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  1. #1
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    Oil drilling in Soapstone Natural Area

    This really pisses me off. I love it up there and I go up there to get away from civilization.

    Drilling out a plan: Oil boom on the horizon worries many | The Coloradoan | coloradoan.com

  2. #2
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    Yes, it is quite a threat to the peaceful experience that we are accustomed to.

  3. #3
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    Golly jee whiz....Who would figure that that companies want to drill for oil, keeping up with demand, in places where it hasn't been sucked dry?

    ....I say if you don't like it, then I hope you ride your bike everywhere then---especially TO the soapstone trailhead. It would be kinda hypocritical to drive all that distance for recreation and then complain about oil drilling.

  4. #4
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    Oil and Gas own this state, so do not expect any entity to be able to stop the O&G industry from drilling whenever and wherever they own the mineral rights, which is most of the state.

    How completely this state is owned is beyond belief. Bill Owens was essentially inserted into the Governor's job by the Oil and Gas industry (he was the former Executive Director of the Colorado Petroleum Association and Executive Vice President of the Rocky Mountain Oil and Gas Association). Hickenlooper is a geologist and has shown himself to be a total apologist for the oil and gas industry. The measure passed last week to "require" drillers to disclose the chemicals in their fracking fluids has a loophole a mile wide that allows them to declare a fracking fluid to be a "trade secret". What a crock of s**t.

    I'm sure some dick with connections to the oil industry is going to jump me now with the same tired rhetoric about "you drive your car don't you" blah, blah, blah. Yes, I do, and I drive what I drive because no one in government has the balls to stand up and tell the truth about our energy future, which is that we are so screwed that no one DARE tell the truth. The truth is this: we use 18-19 million barrels of oil per day in this country, and at the very peak of our production, when Texas and OK were going gangbusters, we didn't even pump 10 million per day from the US. We now produce 6-7, and even with all the technology and billions in investment, that number as barely moved the past few years. We have one choice, and that is to actually reduce our consumption, and there is only one way to do that, and that is to have the gonads to look in the mirror and recognize that we either bite the bullet now, or we let it blow our heads off in twenty years when OPEC decides to screw us with another embargo. The price of oil tripled in the early 70's the last time that happened, but then we only imported 35% of our needs, and if you don't think our economy would completely disintegrate with $300 a barrel oil this time, you are clueless.

    Our friend and Republican punching bag Al Gore suggested long ago and far away that we have a 50 cent a gallon gas tax to try to spur us into some kind of respect for our most important finite resource, and he was castigated and ridiculed into oblivion because that would have made the price of gasoline a completely unacceptable $1.75 per gallon! If we had actually taken that step, we might by now have had an infrastructure that would allow us to tell the Saudis and the others that hate us to go f**ck themselves. Instead, we still send EVERY president to Saudi Arabia early in their term to grovel before their King and swear we will keep their interests at heart in everything we do, so help us Allah.

    So keep on driving that Powersmoke, and we'll keep sending the thumper trucks across our most fragile landscapes (take a look around Moab out by Sovereign or up by Gemini sometime. What looks like roads crisscrossing out there are the scars left by oil exploration thumpers about ten years ago.) And we'll keep sacrificing 5 acres out of every 40 for drilling pads and roads to sink wells and pump "trade secrets" into the ground, until we have absolutely no oil or gas left, and we can just bend over and let those who conserved f**ck us in the ass for the rest of our time on earth.

  5. #5
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    Here we go. Just for fun, look up Al Gore's carbon foot print from his house compared to the average American house hold and how he gets rich with carbon credits. This week Michelle couldn't be bothered to wait 4 hours to leave for vacation with Barrack so she left in a separate aero-entourage necessitating twice the number of aircraft flying to Hawaii and twice the fossil fuel usage.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman View Post
    It would be kinda hypocritical to drive all that distance for recreation and then complain about oil drilling.
    Not when I spend the rest of the week conserving. And not when I spend every day making wind turbine blades so you and every one els in this country can have a future.

  7. #7
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    Alternative energy is fine and dandy but its not yet economical enough to replace fossil fuels. That's why subsidies are necessary for alternative energy to compete. Its good and necessary that we develop alternative energy, however, if America continues to purposely curtail its own fossil fuel production, high energy costs will continue to be a drag on our standard of living and economy. In my opinion a more reasonable balance is in order. I get the impression many Americans are beginning to realize this and there will be changes in 2012.

  8. #8
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    Quick test: Which industry gets ten times the subsidies of renewables??

