not just surrounded by a*holes

  28. #28
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    6 and 6

    How much do those 6 inch bikes weigh? Are you all riding them back to Boulder or putting them on the roof of the car? Riding a 6 incher up and over Flag would be tough, I would think.

  29. #29
    Kaj
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    didn't mean for it to be a commercial, but rather a timeline of why it took so long for 29er's to go main stream. I am still happily selling and riding 26ers myself.

    but now, in 2011 at least people get a choice of what to ride, instead of saying 26ers are right for everyone. try and decide yo self-- I think for most people that can have 2, 3 or 4 bikes would have a couple of each, depending on the situation.

    choices are cool
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust in garage

  30. #30
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    how many years were 26ers right for everyone?

    bicycling is not an industry, it's a lifestyle and not what the "industry" is selling

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy View Post
    How much do those 6 inch bikes weigh? Are you all riding them back to Boulder or putting them on the roof of the car? Riding a 6 incher up and over Flag would be tough, I would think.
    Sure... because the hardtails bike up 20 miles of road from Boulder to get to West Mag.

  32. #32
    Kaj
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    Quote Originally Posted by KarateChicken View Post
    bicycling is not an industry, it's a lifestyle and not what the "industry" is selling
    couldn't agree more--ride on, we have a saying at FC, "the only bad bike is the one that's not being ridden"
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust in garage

  33. #33
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    Your favorite bike sucks.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaj View Post
    "the only bad bike is the one that's not being ridden"
    troot^

    i always add the wal-goose disclaimer to keep bso's out of the equation for those who don't know the deal

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