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  1. #1
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    Snow tires for Front Range?

    What is recommended tire setup for winter/snow riding the trails in the Front Range? Currently considering getting some studded tires but wanted to see what others are using. Apologies if this topic has been covered..if so, pls direct me to that thread.

  2. #2
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    Big fat tires.
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  3. #3
    Big Boned
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    I go the exact opposite direction, if the snow isn't too deep. I've always found CX tires cut through the crud and find the dirt or pavement underneath better, especially going into turns when floating = sliding. If you're talking about riding in a foot of snow, fatties are better. But in 3-4 inches, I take my cue from the Belgians. I've ridden every day since this last storm, on trails, jeep roads and snowpacked pavement, and it's been great.

    -EDIT- Assuming, of course, you have a 29er, that is...
    Never rub another man's rhubarb.

  4. #4
    ..ouch
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    Nokian's:

    Wide enough for the fluffy but spikies for the ice: http://www.suomityres.fi/sw336.html

    And for the 29'er crowd: http://www.suomityres.fi/ext294.html

  5. #5
    Inflexable...
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    Quote Originally Posted by thump
    Nokian's:

    Wide enough for the fluffy but spikies for the ice: http://www.suomityres.fi/sw336.html

    And for the 29'er crowd: http://www.suomityres.fi/ext294.html
    Handmade in Findland? Does some guy carve them out with his pocket knife?



    Does anyone know where to buy these? I can see myself using the 2.3's...
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  6. #6
    ..ouch
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    I picture an old nordic guy gluing each tread on individually.

    Google for nokian freddie's 336 will give you some options.

  7. #7
    The Notorious S.L.O
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    hmmm.....

    maybe it is because I am beyond cheap, but I run the same tires I run the rest of the year, for snow, it helps if they are relatively new with tread.
    Panaracer, fire and smoke. 2.1
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  8. #8
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    I have tried last year with the tires you mentioned....

    and it was "hit or miss" deal. Even when it was doable, the ride was very sketchy in certain spots. What I need is something more reliable and consistent that will allow me to be more committed in some serious riding this winter. I just received 2.3 Geax Lobo Loco real cheap. I am thinking of converting them into studded and giving it a try.

  9. #9
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
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    Since under that snow is usually wet mud I would look for a tire designed for wet conditions.
    Something like a Big Earl, wet.
    Softer rubber (<60 durometer) would have more grip.
    I to vote to run 1 size smaller to cut thru the snow better and reduce rolling resistance. ~2.1" would be my choice.

    When the trail is hard frozen you are talking ice and only studded tires grip ice.

    hth
    Last edited by SingleTrackLovr; 12-01-2007 at 09:00 AM.

  10. #10
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    I ride winter, a lot. The spare bikes have various snow-compatible tires on them. The common theme among all of them is to get a larger tire and air them down. Snow riding is about cutting through to the dirt for about the first snow ride or two of the year. The rest of the winter it is about staying on top of packed snow and getting traction on the ice layer under the snow.

    On the Yeti, I ran 2.4 Mutanoraptors at 23psi in the 2-3" of snow on Sunday above Palmer Lake, they worked just fine. No ice layer to speak of yet, but real loose gravel under the snow. You might pinch them in rocky sections, but typically snow fills those in and you are going a bit slower than summer riding. Tubless aired down would be ideal!

    I have a SuperV set up for when more snow comes in and for snowpacked rides that tends to be loose snow. This bike is running Panaracer 2.4 FR's - just get a big wire-bead cheap knobby tire. These work well on the Peaks Trail out of Frisco after the skiers pack it down, and on most hiker packed/snow machine packed stuff. Consider siping big knobby tires - use a razor and cut the tread - aired down they are unstoppable on all but pure ice - and even there they have some grip. By far this is the tire I ride more than anything in the winter on snowpack - cross country ski trails, packed dirt roads, hiker packed trails, etc.

