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  1. #1
    Your bike is incorrigible
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    Snakes is a good sign!

    Saw my first rattler of the season this afternoon. Nice 4' prairie rattler, well fed. Stopped to say hello, but he hid in the bushes. I take seeing a rattler this early to be a very good sign for the summer riding season. Screw the farmer's almanac; snakes are a better predictor.

  2. #2
    skillz to pay billz
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    snakes on the plains!!!

  3. #3
    Your bike is incorrigible
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOby
    snakes on the plains!!!
    Best movie ever! You know exactly what's going to happen to the couple in the mile high club.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Snakes is a good sign!-snakes-plane.jpg  


  4. #4
    "Oldfart from Wayback"
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    I haven't seen any rattlers this year, but the Garter snakes were thick a few weeks back.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guyechka
    Saw my first rattler of the season this afternoon. Nice 4' prairie rattler, well fed. Stopped to say hello, but he hid in the bushes. I take seeing a rattler this early to be a very good sign for the summer riding season. Screw the farmer's almanac; snakes are a better predictor.
    Where were you riding?

  6. #6
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    I saw this guy on the wild turkey trail on 4/15. No rattles, but he looked kind of like a rattlesnake to me. A cheap imitation?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Snakes is a good sign!-2010-04-15-14.47.48-cropped.jpg  


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ansible
    I saw this guy on the wild turkey trail on 4/15. No rattles, but he looked kind of like a rattlesnake to me. A cheap imitation?
    Thanks, now I am never riding WT again

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ansible
    I saw this guy on the wild turkey trail on 4/15. No rattles, but he looked kind of like a rattlesnake to me. A cheap imitation?
    it's a bull (gopher) snake
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  9. #9
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    A harmless gopher snake.

    Note: No rattles, small head not like a rattle snakes triangular viper head, and the marks on the back at first glance look like diamondback markings, but are square, not diamond pattern.

    Edit: Damn it Highdell you under cut my snake expert authority.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    Edit: Damn it Highdell you under cut my snake expert authority.
    what's this one?
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
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    That bad boy actually prey's on rattle snakes and their eggs more of these mean less rattlers, but then more rodents and so on and so forth fine balance you see!

  12. #12
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    I had a stand off with a baby rattler today on Zorro. Small but scary!! I hate snakes!!

  13. #13
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    The one I played with with on the C Creek trail, just north of the Parker entrance. I had been riding around on all the southern singletrack in the high grass! Of course, prairie rattlers are harmless unless you're stupid enough to run after one and try to molest it. Just walking up to one will make it so scared it will zip away.

    It's diamond backs that annoy me. Those guys are mean as hell. They are aggressive and actually go on the offensive. You don't want to get close to one of them. Just stick to the prairie and rock rattlers and you'll be fine.

  14. #14
    zrm
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    Well for goodness snakes!

  15. #15
    I dream on two wheels
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    Saw a baby rattler on the climb up to Dakota Ridge tonight.
    Whiskey

  16. #16
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    You guys should be thankful that ALL of our venomous snakes on the front range come equipped with a "don't mess with me" noise maker. Out east, we had the privilege of the copper head, who has all of the charm of the rattle snake without the rattle. Needless to say, they still scare the crap out of me.

    Also, I think we are going too easy on these alleged rattle snake sightings. No pics, no sighting. The rules don't change just because the thing you are saying you saw is pretty scary.

  17. #17
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    Bull snakes will also shake their tail in the grass to mimic a rattler sound. I stay away from them regardless. Bulls can get pretty mean and they'll still bite. Not poisonous but I hear it still hurts like hell.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by B-Rant
    You guys should be thankful that ALL of our venomous snakes on the front range come equipped with a "don't mess with me" noise maker. Out east, we had the privilege of the copper head, who has all of the charm of the rattle snake without the rattle. Needless to say, they still scare the crap out of me.

    Also, I think we are going too easy on these alleged rattle snake sightings. No pics, no sighting. The rules don't change just because the thing you are saying you saw is pretty scary.
    Juvenile rattlesnakes don't have the noisemaker and are unable to do anything but bite as hard as they can, so they can be quite dangerous.

    By and large just leaving the snakes alone is the best policy.

