Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 69
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    14

    Trail etiqutte questions: runners and bikers

    bad_andys thread from a week or two ago about directional biking made me decide to post a related question. As primarily a trail-runner and hiker, I would appreciate your input.

    When I am running opposite direction, and see a biker coming up - if I am planning to pull off and let you continue without stopping – how far ahead and with what body-language or indication, should I let you know that?

    My thinking is that I can keep running down and pull up fairly quickly at fairly close range to let you pass, but I understand that the amount of time I may give you may not be the amount of time you need to adjust. Or for me to adjust. Whichever is needed.

    One of my pet peeves is the whole deal about any user-group thinking that it is they who have the entitlement to the trail and the others groups are secondary. And I want my actions to correspond with that. So help me out – what do bikers need on this point?

  2. #2
    a dad
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,302
    Trail runners are the worst, sorry, but its true..

    Just wave us through if you want us to continue..
    BBZ

    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy - Benjamin Franklin

  3. #3
    Loser
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    481
    Trail running etiquette 101:
    Make sure you run with your headphones in and the volume cranked up as high as possible to drown out any external sounds. Also, never check to see if anyone is behind you.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    139
    I'm new to this but I'd prefer approaching hikers and runners just own their right of way...when the bike is going down hill. If I'm riding down hill I'm not going to blow by someone at lightning speed anyway so when I slow down (far in advance as I always do...for serious!) you should keep up your pace so I can feel all warm and fuzzy about being a great trail citizen. Same applies on level terrain but if I'm struggling uphill and you're running down, I'm probably rolling along at a snails pace so you're in control of my destiny.

    In that situation its likely easier for you to step to the side a few feet away for 3 seconds than for me to stop and then find I'm in a terrible place to get a good kick and clip in to get back on my way on the undoubtedly loose terrain. Thats just an FYI. Its still up to the walker whether it ruins my rhythm or not IMHO.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    217

    Trail etiqutte questions: runners and bikers

    I think slowing at the last moment, though appreciated, might send mixed signals were you see the rider and the runner both coming to a near stop. When hiking, I like to signal to the coming traffic with my hand even though they might be a bit far. That way they know my intentions, and whether they should roll or stop.
    2009 Stumpjumper Comp HT.
    An old Trek 820 ST.

  6. #6
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4,577
    The commonly known rule of the trail is bikes yield to foot traffic. I always yield to foot, rather they're running or walking. If they are oncoming I'll come to a complete stop and give room for them to pass or at least slow to a walking pace if there's room. If I'm coming up from behind I'll call out some sort of greeting as far in advance as possible as pass slowly.

    Of course very often folks traveling on foot will step aside in which case I'll pass slowly and thank them. I don't expect foot traffic to do that though and I'm always prepared to yield. Trails need some basic guidelines of conduct and traffic and while the basic rule of "don't be a dick" should always be in peoples minds, having some commonly known rules of right of way helps keep us all on the same page.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,127
    Just give a "come on through" handwave to the biker so they know you will step off trail.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    68
    I bike and trail run - I figured out that just a wave gets misunderstood. What works better for me when running is jumping off the bike line and into the rough side of the trail which sends a pretty clear message and then talking/waving on those that still want to stop. That keeps everyone moving. If the trail is too tight then try stopping and stepping to the side of the trail first rather than trying to leave it as late as possible - most bikes will have slowed and stopped by then.

  9. #9
    The Fastest of Bananas
    Reputation: FastBanana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,205
    Just whatever you do, dont stop suddenly with riders behind you.

    A rider in front of me today slammed brakes today to stop for some ladies walking uphill.

    It was right around a corner, and I nailed him. Felt silly, but I couldnt stop.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurochien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    40
    Trail runners... The demi-gods of all outdoor activities. Mountain bikers are supposed not only to stop, but also dismount, lean the bike away from the trail and bow down in awe and sheer respect as the trail runner approaches.
    Last summer I was riding around Deer Creek after work and there must have been two dozens of these people freed by Zeus from Olympia. I kept stopping every 35 seconds. A memorable ride.

  11. #11
    Front Range, Colorado
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    17,904
    Some great responses guy's.....NOT!
    Basically by these kind of responses you just made us as mountain bikers look like we think we have entitlement.

    Multi use trails means exactly that we all need to share the road. We as mountain bikers are suppose to stop and let hikers and runners have the right of way. But as we all know that rule is not real life trail encounters.

    To the O.P. It's a great service to us mountain bikers that you do stop and step aside to let us by. As I stated you are not required to do so. But in reality and real world encounters we all know it just makes sense that hikers and runners do this. And in my opinion a good 50' before the encounter is adequate for us to slow down and pass. Of course every situation is different. And just common sense in any situation on both parts goes along way. In any event a friendly encounter with a friendly word exchange really helps in keeping good relations among all involved. And keep's trails open and future ones being opened for all.
    ----------- __o
    --------- _`\<,_
    BRAAP(>)/ (*)
    ************^^^^^^^Rock Garden

  12. #12
    Now with 10% more!
    Reputation: Da Dook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    401
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Some great responses guy's.....NOT!
    Basically by these kind of responses you just made us as mountain bikers look like we think we have entitlement.

