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  1. #1
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    Protection or permit to hog the road?

    Ypu gotta' love the title.........

    http://www.thedenverdailynews.com/article.php?aID=3387

    the beat goes on as Larimer county's finset share his pearls.

    a couple of my favorites:

    Sheriff Jim Alderden says he has encountered his share of cycling packs taking up the majority of either a lane, or an entire road. The situation “aggravates motorists,” he said.
    “A lot of the bicycles bring on anger in motorists for the way they’re riding,” said Alderden. “And (cyclists) can have a superior attitude when they’re out there riding their bicycle … But people can be irresponsible on both sides of this issue. Some bicyclists will give the finger to motorists, then the motorists get mad and buzz the bicyclists.”
    But Alderden said that since the dust-up, he has actually noticed cyclists obeying more rules of the road.

    Whether officers would be able to enforce the 3-foot rule or not, the sheriff says there needs to be more respect on the road.

    “Everyone needs to come down a bit and act a little more responsible,” he said. “There needs to be more courtesy on the road. Unfortunately, you can’t legislate that.”
    interesting point about courtesy and common sense.
    EricN
    The flood of fixed gear bikes, small t-shirts, and womens jeans will saturate craigslist

  2. #2
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    Man, that sheriff is a windbag, we need to find a way to oust him!
    Definitely give our city (which is really bike-friendly) a bad name. (Okay sorry, our COUNTY).

    I thought this law was already in place (I know I have seen stickers for it). In addition large trucks need to leave 5 feet of pass room I believe?

    I do find it funny that in the beginning of the article he insists there is a law saying bikes have to ride the shoulder, then in the end he wants clarification?

    I thought there were places in CO where riding two abreast is okay?

    Cyclists shouldn't be pushed around any more then slow moving farm equipment. We are vehicles and should be able to ride where we please. That said, common sense says stay where you are least likely to be hit. But when you have a group ride that is actually going the speed limit and taking up the whole lane, where is the crime?

    And while we are on it, on a four lane road, why will cars not just move to the center lane if it is open?!?!?!?

  3. #3
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    Colordo Cycling Law

    When operated on a roadway, a bicycle is a vehicle. A bicycle rider must obey the same rules as a car - he must signal turns, obey all traffic signs and even stop for emergency vehicles. An automobile driver must treat the bicycle just as he would treat another car.

    Cyclists on the "roadway" must usually ride single file. If you can see clearly and there is no traffic approaching from the rear, then you may ride two abreast. Any number of

    (a) A bicyclist is supposed to ride on the right:

    i. If there is a paved shoulder "suitable" for bicycle riding, then a cyclist must use it.

    ii. Otherwise, the cyclist must ride in the "right-hand lane." He must ride as far to the right as "practicable" in that lane if he is being overtaken by another vehicle.

    (b) A cyclist is not required to ride on the shoulder, in the right-hand lane, or to the right side of a lane if any of the following are true:

    i. If the cyclists is "overtaking and passing another bicycle or vehicle."

    ii. If the cyclist is preparing to make a left turn.

    iii. If it is "reasonably necessary to avoid hazardous conditions, including but not limited to, fixed or moving objects, parked or moving vehicles, pedestrians, animals, or surface hazards."

    The Federal model traffic code includes two more exceptions to the ride-to-the-right rules (3(a), above). Bicycles are not required to ride to the right if they are traveling the same speed as other traffic or if the lane is not wide enough to include the bicycle, another vehicle, and a safe distance between them. These exclusions are not provided in the Colorado law. Perhaps you should point out this oversight to your state legislators.

    Here are some questions that might come to mind:

    What is the "right-hand lane?" Does this mean a bicycle must ride in the "right-turn-only" lane at intersections?

    We think not. "Right-turn-only" means just what it says. If you aren't turning, you shouldn't be in it. Sometimes, though, where the right-turn lane replaces the paved shoulder on highways, the safest action may be to ride in the middle or to the left side of that lane until the shoulder returns.

    What about intersections? Staying to the far right puts a cyclist in the path of traffic that may be turning right.

    The City of Boulder tells cyclists to ride in the center of the lane when passing through intersections. We like this idea. It makes you more visible to traffic and discourages cars from turning in front of you.

    Boulder has another wise law: Boulder regulations specify that if a line of cars is stopped at an intersection, a cyclist may pass them on the right up to the rear wheel of the first vehicle in line. We strongly recommend you use this tactic or just move into the lane and take your place in the waiting line of traffic. That first car in line isn't expecting anybody to pull to its right; it isn't going to see you, and it is likely to turn right on top of you. Ask former Loveland city councilman Gene Packer Gene_Packer@hp.comabout his experience with the 18-wheeler at the intersection of Taft and Eisenhower.



    cyclists may ride side-by-side if they all stay on the shoulder, because the law doesn't consider the shoulder to be part of the "roadway."