  19. #19
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    Got real close to a pissed off rattler on the south side of Morrison Slide this afternoon. Scared the everlivinsh1t out of me.
    It was about three switchbacks from the top, I was feeling rather haggard, wandering a bit, trying to get my wits for the switchback move. Suddenly, a whole mess of commotion and rattling was going down about 6 inches from my right ankle, on the uphill side of the trail. I let out a primal scream and got my leg on the other side of the bike faster than a Belgian in December. I shuffled back and watched it for a bit. It was wicked ornery.
    After I got my heart rate under about 275, I spotted a little washout a few feet back that went up to the next bit of trail, scrambled up that and continued on.
    I spoke with a hiker at the top who thought she might have heard some rattling, but had her headphones in. Freaked her out a bit for her return trip down.
    Keep an eye out up there.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowtron
    Got real close to a pissed off rattler on the south side of Morrison Slide this afternoon. Scared the everlivinsh1t out of me.
    It was about three switchbacks from the top, I was feeling rather haggard, wandering a bit, trying to get my wits for the switchback move. Suddenly, a whole mess of commotion and rattling was going down about 6 inches from my right ankle, on the uphill side of the trail. I let out a primal scream and got my leg on the other side of the bike faster than a Belgian in December. I shuffled back and watched it for a bit. It was wicked ornery.
    After I got my heart rate under about 275, I spotted a little washout a few feet back that went up to the next bit of trail, scrambled up that and continued on.
    I spoke with a hiker at the top who thought she might have heard some rattling, but had her headphones in. Freaked her out a bit for her return trip down.
    Keep an eye out up there.
    Now you have to decide whether to try to wash those shorts or just toss them.

  21. #21
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    Bull snakes are usually pretty docile. I've caught a few in the three to four foot range. I saw one last year on the lower part of Sandy Wash, and it was the biggest damned bull I've ever seen! It was at least six feet, and it was as big around as my arm. I got out the camera only to find the batteries were dead. Plus, he was pissed off at me disturbing him, and I wasn't going to risk a bite from a snake that size even if it was non-venomous. About a hundred yards further down there was an older couple out for a hike with their dogs. I always wondered what happened when those dogs found the snake.

    This guy today, though, was super frightened. I got about five feet away, and he took off into the bushes. I tried to count the rattles (like you can actually tell anything from that beyond the first few years), and there were at least five rows. He wasn't any juvenile.

    The best rattler I saw was a fellow in the 10 to 12 foot range. That was in New Mexico. He was crossing a path in Bandolier Park, and there was a huge crowd gathered to watch him. He was a diamond back, but he was more interested in getting out of the sun than anything.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guyechka
    ...
    The best rattler I saw was a fellow in the 10 to 12 foot range. ...
    sorry, but I call BS
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  23. #23
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    This reminded me of the best TV edit ever!


  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tempest3070
    Juvenile rattlesnakes don't have the noisemaker and are unable to do anything but bite as hard as they can, so they can be quite dangerous.

    By and large just leaving the snakes alone is the best policy.

    Not to mention a juvenile will strike multiple times, unlike most adult, and has the same amount of venom as an adult.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guyechka
    ...
    The best rattler I saw was a fellow in the 10 to 12 foot range. ...
    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    sorry, but I call BS

    You mean because of this, maybe?

    Crotalus atrox
    Species: C. atrox

    Common names: western diamondback rattlesnake,[2] Texas diamond-back,[3] more.
    Crotalus atrox is a venomous pitviper species found in the United States and Mexico. It is likely responsible for the majority of snakebite fatalities in northern Mexico and the second greatest number in the USA after C. adamanteus
    Adults commonly grow to 120 cm (3.9 ft) in length. Specimens over 150 cm (4.9 ft) are infrequently encountered, while those over 180 cm (5.9 ft) are very rare. The maximum reported length considered to be reliable is 213 cm (6.99 ft) (Klauber, 1972). Males become much larger than females, although this difference in size does not occur until after they have reached sexual maturity.

    Me too.
    Last edited by mtn hack; 05-17-2010 at 11:20 PM.

  26. #26
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    ^^^ yes
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  27. #27
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    No good Hi!

    Quote Originally Posted by PaintedSingleTrack
    Not to mention a juvenile will strike multiple times, unlike most adult, and has the same amount of venom as an adult.
    Haven't seen any rattlesnakes yet this year, my friends have seen a few on their trail rides. I ran into a big nonpoisonous snake about a week ago, when I was running my dog out in the desert. A bite from a baby Mohave Green rattlesnake, would be a life changing event for sure. Probably depends on where you get bit, if you live or not. I almost got bit by a Mojave Green in 1992, in Randsburg CA. It was 1:30 AM, 15 miles from the nearest hospital, if it was even open. If I would of got bit in the face, I'm almost sure I would of died. I worry more about running into a mountain lion/ bobcat/coyote(s), when I'm riding alone. I'm re-thinking riding alone anymore, there's some scary stuff out here in the high desert AZ.

  28. #28
    rsi
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    I've heard the babies are also more apt to bite w/their venom,while with the adults you might only get a dry bite since it is more a defense mechanism than immobilizing prey.
    Either way watch out where you step off the trail these days...