    Multi use trails means exactly that we all need to share the road. We as mountain bikers are suppose to stop and let hikers and runners have the right of way. But as we all know that rule is not real life trail encounters.

    To the O.P. It's a great service to us mountain bikers that you do stop and step aside to let us by. As I stated you are not required to do so. But in reality and real world encounters we all know it just makes sense that hikers and runners do this. And in my opinion a good 50' before the encounter is adequate for us to slow down and pass. Of course every situation is different. And just common sense in any situation on both parts goes along way. In any event a friendly encounter with a friendly word exchange really helps in keeping good relations among all involved. And keep's trails open and future ones being opened for all.
    This post is right on. There's people in this thread claiming trail runners/hikers demand some kind of entitlement. In reality, that's how the rules on most trails are stated and if you feel differently perhaps your sense of entitlement is getting in the way. As DirtJunkie said, most trail runners/hikers usually will yield to mountain bikers, though I don't expect all of them to and it is appreciated when they do.

    "Just whatever you do, dont stop suddenly with riders behind you.

    A rider in front of me today slammed brakes today to stop for some ladies walking uphill.

    It was right around a corner, and I nailed him. Felt silly, but I couldnt stop. "

    I think stopping for uphill hikers around a corner is a good idea and if you weren't riding the @$$ of the person in front you'd probably be ok...

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    418
    It really shouldn't be too difficult. Be aware of your surroundings and pay attention to other trail users.

    If you have your earbuds in and can't hear something as loud as a bicycle coming up on you, then you're really not going to like anything that is ACTUALLY dangerous out in the wild.

  14. #14
    kgm
    kgm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    63
    This will end well.

    Everyone would love the earth to themselves, I bet. I ride in the fast lane, beep beep.

  15. #15
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,125

    Re: Trail etiqutte questions: runners and bikers

    This.

    Trail runners... The demi-gods of all outdoor activities. Mountain bikers are supposed not only to stop, but also dismount, lean the bike away from the trail and bow down in awe and sheer respect as the trail runner approaches.
    Last summer I was riding around Deer Creek after work and there must have been two dozens of these people freed by Zeus from Olympia. I kept stopping every 35 seconds. A memorable ride.
    And this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Terp View Post
    I'm new to this but I'd prefer approaching hikers and runners just own their right of way...when the bike is going down hill. If I'm riding down hill I'm not going to blow by someone at lightning speed anyway so when I slow down (far in advance as I always do...for serious!) you should keep up your pace so I can feel all warm and fuzzy about being a great trail citizen. Same applies on level terrain but if I'm struggling uphill and you're running down, I'm probably rolling along at a snails pace so you're in control of my destiny.

    In that situation its likely easier for you to step to the side a few feet away for 3 seconds than for me to stop and then find I'm in a terrible place to get a good kick and clip in to get back on my way on the undoubtedly loose terrain. Thats just an FYI. Its still up to the walker whether it ruins my rhythm or not IMHO.
    When the chicks at school see how gay we are, they're gonna be all over us.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,127
    And now the op is very sorry he ever brought this up on a mtn bike forum. Like I said, just give us a wave so we know you will step off, otherwise I'll stop my bike and let you run.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,437
    And we wonder why all trail users view bikers as idiots!!!! After reading this thread i would have to agree with them. Someone who does not ride bikes was nice enough to create an account on this site and reach out to us and the majority of the people respond with snarky comments. I know most of you were kidding but how would the user know this? This also makes me believe that other non-riders might be on this site watching all our tongue and cheek banter. Scary thought!

    Guess what guys. Trail runners and hikers basically do own the trails. It does not matter if they are going uphill or downhill they always have the right away. Luckily we have hikers and runners that are nice enough to step off trail as a common courtesy. I know i sound like a debbie downer who does not ride bikes but that is really how the right of way goes on the trails.

    Moraine,
    Thanks for taking the time to reach out to the mountain bike community to try and make everyone's trail experience a good one.

    It really depends what you are comfortable with. If i was a runner i would continue to run and maybe wave the rider ahead. The only caveat to this is some riders might bomb past you going as fast as humanly possible and endanger you. The majority of us on the trails are very respectful but there will always be a few bad seeds or people that are new to the sport and they don't know the rules.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    14
    I am quite certain that there are plenty of trail-users of ALL varieties who could use a little attitude adjustment; and I have been around long enough to expect a few unhelpful comments on a question such as the one I posed. I choose to scratch my head a bit and then ignore those.

    I am thankful for the helpful input.

    See you out on the trails.

  19. #19
    The Fastest of Bananas
    Reputation: FastBanana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,205
    While hikers have the right of way, most get out of your way. They know that uphill, you are working harder than they are, and they will move, and downhill, attempting to come to a comeplete stop with a big group can be dangerous.

    Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    42
    I know this is a touchy subject on the west coast and NW, but down here in Texas...people all just move out of the way of one another or adjust accordingly with little issues. It's common sense that whoever can more easily adjust...adjusts.

    I'll sometimes stop and move, and sometimes runners move. I move out of the way of faster riders too.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pinerider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    105
    As a mtb and trail runner most has been said already. When I am running on a bike trail I'll always yield to bikers because it's easy to do. I let them know by yelling something like keep coming or you're good, with enough time so they know what the plan is. Waving them through is just confusing for everyone. As a mtber, if I don't get a cue early from a hiker or runner I'll stop and yield. It's interesting how often it surprises them. Not a whole lot of jerks out there really. I've never met these entitled trail runners that have been ruining some of your lives.
    Take three hours of single track through a pine forest and call me in the morning.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ironbrewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    284
    Quote Originally Posted by cbrock450 View Post
    And we wonder why all trail users view bikers as idiots!!!! After reading this thread i would have to agree with them. Someone who does not ride bikes was nice enough to create an account on this site and reach out to us and the majority of the people respond with snarky comments. I know most of you were kidding but how would the user know this? This also makes me believe that other non-riders might be on this site watching all our tongue and cheek banter. Scary thought!

    Guess what guys. Trail runners and hikers basically do own the trails. It does not matter if they are going uphill or downhill they always have the right away. Luckily we have hikers and runners that are nice enough to step off trail as a common courtesy. I know i sound like a debbie downer who does not ride bikes but that is really how the right of way goes on the trails.

    Moraine,
    Thanks for taking the time to reach out to the mountain bike community to try and make everyone's trail experience a good one.

    It really depends what you are comfortable with. If i was a runner i would continue to run and maybe wave the rider ahead. The only caveat to this is some riders might bomb past you going as fast as humanly possible and endanger you. The majority of us on the trails are very respectful but there will always be a few bad seeds or people that are new to the sport and they don't know the rules.

    Moraine this is what I thought as well. I really hope people are more courteous on the trail than in this thread. Just use good eye contact, and let them know they can ride by as soon as you can. If you wait for the last minute, I would have stopped and leaned away from the trail before that. Thanks for the question.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    31
    First let me highlight my perspective before I go on. I am an avid outdoorsman that regularly rides horses, hikes and bikes on open space or NF trails, each in equal amounts. Quite the spectrum of responses here, somewhat surprised with the vanity of some but accurately gauges the types of people that I have encountered.
    It is humorous that this “cut & paste” argument is the same with the OHV, 4x4 crowds in respect to who has the right away vs. convenience to clear the opposing person. Taking all emotion or rationalizing out of this, it is a very cut and dry that unfortunately bikes at the bottom of the list. I would bet that everyone can agree that 90% of the people out there are good people no matter what and will be 100% respectful of anyone they encounter whether it is runners, hikers, equestrian or bikers. But you will always have that 10% of any group that ruin it for everyone. I have always been able to tell, within moments of seeing oncoming people no matter what I am doing, what my options are in respect to where I am at, always thinking how I can impact the other person the least, but that’s just how I role anyways.
    No different than motorists being agitated with bicyclist for impediment, why anyone would continue this demeanor is only because they themselves are “that person”.
    A weekend in September, I rode my horses on the peak to peak trail from Frisco to Breck and back, knowing that it is heavily used. I can not begin to tell you how awesome, friendly and respectful everyone I encountered. The exact opposite happened to me with the only bicyclist I ran into on a weekday ride at Stauntion State Park 2 weeks ago. Go figure.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    156

    Trail etiqutte questions: runners and bikers

    Here in the KC metro area, I don't see much waving/hand signals or even verbal expressions from runners/hikers. Most of them step aside well in advance of my arrival even though I start slowing immediately when I see one up ahead. I usually pass by them at about a brisk walking pace speed. If they have a dog with them, I'll go even slower because you never know how the animal will react to you.

    Coming up from behind a hiker, I'll slow down and call out well in advance. "On your left" is generally understood correctly, but sometimes it feels like I sound pushy if that's all I say. If I say "on your left, when you get a chance" it seems like I get a more favorable reaction.

  25. #25
    a dad
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,302
    Its the gosh darn EarBuds that are killing me lately. I swear every hiker or runner i encounter lately has them on and cannot hear me approach and cannot hear me ask politely to get around them. Eventually I have to yell loud enough to scare the crap out of them and I hate doing that...
    BBZ

    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy - Benjamin Franklin

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Questions for mountain bikers
    By IamTheWillrus in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 11-14-2013, 08:09 AM
  2. Heads up, Catoctin 50k Trail Run on Sat. 7/27. Runners on Blue trail
    By EABiker in forum Virginia, WV, Maryland, DC, Delaware
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-22-2013, 08:01 AM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-30-2012, 02:28 PM
  4. Deposit holding etiqutte
    By Noclutch in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-17-2011, 07:06 PM
  5. Replies: 35
    Last Post: 11-09-2011, 09:03 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •