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  1. #1
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    Riding in the ozone...

    "Active adults of all ages who exercise or work vigorously outdoors have a higher level of exposure to ozone than people who are less active."

    Basics

    Repeated exposure to ozone can cause immediate symptoms and may cause a long term reduction in lung function.

    Denver often surpasses the EPA standard for ozone on hot summer days, especially weekdays.
    AND

    Many more people are commuting . (Although not enough to cause a significant decrease in ground level ozone).

    I would venture to guess the one's most at risk are riders who commute in the Denver metro on bikes during the peak ozone hours (2PM - 6PM). Although immediate Front Range rides (the one's that still require some exertion, anyway ) may pose a similar risk.

    My question is, does this affect how or if you ride?
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  2. #2
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    What does not KILL thee, makes thee STRONGER !!!

  3. #3
    Rolling
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    Simple. On hot, ozone alert days, I ride in the mountains early where it's cooler rather than down where it's hot. Ozone doesn't peak until the hot hours of the day, usually late afternoon, when the sun is high and lots of Nox are in the atmosphere.

    Denver has exceeded EPA reqs but it's not "often". However, it's happing more and more these days and the EPA has it's radar on Denver now.

    But this is the really interesting part; we (at NOAA) have measured elevated ozone up near the divide in the late afternoon, after easterly winds and flows have pushed metro-ozone into the mountain canyons. Thus, if you wait too late, you can encounter elevated ozone in the mountains too---sometimes even higher than down in the metro area.
    Last edited by lidarman; 07-28-2008 at 09:36 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bends But Doesn't Break
    What does not KILL thee, makes thee STRONGER !!!
    "That which doesn't kill you only puts off the inevitable."
    Phillipians 2:3-8 "...but (Christ) made himself nothing, taking the form of a servant..."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    Simple. On hot, ozone alert days, I ride in the mountains early where it's cooler rather than down where it's hot. .....

    Thus, if you wait too late, you can encounter elevated ozone in the mountains too---sometimes even higher than down in the metro area.
    Thanks for the info on the winds pushing ozone (and other pollutants) up against the divide. I knew this phenomenon existed but not to what extent.


    So you do alter your riding schedule a bit.
    How about communting, do you take it easy on the way home (assuming its peak ozone hours)?

    Does anyone feel a difference on ozone alert days?
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  6. #6
    holding back the darkness
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    Too bad the wind doesn't push all this ozone down south to antarctica, plugging the hole down there.
    **** censorship

  7. #7
    skillz to pay billz
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    thanks for bursting my bubble. Now if I only had a bubble to live in.




    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman

    But this is the really interesting part; we (a NOAA) have measured elevated ozone up near the divide in the late afternoon, after easterly winds and flows have pushed metro-ozone into the mountain canyons. Thus, if you wait too late, you can encounter elevated ozone in the mountains too---sometimes even higher than down in the metro area.

  8. #8
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    How about commuting, do you take it easy on the way home (assuming its peak ozone hours)?
    Unfortunately, I can't control my commute time as much as my recreational rides. However, the ozone is not so bad here in Colorado most of the time. I just ride home normally.

    I have been in Los Angeles and Houston when the ozone levels were over 200 PPB (75 PPB over 80 hrs exceeds EPA standards). Ozone appears to have a specific smell like the smell of electronics that produce arcs. Unfortunately the smell is probably a by-product of the ozone reacting with olfactory receptors in the nose rather than ozone itself.

  9. #9
    post-ride specialist
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    ...Unfortunately the smell is probably a by-product of the ozone reacting with olfactory receptors in the nose rather than ozone itself.

    Yes, that's my understanding as well. "metallic"

    I used to find if I'd ride on an ozone day, I'd get a deep burning feeling in my throat/lungs and an unsatisfiable shallow cough for the evening. I stopped riding those days.
    Since when did Need have anything to do with this?

  10. #10
    Living the High Life
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    I noticed the increased levels in the foot hills one day. I figured it would be okay at LOTB, went riding, and was coughing up crap for 24 hours. Apparently with the right wind Morrison road turns into an ozone funnel.

    I've noticed that on high days I'll get a sore throat and sometimes a lot of lung mucus. Freakin' sucks. My commute is up hill in the morning and down at night, so I'm lucky. But I avoid rides on high pollution days.
    Last edited by Ithnu; 07-28-2008 at 11:10 AM.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOby
    Now if I only had a bubble to live in.
    Ned?
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by icegeek
    I used to find if I'd ride on an ozone day, I'd get a deep burning feeling in my throat/lungs and an unsatisfiable shallow cough for the evening.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ithnu
    I've noticed that on high days I'll get a sore through and sometimes a lot of lung mucus.
    Good to hear it isn't just me, and probably not related to other factors.

    I've stopped commuting for a while.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  13. #13
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    Ozone is three molecules of Oxygen (i.e. O3 instead of O2). It's like super Oxygen. If two is good, three must be better.

    Just like that third Advil. Or that third Beer. Or that third blow to the head.....

    But seriously, I've never checked ozone levels and never noticed anything riding or running.

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=jsj3831]
    Ozone is three molecules of Oxygen (i.e. O3 instead of O2). It's like super Oxygen. If two is good, three must be better.
    Super oxygen indeed, if yur tryin to disinfect.

    Just like that third Advil. Or that third Beer. Or that third blow to the head.....
    5 Advil usually does the trick for me.

    But seriously, I've never checked ozone levels and never noticed anything riding or running
    I never used to get hangovers.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  15. #15
    skillz to pay billz
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    Ned?

    you're right, the smell of patchouli would even repel ozone. Unfortunately I'm like 6 miles away from town.

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