    A bicycle must have brakes in good working order and must be equipped with a red rear reflector (even during daylight hours).

    A bicycle is allowed on any road unless there are signs specifically prohibiting bicycles. You are not required to use a nearby bike path merely because it exists

    You are not required to have any kind of license to operate a bicycle, but it might be a good idea to carry identification. If the police stop you for an offense, they have the authority to detain you until they can satisfactorily identify you. No points may be assessed against your driver's license for an offense you committed while riding your bicycle.
    Somebody better get me a stamp...I'm gonna send it

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by T10irons
    When operated on a roadway, a bicycle is a vehicle. A bicycle rider must obey the same rules as a car - he must signal turns, obey all traffic signs and even stop for emergency vehicles. An automobile driver must treat the bicycle just as he would treat another car.

    Cyclists on the "roadway" must usually ride single file. If you can see clearly and there is no traffic approaching from the rear, then you may ride two abreast. Any number of

    (a) A bicyclist is supposed to ride on the right:

    i. If there is a paved shoulder "suitable" for bicycle riding, then a cyclist must use it.

    ii. Otherwise, the cyclist must ride in the "right-hand lane." He must ride as far to the right as "practicable" in that lane if he is being overtaken by another vehicle.

    (b) A cyclist is not required to ride on the shoulder, in the right-hand lane, or to the right side of a lane if any of the following are true:

    i. If the cyclists is "overtaking and passing another bicycle or vehicle."

    ii. If the cyclist is preparing to make a left turn.

    iii. If it is "reasonably necessary to avoid hazardous conditions, including but not limited to, fixed or moving objects, parked or moving vehicles, pedestrians, animals, or surface hazards."

    The Federal model traffic code includes two more exceptions to the ride-to-the-right rules (3(a), above). Bicycles are not required to ride to the right if they are traveling the same speed as other traffic or if the lane is not wide enough to include the bicycle, another vehicle, and a safe distance between them. These exclusions are not provided in the Colorado law. Perhaps you should point out this oversight to your state legislators.

    Here are some questions that might come to mind:

    What is the "right-hand lane?" Does this mean a bicycle must ride in the "right-turn-only" lane at intersections?

    We think not. "Right-turn-only" means just what it says. If you aren't turning, you shouldn't be in it. Sometimes, though, where the right-turn lane replaces the paved shoulder on highways, the safest action may be to ride in the middle or to the left side of that lane until the shoulder returns.

    What about intersections? Staying to the far right puts a cyclist in the path of traffic that may be turning right.

    The City of Boulder tells cyclists to ride in the center of the lane when passing through intersections. We like this idea. It makes you more visible to traffic and discourages cars from turning in front of you.

    Boulder has another wise law: Boulder regulations specify that if a line of cars is stopped at an intersection, a cyclist may pass them on the right up to the rear wheel of the first vehicle in line. We strongly recommend you use this tactic or just move into the lane and take your place in the waiting line of traffic. That first car in line isn't expecting anybody to pull to its right; it isn't going to see you, and it is likely to turn right on top of you. Ask former Loveland city councilman Gene Packer Gene_Packer@hp.comabout his experience with the 18-wheeler at the intersection of Taft and Eisenhower.



    cyclists may ride side-by-side if they all stay on the shoulder, because the law doesn't consider the shoulder to be part of the "roadway."

    A bicycle must have brakes in good working order and must be equipped with a red rear reflector (even during daylight hours).

    A bicycle is allowed on any road unless there are signs specifically prohibiting bicycles. You are not required to use a nearby bike path merely because it exists

    You are not required to have any kind of license to operate a bicycle, but it might be a good idea to carry identification. If the police stop you for an offense, they have the authority to detain you until they can satisfactorily identify you. No points may be assessed against your driver's license for an offense you committed while riding your bicycle.

    excellent information.
    I personally think that a great deal of the trouble is related to personality 'type' conflicts, that are exacerbated by ignorance (of cyclist RIGHTS and RESPONSIBILITIES).

    of course, you can see the thread participation on this board is really low on this thread, but a veritable sh!tstorm on the 'Native' thread.
    maybe cyclist are perpetuating their own aggravation out of apathy and ignorance.

    and yes trimess, I am also annoyed by people who drive right next to you when they have a wide open road to yield a cyclist a few extra feet of space.

    anyway, back to the MTBR Front Range threads of inane trail conflicts and relocation suggestions....................................
    EricN
    The flood of fixed gear bikes, small t-shirts, and womens jeans will saturate craigslist

  5. #5
    Your retarded
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    T10, where did you get that info? I'd like to cite the source and frankly, I just don't think "T10irons said" will cut it. "Your sister's house" probably won't cut it either. ;-)
    A trail that’s too difficult wouldn’t exist because it’d never be used. But, trails can exist that’re too difficult for you.

  6. #6
    Almost Human
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickle
    T10, where did you get that info? I'd like to cite the source and frankly, I just don't think "T10irons said" will cut it. "Your sister's house" probably won't cut it either. ;-)
    I'd like to know also. This is what I found.


    from Colorado Statutes : TITLE 42 VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC : REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC : ARTICLE 4 REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC : PART 14 OTHER OFFENSES : 42-4-1412. Operation of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles.

    Operation of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles

    (1) Every person riding a bicycle shall have all of the rights and duties applicable to the driver of any other vehicle under this article, except as to special regulations in this article and except as to those provisions which by their nature can have no application. Said riders shall comply with the rules set forth in this section and section 42-4-221, and when using streets and highways within incorporated cities and towns, shall be subject to local ordinances regulating the operation of bicycles as provided in section 42-4-111.

    (2) It is the intent of the general assembly that nothing contained in House Bill No. 1246, enacted at the second regular session of the fifty-sixth general assembly, shall in any way be construed to modify or increase the duty of the department of transportation or any political subdivision to sign or maintain highways or sidewalks or to affect or increase the liability of the state of Colorado or any political subdivision under the "Colorado Governmental Immunity Act", article 10 of title 24, C.R.S.

    (3) No bicycle shall be used to carry more persons at one time than the number for which it is designed or equipped.

    (4) No person riding upon any bicycle shall attach the same or himself to any motor vehicle upon a roadway.

    (5) Any person riding a bicycle shall ride in the right-hand lane. When being overtaken by another vehicle, such person shall ride as close to the right-hand side as practicable. Where a paved shoulder suitable for bicycle riding is present, persons operating bicycles shall ride on the paved shoulder. These provisions shall apply, except under any of the following situations:
    (a) When overtaking and passing another bicycle or vehicle proceeding in the same direction;
    (b) When preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway;
    (c) When reasonably necessary to avoid hazardous conditions, including, but not limited to, fixed or moving objects, parked or moving vehicles, pedestrians, animals, or surface hazards.

    (6)(a) Persons operating bicycles on roadways shall ride single file; except that riding no more than two abreast is permitted in the following circumstances:
    (i)When riding two abreast will not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic; or
    (ii)When riding on paths or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles.
    (b) Persons riding two abreast shall ride within a single lane.

    (7) A person operating a bicycle shall keep at least one hand on the handlebars at all times.

    (8)(a) A person riding a bicycle intending to turn left shall follow a course described in sections 42-4-901 (1), 42-4-903, and 42-4-1007 or may make a left turn in the manner prescribed in paragraph (b) of this subsection (8).
    (b) A person riding a bicycle intending to turn left shall approach the turn as closely as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway. After proceeding across the intersecting roadway to the far corner of the curb or intersection of the roadway edges, the bicyclist shall stop, as much as practicable, out of the way of traffic. After stopping, the bicyclist shall yield to any traffic proceeding in either direction along the roadway the bicyclist had been using. After yielding and complying with any official traffic control device or police officer regulating traffic on the highway along which he intends to proceed, the bicyclist may proceed in the new direction.
    (c) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this subsection (8), the transportation commission and local authorities in their respective jurisdictions may cause official traffic control devices to be placed on roadways and thereby require and direct that a specific course be traveled.

    (9)(a) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection (9), every person riding a bicycle shall signal his intention to turn or stop in accordance with the provisions of section 42-4-903; except that a person riding a bicycle may signal a right turn with the right arm extended horizontally.
    (b) A signal of intention to turn right or left when required shall be given continuously during not less than the last one hundred feet traveled by the bicycle before turning and shall be given while the bicycle is stopped waiting to turn. A signal by hand and arm need not be given continuously if the hand is needed in the control or operation of the bicycle.

    (10)(a) A person riding a bicycle upon and along a sidewalk or pathway or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk shall yield the right-of-way to any pedestrian and shall give an audible signal before overtaking and passing such pedestrian. A person riding a bicycle in a crosswalk shall do so in a manner that is safe for pedestrians.
    (b) A person shall not ride a bicycle upon and along a sidewalk or pathway or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk where such use of bicycles is prohibited by official traffic control devices or local ordinances. A person riding a bicycle shall dismount before entering any crosswalk where required by official traffic control devices or local ordinances.
    (c) A person riding or walking a bicycle upon and along a sidewalk or pathway or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk shall have all the rights and duties applicable to a pedestrian under the same circumstances, including, but not limited to, the rights and duties granted and required by section 42-4-802.