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowtron
    Got real close to a pissed off rattler on the south side of Morrison Slide this afternoon. Scared the everlivinsh1t out of me. .

    I'm not sure which is worse, getting that close to a rattler or climbing the south side of the Morrrison Slide
    I did it south to north ONCE and have always done it from the north since.
    “Me fail english? Thats unpossible.” - Matt Groening

  30. #30
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    Man,,, I didn't even know it until I passed my first snake for the season (or ever when MTB'ing). At first, I thought it was a branch, then as I passed it, it looked dead. I stopped. I told my son (behind me few yards back) to stop and let me see if it was alive. To find out it was. I'm glad it did not strike @ me (lol). It went on it's way off trail and my son booked past that area like no tomorrow. LOL. To me, when I see snakes its a sign of many rodents around the area along with good moisture.

  31. #31
    zrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX_Shifter
    Man,,, I didn't even know it until I passed my first snake for the season (or ever when MTB'ing). At first, I thought it was a branch, then as I passed it, it looked dead. I stopped. I told my son (behind me few yards back) to stop and let me see if it was alive. To find out it was. I'm glad it did not strike @ me (lol). It went on it's way off trail and my son booked past that area like no tomorrow. LOL. To me, when I see snakes its a sign of many rodents around the area along with good moisture.
    Yep, good rodent crop will most likely = good snake (and anything else that feeds on rodents) crop.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guyechka
    The one I played with with on the C Creek trail, just north of the Parker entrance. I had been riding around on all the southern singletrack in the high grass! Of course, prairie rattlers are harmless unless you're stupid enough to run after one and try to molest it. Just walking up to one will make it so scared it will zip away.

    It's diamond backs that annoy me. Those guys are mean as hell. They are aggressive and actually go on the offensive. You don't want to get close to one of them. Just stick to the prairie and rock rattlers and you'll be fine.
    I don't think you can make generalizations about aggressiveness of snakes. I've ridden by diamond backs stretched out on the side of the trail, and they don't even flinch, so I don't see them until they catch my eye as I'm zooming past. Other times, I'll be on a trail and a snake will coil and start his buzzing before I get within 20 or 30 feet and I'll wonder how he even knew I was coming. But I appreciate the early warning.
    You might think its related to temperature, and I suppose it is in part, but I've seen very docile snakes in hot weather, and I knew a guy who got bit in cold weather in February (in Tucson, but still it was cold).

    I know snakes look scary, which could trick your mind into thinking they look bigger than they are, but I'm pretty sure you didn't see a 10-12 foot diamond back in New Mexico.

    The Eastern Diamond back is bigger than the Western. I was living in Alabama for a while, and small town living leads one to find creative forms of entertainment. every year they had a rattlesnake rodeo, where people would catch snakes and bring them, and there would be 55 gallon drums full of them. They would dump them on the ground, have races etc. Some really huge snakes, but I doubt if any were 10'. National Geographic says they can get to 8' though.

  33. #33
    formerly shabadu
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake7
    I'm not sure which is worse, getting that close to a rattler or climbing the south side of the Morrrison Slide
    I did it south to north ONCE and have always done it from the north since.
    I like to climb....errr, I should say, I climb the south side out of necessity because the north side is a much more fun downhill. Its got some great rock doubles.

    Heres a crappy iphone pic of the ornery little dude. You can see the marks from my tires right in front of it as I shrieked and slid sideways a few inches.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  34. #34
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    Watched some idiot on South Table last year stopped in the middle of the trail two feet across from a rat'ler. I stopped and looked at the snake and left about the time the DA slaps his hands together, starts rubbing them and puts a warm hand a foot and a half above a 4-1/2-foot snake.

    If he died, the mountain lions ate him and stole his bike 'cause I never saw him again
    This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Alps!

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn hack
    You mean because of this, maybe?

    Crotalus atrox
    Species: C. atrox

    Common names: western diamondback rattlesnake,[2] Texas diamond-back,[3] more.
    Crotalus atrox is a venomous pitviper species found in the United States and Mexico. It is likely responsible for the majority of snakebite fatalities in northern Mexico and the second greatest number in the USA after C. adamanteus
    Adults commonly grow to 120 cm (3.9 ft) in length. Specimens over 150 cm (4.9 ft) are infrequently encountered, while those over 180 cm (5.9 ft) are very rare. The maximum reported length considered to be reliable is 213 cm (6.99 ft) (Klauber, 1972). Males become much larger than females, although this difference in size does not occur until after they have reached sexual maturity.

    Me too.
    I once saw a catfish as big as a VW Beetle!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn hack
    You mean because of this, maybe?