    On another SuperV, I have Nokian 2.3 studs for when the trails change to "ribbons of ice", or climbing on roads (Mt Herman, etc) packed by vehicle traffic down to ice. Either build your own with sheet metal screws, or buy some. With sheet metal screws, my friend uses stans in a tubeless setup and they seal up fine, or with tubes uses an old road bike tire with the beads cut off to line it. These home-built screw tires work very well on unconsolidated deeper stuff and hardpack - especially with a layer of ice underneath it. Pure, glazed ice created by vehicle traffic the studs are a bit long and don't have a bite like shorter factory studs. Nokians work well but are pricey. They make a huge difference and last for many seasons. On rides where you are on rocks, dry streets, dirt, and then only some snow/ice, studs are a pain and you will have less traction and rip studs out spinning on rocks or braking on streets. For pure off-road packed snow trail riding - build-your-own is going to work a bit better. Following my friend around with longer sheet metal screw studs his tire seems to spin less than mine unless on the real nasty ice that you'd avoid if possible anyway. For real hardpack ice riding, factory studs are probably better.

    Oh - Get some eggbeaters or Time or some pedals for snow, if spd's have one drawback, it is snow riding.
    good luck!
    jon

  11. #11
    what nice teeth you have
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    this site has some info on winter riding:
    http://www.icebike.org/

  12. #12
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    not complicated

    #1-If it is dry, your "normal" tires. #2-If it is melting & muddy, stay off the trail dude so the trail is not trashed & closed. Take up skiing or running. #3-If it is snow covered, frozen, see #1.

  13. #13
    Stayin' Puft
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    2 approaches, depending...

    When the snow is fresh, thin layer, and the ground is frozen or firm enough, I would go for a 700c 35 'cross tire in the back, and a little bit fatter tire in the front, I have been using a 44 Bontrager Jones XR 29er to keep the front from washing out. This is on a fixed 29er...but you might have clearance on a 26er to fit the 700c wheels as well depending on the frame. This is for the cut-through-the-snow approach. If you are stuck on a 26er, go for a skinny/knobby rear and slightly more aggressive front.

    The true-fatty bike for me (poor man's Pugsley) is a Surly 1x1, running 26" WTB Timberwolf 2.7's...these are the fattest folding-bead tire I could find last year. Wires get so heavy. These are the tires for the "float on the snow" approach. It looks like WTB is only making the 2.5's anymore, but you can find new 2.7's on ebay cheap. Be sure your frame has the clearance if you buy. the Surly 1x1 frame is actually the most flexible winter frame I have seen because it will fit either wheelset, and takes standard BB and hub dimensions. Not like you want a derailleur or anything.

    Fixed rear and disc front, air down and you are good to go!

  14. #14
    Biker Beau
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    Studs on ice!

    Great info on the board as usual, many different ways to approach this subject with equally good results.

    I'm a long-time Nokian user in many different flavors and absolutely love them. Lots of mixed riding on the Front Range and if you are going to be transiting to the trail on your bike, all I can say is please be *extremely* careful on the black/glare ice that we tend to accumulate.

    For riding ON the snow, particularly when we finally get enough to do that on a regular basis, wide is great and the studs, as mentioned before don't really do anything for ya except make the tires much, much heavier.

    The icebike site is a good one but my personal fav when it comes to steering folks to studded tire info is the fabulous Peter White site: http://peterwhitecycles.com/studdedtires.asp

    No, I have nothing to do with PWC, just appreciate the level of detail he includes

    To the snow!

    Allen

  15. #15
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    IRC Blizzards

    I have had good luck with IRC Blizzards, though it looks like other "serious" winter riders say they stink. I think for most of the winter riding, esp. on the Front Range, they are more than sufficient. The other great thing about snow tires is you only use them for a short time and typically, they have harder rubber to keep the studs in, so they last forever. I have had my Blizzards for about 15 years. They are starting to get some dry-rot, but they still work fine. Another bonus is you can find 'em in the $50 range, much cheaper than the Nokians.

  16. #16
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    It doesn't seem like there is consensus on what....

    the best setup is. I do have a 29er ss that I'm going to give a try but not sure how I can negotiate those hills that I have hard time keeping traction during the summer time. It also sounds like high percentage riders hang up their bikes during the winter season. If so, how are the folks stay in training? Roading?

  17. #17
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by elee325
    how are the folks stay in training? Roading?

  18. #18
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    skinny tires are best for snow riding, same goes with snow wheels + tires for cars
    get to the choppa!!!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiffycake
    skinny tires are best for snow riding, same goes with snow wheels + tires for cars
    Tell that to the Pugsley. I think a couple inches of snow=skinnies but for deep powder you need float.

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