  9. #9
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    If only a digital wind turbine could be created and installed within the front range mtbr forum.

  10. #10
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    Get used to it, dont like it move to some other 3rd world country, oh thats right we werent in iraq for oil, we were actually freeing the oppressed. Its about time this country starts making sacrifices for its extravaganzas. New world is coming

  11. #11
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    I find it ironic that people berate Gore for espousing capitalistic principles, putting his money into green initiatives, and making a profit! I wonder if an argument could be made for his promotion of greener principles as an offset against his "massively increased carbon footprint"?

    A new world is coming, that part is correct, get ready!
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Oil and Gas own this state, so do not expect any entity to be able to stop the O&G industry from drilling whenever and wherever they own the mineral rights, which is most of the state.

    How completely this state is owned is beyond belief. Bill Owens was essentially inserted into the Governor's job by the Oil and Gas industry (he was the former Executive Director of the Colorado Petroleum Association and Executive Vice President of the Rocky Mountain Oil and Gas Association). Hickenlooper is a geologist and has shown himself to be a total apologist for the oil and gas industry. The measure passed last week to "require" drillers to disclose the chemicals in their fracking fluids has a loophole a mile wide that allows them to declare a fracking fluid to be a "trade secret". What a crock of s**t.

    I'm sure some dick with connections to the oil industry is going to jump me now with the same tired rhetoric about "you drive your car don't you" blah, blah, blah. Yes, I do, and I drive what I drive because no one in government has the balls to stand up and tell the truth about our energy future, which is that we are so screwed that no one DARE tell the truth. The truth is this: we use 18-19 million barrels of oil per day in this country, and at the very peak of our production, when Texas and OK were going gangbusters, we didn't even pump 10 million per day from the US. We now produce 6-7, and even with all the technology and billions in investment, that number as barely moved the past few years. We have one choice, and that is to actually reduce our consumption, and there is only one way to do that, and that is to have the gonads to look in the mirror and recognize that we either bite the bullet now, or we let it blow our heads off in twenty years when OPEC decides to screw us with another embargo. The price of oil tripled in the early 70's the last time that happened, but then we only imported 35% of our needs, and if you don't think our economy would completely disintegrate with $300 a barrel oil this time, you are clueless.

    Our friend and Republican punching bag Al Gore suggested long ago and far away that we have a 50 cent a gallon gas tax to try to spur us into some kind of respect for our most important finite resource, and he was castigated and ridiculed into oblivion because that would have made the price of gasoline a completely unacceptable $1.75 per gallon! If we had actually taken that step, we might by now have had an infrastructure that would allow us to tell the Saudis and the others that hate us to go f**ck themselves. Instead, we still send EVERY president to Saudi Arabia early in their term to grovel before their King and swear we will keep their interests at heart in everything we do, so help us Allah.

    So keep on driving that Powersmoke, and we'll keep sending the thumper trucks across our most fragile landscapes (take a look around Moab out by Sovereign or up by Gemini sometime. What looks like roads crisscrossing out there are the scars left by oil exploration thumpers about ten years ago.) And we'll keep sacrificing 5 acres out of every 40 for drilling pads and roads to sink wells and pump "trade secrets" into the ground, until we have absolutely no oil or gas left, and we can just bend over and let those who conserved f**ck us in the ass for the rest of our time on earth.
    Just want to snap some reality into this post. The cost of energy has a direct correlation to the health of a nation's economy, its standard of living, and quality of life. Just going to present some data and let you make the conclusions.

    If you think the Middle East is the problem, below are some actual places where the US gets her oil. An oil embargo now from the Saudis will have an impact, but not nearly as much as you might think. The 300% honkinunit was talking about in the early 70's...the price before was about $4/brl vs ~$12/brl by the end of the 70's (1970's dollar...see plot - sourced from EIA and BEA). I used this plot in a recent paper for my MS work (accuracy only good up to 2010). A better perspective may be the contrast against the Real GDP...it took a hit w/ the 300% oil price jump, but also notice the rebound.

    Something else to keep in perspective is when/if the Saudis artificially inflate the price of oil, it makes recovering from more expensive reserves (Canadian tar sands) viable which will then bring the price back down. Notice the spike in 2008-2009...and the tar sands production is ramping up HUGE right now.





