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  1. #1
    Yappy little dog!
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    It was so mediocre...

    NOT!

    Just a couple from my ride today.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails It was so mediocre...-p1040824.jpg  

    It was so mediocre...-p1040831.jpg  


  2. #2
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    nice telephoto!!! great day to ride.


    Dave

  3. #3
    hehe ...you said "member"
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    the butterfly shot is amazing.
    “Me fail english? Thats unpossible.” - Matt Groening

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake7
    the butterfly shot is amazing.
    I'm pretty sure that's a hairy moth....

  5. #5
    Yappy little dog!
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    Quote Originally Posted by gearwhine
    I'm pretty sure that's a hairy moth....
    Hesperis Fritillary to be exact and officially a Butterfly.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnauzers
    Hesperis Fritillary to be exact and officially a Butterfly.
    so be it...but it's still hairy!

  7. #7
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    A different view of that hairy whatever:
    Last edited by xcguy; 04-03-2011 at 10:49 AM.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gearwhine
    I'm pretty sure that's a hairy moth....

    Generally, if the antenae look like the ones in the picture (slender terminating in a club), then it is a butterfly. Moths generally have more complex antenae. If you know insects, then you can also look at the wing structures. Moths have structures that essentially couple their wings together.

    Schanauzer, I'm surprised you were able to key that butterfly to species without being able to see all the veinatian characteristics under the wing scales, though I don't have a key to species for Nymphalids here, so I don't really know if they are required. Can see that HV is not curved basally from a family standpoint (so not a Heloconid) and the scent gland of the Theclinae appears to be absent (again, scales could be an issue on an actual observation)...and I have seen enough of these to know the family, but have never gone beyond that.

    Oh yeah, great picture by the way!

    What number plate are you running?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCR1
    Generally, if the antenae look like the ones in the picture (slender terminating in a club), then it is a butterfly. Moths generally have more complex antenae. If you know insects, then you can also look at the wing structures. Moths have structures that essentially couple their wings together.

    Schanauzer, I'm surprised you were able to key that butterfly to species without being able to see all the veinatian characteristics under the wing scales, though I don't have a key to species for Nymphalids here, so I don't really know if they are required. Can see that HV is not curved basally from a family standpoint (so not a Heloconid) and the scent gland of the Theclinae appears to be absent (again, scales could be an issue on an actual observation)...and I have seen enough of these to know the family, but have never gone beyond that.

    Oh yeah, great picture by the way!

    What number plate are you running?
    Whoa! TMI . I just compared the pic I took with photos I found on a Website that had Butterflies of Colorado. I'm just happy I get my camera out fast enough for the thing to stand still for a picture. Of course, I could always walk down to the Butterfly Pavilion (steps from my office) and shoot away.

    What do you mean by number plate? If you are talking about the plate attached to the bike, it's my Boulder Mountain Bike Patrol plate.

  10. #10
    Yappy little dog!
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy
    A different view of that hairy whatever:
    Did you take that?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCR1
    Nymphalids
    No wonder tramp stamps are typically butterflys...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gearwhine
    No wonder tramp stamps are typically butterflys...




    Nice photos schnauzers!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnauzers
    Did you take that?
    Yup. I went out last summer with my D40 and a 55-200mm. I spent about an hour trying to capture these little suckers "perfectly". Lots of continuous shooting, lots of running from flower to flower where they'd land, a whole lotta zooming in. This is just one of quite a few that came out pretty clear. Check out the scales on the antennae!

    I've been trying to get dragonflies in flight the past few weeks and am finding it almost impossible. In flight, mind you, not perching on a twig. Try it.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCR1
    Generally, if the antenae look like the ones in the picture (slender terminating in a club), then it is a butterfly. Moths generally have more complex antenae. If you know insects, then you can also look at the wing structures. Moths have structures that essentially couple their wings together.

    Schanauzer, I'm surprised you were able to key that butterfly to species without being able to see all the veinatian characteristics under the wing scales, though I don't have a key to species for Nymphalids here, so I don't really know if they are required. Can see that HV is not curved basally from a family standpoint (so not a Heloconid) and the scent gland of the Theclinae appears to be absent (again, scales could be an issue on an actual observation)...and I have seen enough of these to know the family, but have never gone beyond that.

    Oh yeah, great picture by the way!

    What number plate are you running?
    Does this give you a clearer view of "under the wing scales"?
    Last edited by xcguy; 04-03-2011 at 10:49 AM.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy
    Does this give you a clearer view of "under the wing scales"?
    Better view of under the wings, but not under the scales...usually requires a dead butterfly/moth, some ethanol for soaking, and occassionally some people will use tape to remove them..scales are like on fish, just in this case, a good bit smaller. Helpful if they get caught in a web they can break away and such. Sure there are other physiologic reasons for them, but I don't recall learning about it. I specialized in aquatic insects though, more specifically the use of aquatic macroinvertebrates as bioindicators of degraded water quality.

    That is an awesome image! It definately shows what appears to be a 4-leeged insect, but is just the characteristic tht I find most telling of theat particular family group...alos known as brush footed butterflies.

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