    (11)(a) A person may park a bicycle on a sidewalk unless prohibited or restricted by an official traffic control device or local ordinance.
    (b) A bicycle parked on a sidewalk shall not impede the normal and reasonable movement of pedestrian or other traffic.
    (c) A bicycle may be parked on the road at any angle to the curb or edge of the road at any location where parking is allowed.
    (d) A bicycle may be parked on the road abreast of another bicycle or bicycles near the side of the road or any location where parking is allowed in such a manner as does not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic.
    (e) In all other respects, bicycles parked anywhere on a highway shall conform to the provisions of part 11 of this article regulating the parking of vehicles.

    (12)(a) Any person who violates any provision of this section commits a class 2 misdemeanor traffic offense; except that section 42-2-127 shall not apply.
    (b) Any person riding a bicycle who violates any provision of this article other than this section which is applicable to such a vehicle and for which a penalty is specified shall be subject to the same specified penalty as any other vehicle; except the section 42-2-127 shall not apply.

    (13) Upon request, the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction shall complete a report concerning an injury or death incident that involves a bicycle on the roadways of the state, even if such accident does not involve a motor vehicle.

    Section 2. 42-4-802 Pedestrians' right-of-way in crosswalks.
    Pedestrians' right-of-way in crosswalks.

    (3) No pedestrian shall suddenly leave a curb or other place of safety and ride a bicycle, walk, or run into the path of a moving vehicle which is so close as to constitute an immediate hazard.


    Seems a little gray to me. I don't see anything stating that "bicycles are vehicles", only that "Every person riding a bicycle shall have all of the rights and duties applicable to the driver of any other vehicle under this article".

    Having been hit and injured BY ANOTHER CYCLIST on the road I can vouch for the fact that a bicycle being considered a "vehicle" is entirely dependent upon the District Attorney and their interpretation of Colorado law. Regardless of what the law says, to just about anyone who doesn't ride a bike on the road, you are a pedestrian. The point is, don't trust a law to protect you from hostile or ignorant drivers. Be careful all the time. We lost 2 great guys in the Springs last year.

    UT

  7. #7
    183 BRO's before hoes.
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    Road bikers scare the crap out of me, in the summer I live in fear of driving around a corner and there being a cyclist in the middle of the road. I get sick of the ones that ride 2+ abreast and riders that can't hold a line.

    I feel sorry for the good cyclists, you may drive by 50 of them and the only one you remember is the one that was being a jackass.

  8. #8
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    I feel sorry for the good cyclists, you may drive by 50 of them and the only one you remember is the one that was being a jackass.

    Same can be said about drivers.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickle
    T10, where did you get that info? I'd like to cite the source and frankly, I just don't think "T10irons said" will cut it. "Your sister's house" probably won't cut it either. ;-)
    I'm going to go out on a limb and say he got it here....................

    http://users.frii.com/pedal/laws.htm
    EricN
    The flood of fixed gear bikes, small t-shirts, and womens jeans will saturate craigslist

  10. #10
    Almost Human
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsalty
    I'm going to go out on a limb and say he got it here....................

    http://users.frii.com/pedal/laws.htm
    The laws were changed in 2005.
    http://bicyclecolo.org/page.cfm?PageID=45

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail
    The laws were changed in 2005.
    http://bicyclecolo.org/page.cfm?PageID=45

    better link, but saying Nickle's sisters house would be totally fine also.
    unless of course you wanted to go totally MTBR and say his Mother's house, that would also be acceptable.
    EricN
    The flood of fixed gear bikes, small t-shirts, and womens jeans will saturate craigslist

  12. #12
    FleshwoundGravityResearch
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    Alderden is f'en @$$(*&^ regardless of how cyclists ride. He has always had this attitude toward us and it is indicitive of probably half the dumba$$es driving on the road. These are probably the same dumba$$es I want to kill when I am driving, and they GREATLY outnumber the total number of cyslists in existance.

    Yes, there are a FEW of the type of cyclists he describes, and yes, they make a big impression on people. But his statements only help to justify these shiddy attitudes toward cyclists. When are people going to wise up and fire this dick?

    Damn I hate people! [+1 for a super virus killing off half the population]

    How's that for a rant?

  13. #13
    Your retarded
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn hack
    How's that for a rant?
    I think I liked this thread more when we were discussing my family's places of residence.
    A trail that’s too difficult wouldn’t exist because it’d never be used. But, trails can exist that’re too difficult for you.

  14. #14
    OMG!
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    i personally can't get over riding down the side of the road with two ton hunks of steel blazing past me. who knows who is driving or what is distracting them. no matter who is to blame, the rider always loses. when you ride on the road, you are laughing in the face of death (or the dumb blonde doing her makeup, talking on the phone and swerving off the road in her F250)

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