    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Oil drilling in Soapstone Natural Area-real-gdp-vs-crude-oil-price.jpg  

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  13. #13
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    Sort of related. I listened to a speech by a physics professor on Itunes once. He broke down some things that made it easy to understand. Essentially, 1 wind turbine can provide enough electricity for 700 people at the current rate of consumption. Ergo, 5,029,196 people in CO, that would mean we'd need 7200 turbines. US population in 2010 is 308,745,538 we'd need ~441000 turbines. And that's just domestic electricity.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    I find it ironic that people berate Gore for espousing capitalistic principles, putting his money into green initiatives, and making a profit! I wonder if an argument could be made for his promotion of greener principles as an offset against his "massively increased carbon footprint"?

    A new world is coming, that part is correct, get ready!
    I personally don't have a problem with anyone making a profit, what I have a problem with is the hypocrisy with which Gore makes his profits. Also, there is an obvious conflict of interest. As a result, what he says regarding environmentalism cannot be trusted.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Just want to snap some reality into this post. The cost of energy has a direct correlation to the health of a nation's economy, its standard of living, and quality of life. Just going to present some data and let you make the conclusions.
    Typical economic analysis done outside of geologic reality.

    Guess what? We are never going to see enough oil from Tar Sands in Canada to replace what we get from other sources, because there is not enough water there to increase production much beyond what it is now, and the environmental destruction is already horrendous. People forget that Canada's oil is FOREIGN OIL, and if the sovereign nation of Canada decides to shut off that spigot, what are we going to do, invade?

    BTW, OPEC is much bigger than Saudi Arabia, and it includes such US friendly countries as Venezuela and Iran. The Saudis do not have the excess capacity to cover Iran if it goes down, and there is no reason a coalition of rouge OPEC countries couldn't bypass the Saudis and vote an embargo themselves.

    A fact that many people don't realize is that while Saudi Arabia is the world's larger exporter of crude oil, they are NOT the world's largest producer. That would be Russia, another wild card in the oil game.

    Economists also conveniently ignore another geologic reality, and that is that every single oil source on earth is finite, and the moment you start pumping that source, you are in depletion mode. One of our largest oil suppliers is Mexico, but they are on track to become a net oil IMPORTER by 2020, because their largest field is nearly finished. The US drills thousands of new wells every year but this barely offsets the depleting production of existing wells. The Saudis are widely believed to be lying about their prospects as well, and absolutely refuse any outside inquiries as to their future prospects. See the great book "Twilight in the Desert" for more on that.

    Yet another factor widely ignored is that production of oil brings prosperity to the country pumping the oil, which also causes their internal consumption to rise. Mexico and Saudi Arabia are great examples. As production in these countries peak, they have to use more and more of their production to satisfy internal demands, which means their exports drop even if their production stays the same.

    Saudi Arabia knows that their production will never rise much, if any, beyond what it is right now, so they are using their oil proceeds to build massive solar farms so that they don't have to use oil to generate electricity.

    And before someone starts chiming in with the oil shale BS, forget it. The oil shale in western Colorado, SW Wyoming and eastern Utah will never be anything more than an emergency military supply, because the amount of water and energy needed to create usable oil from kerogen-infused rock makes that idea a pipe dream that will never come to fruition. It would take the equivalent of a new nuclear power plant for every 100,000 barrels of oil per day we could get out of oil shale. 100,000 barrels is about one-half of one percent of our consumption. Even if we used every available gallon of water in the Colorado river we couldn't produce 1 million barrels per day from shale, even if we were willing to build 10 nuke plants to power the process.

    The bottom line is very clear: we either suck it up and figure out how to prosper on half the oil we use today, or our economy withers under the constant price pressures from competing with China, India, Europe and the rest of the world. The days of being able to import massive amounts of cheap oil from other countries has ended, which is why oil is over $100 a barrel even in the face of lower demand caused by the economic crisis.

  16. #16
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    Yeah, those oil wells are going to distract from the HUGE power plant at the entrance.

    But seriously, they should have bought the mineral rights. They assumed that extracting oil would not be economical enough, so they decided not to do it. Whhooopssss....

    Listen, it's a good idea to conserve energy, but don't think you're "saving the earth"......the earth is fine Now, keeping pollutants out of the atmosphere a little more clear or saving energy resources so we will have more in the future? I can get on that bandwagon.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by russman View Post
    Sort of related. I listened to a speech by a physics professor on Itunes once. He broke down some things that made it easy to understand. Essentially, 1 wind turbine can provide enough electricity for 700 people at the current rate of consumption. Ergo, 5,029,196 people in CO, that would mean we'd need 7200 turbines. US population in 2010 is 308,745,538 we'd need ~441000 turbines. And that's just domestic electricity.
    And that is only when the wind is blowing at the appropriate speed (not too light, not too heavy).