    Crotalus atrox
    Species: C. atrox

    Common names: western diamondback rattlesnake,[2] Texas diamond-back,[3] more.
    Crotalus atrox is a venomous pitviper species found in the United States and Mexico. It is likely responsible for the majority of snakebite fatalities in northern Mexico and the second greatest number in the USA after C. adamanteus
    Adults commonly grow to 120 cm (3.9 ft) in length. Specimens over 150 cm (4.9 ft) are infrequently encountered, while those over 180 cm (5.9 ft) are very rare. The maximum reported length considered to be reliable is 213 cm (6.99 ft) (Klauber, 1972). Males become much larger than females, although this difference in size does not occur until after they have reached sexual maturity.

    Me too.
    Yeah, until you see it:

    The Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, or Crotalus atrox, a member of the family Viperidae, the subfamily Crotalinae, and the genus Crotalus, has such a hold on the human psyche that it has been a symbol of the American Southwest from prehistoric into historic times. It figures in ancient mythology, ceramics and rock art and in modern story and media.

    The King of the Southwestern Rattlers

    The Western Diamondback, which can exceed seven feet in length, is the king of our twenty odd species and sub-species of Southwestern desert rattlers, not only in terms of size, but also in terms of its fearsome reputation.

  37. #37
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Appears this thread may turn into a full-fledged Clavin Battle.

  38. #38
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    Saw two gopher snakes on the AFA part of the N. Sante Fe Trail on Mother's day. It's definitely a good sign that they are out!

  39. #39
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    just drop it guyechka - these no fukkin way there was a 10-12 foot rattler of any variety - the largest on record was an 8 1/2 Eastern diamondback.

    I once caught a 40lb largemouth bass
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  40. #40
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Where the hell is a herpetologist when you need one?

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    just drop it guyechka - these no fukkin way there was a 10-12 foot rattler of any variety - the largest on record was an 8 1/2 Eastern diamondback.

    I once caught a 40lb largemouth bass
    Nobody ever thought gar got very big either, until they caught this one:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...igator_gar.jpg

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    sorry, but I call BS
    as in Bull Snake?

    I'm about to open some freakin windows
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  43. #43
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    I agree that the temp doesn't seem to have as much to do with snake activity out in the open as much as sun does. I have pics of a rattler on Morrison slide from Thanksgiving day of 2008 - he was pissed.

    The biggest rattlesnake I've ever seen was in the Laurel Highlands of Pennsyltucky. I believe it was what they call a timber rattler. At first I thought it was a piece of an old tire but upon further inspection it looked like a dragon. It was prolly the biggest snake I've ever seen in the wild (thankfully.)
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Put the Fun Between Your Legs."

  44. #44
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    Saw a fox on my ride home, on 75th just north of Jay rd (Gunbarrel), carring a decently long snake, didn't look like rattler. I'm guessing she(?) was bringing home the days catch to the den. Coolest thing I've seen wild life related this year.
    Down is the new up.

  45. #45
    formerly shabadu
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    Where the hell is a herpetologist when you need one?
    It would be a shame to let an opportunity to say 'herpetologist' go to waste.

  46. #46
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    King snake up in Lory State Park yesterday. Seen plenty of rattlers up there, but never a king.

    EDIT: I know jack about snakes, but I can't find any evidence that king snakes even exist in northern Colorado. It had the red, black, and yellow stripes though, so I'm sticking with my story.

  47. #47
    Your bike is incorrigible
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    just drop it guyechka - these no fukkin way there was a 10-12 foot rattler of any variety - the largest on record was an 8 1/2 Eastern diamondback.

    I once caught a 40lb largemouth bass
    Bah, you guys are no fun at all. When you see a seven foot rattler, you try telling me your mind doesn't make it just a little bit bigger.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jradin
    King snake up in Lory State Park yesterday. Seen plenty of rattlers up there, but never a king.

    EDIT: I know jack about snakes, but I can't find any evidence that king snakes even exist in northern Colorado. It had the red, black, and yellow stripes though, so I'm sticking with my story.
    I've seen them at Rim Rock/Coyote Ridge. Beautiful snakes.
    Last edited by onbelaydave; 05-18-2010 at 02:11 PM.

  49. #49
    Your bike is incorrigible
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    Quote Originally Posted by jradin
    King snake up in Lory State Park yesterday. Seen plenty of rattlers up there, but never a king.

    EDIT: I know jack about snakes, but I can't find any evidence that king snakes even exist in northern Colorado. It had the red, black, and yellow stripes though, so I'm sticking with my story.
    Some people (not mentioning any names) would have you believe they don't exist in CO.

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