    Regardless, the important issue is that they manage the extraction process so that it minimizes the impact and they are required to reclaim the sites once they are done.

    They didn't mention how many bbl's of oil they expect to get, what extraction method they would use, nor how long they expect it to take... which makes me very nervous.

  18. #18
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    In actuality generating revenue is what that land was set aside for. It's State School land managed by the SLB that was sold to the communities for recreation (revenue).

    The land was set aside by Congress with the Morrill Act of 1862 or Land Grant College Act. If you go to CSU, then you reap the direct benefits of the revenue generated from these mineral leases.

    "The State Board of Land Commissioners (also known as the State Land Board and the SLB) was established in 1876 to manage more than 3 million acres of land and 4 million acres of mineral rights that the federal government gave to Colorado to generate revenue for public education and some of the state's institutions. "

    (from the article you posted)
    Soapstone Prairie Natural Area - 22,000 acres
    » Meadow Springs Ranch - 26,500 acres

    » Red Mountain Open Space - 15,000 acres

    » Mineral rights owned by the Colorado State Land Board in the area - 15,718 acres

    » Revenue to the board through mineral rights leasing statewide in fiscal year 2008-09 - $67.8 million

    » Revenue from mineral rights leasing to the board statewide in fiscal year 2010-11 - $122.8 million

    The revenue generated from SLB lands is what keeps tuition rates a little lower than say on the east coast or a non-state university.

    Why do you think it's so cheap to go to college in Texas? and why so many out of state kids go to school down there.

    [EDIT]
    This is an interesting report on our energy reserves. Much larger than previously thought, or at least so says this group.
    http://energyforamerica.org/wp-conte...ntory-2011.pdf

    Who knows what to believe any more.
    Last edited by UncleTrail; 12-20-2011 at 10:46 AM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by topmounter View Post
    Regardless, the important issue is that they manage the extraction process so that it minimizes the impact and they are required to reclaim the sites once they are done.
    When a company drills a well, they have to put reclamation money into an escrow account that will be used to clean up the site once completed.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub View Post
    When a company drills a well, they have to put reclamation money into an escrow account that will be used to clean up the site once completed.

    Wrong. They have to post a bond, which is a totally different concept. And the bond amounts are ridiculously low.

    There was a recent case of an operator going bankrupt and abandoning wells in Rio Blanco county. Guess who pays for the cleanup?

    706 –Soil Protection, Plugging and Abandonment
    1.
    Old bonding amounts were $5,000 per well and $30,000 or $100,000 blanket bonds.
    2.
    New rules require $10,000 bond per well for wells less than 3000 feet deep and $20,000 bond per well for wells more than 3000 feet deep.
    3.
    Blanket bonds are now $60,000 (less than 100 wells) and $100,000 (more than 100 wells).
    4.
    New bonding levels are required for all wells except domestic wells bonded prior to May 1, 2009.
    5.
    An operator may seek a variance from these rules under appropriate circumstances.
    700

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Wrong.
    They put money down for clean up before ever drilling, that is the point I'm trying to make. Bond / escrow...whatever.

    I made no comments on the amount.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser View Post
    Not when I spend the rest of the week conserving. And not when I spend every day making wind turbine blades so you and every one els in this country can have a future.
    Where does the power come from to make those turbine blades? Certainly not from the wind turbines they're attached to.

    The options to meet our current and future energy consumption: extract more fossil fuels or mine more uranium. I hate both those realities, but it is what it is.

    Wind and solar energy are products of fossil fuel consumption. Thinking, for a moment, that they are sustainable or economical on such a large scale is ridiculous and delusional. The life span of a solar panel is 30 years (in perfect conditions), the life span of the hardware needed to convert dc to ac is less than half that. Copper wire, glass, and photovoltaics require greater energies to produce than the amount of energy generated by the end product. That is the exact opposite of the definition of sustainable.

    Then again, on a geologic time scale we're but a blip. Even on a evolutionary time scale we're but a blip. Thinking that we make such a large impact is ****-centric. For example, birds have evolved through two mass extinctions, and single celled organisms have existed for over 3000 million years.

    Further, not a single person (in this country, especially) can claim no culpability in the issue of resource extraction and and degradation. Acknowledging the problem is great. Mitigating ones consumption is commendable. But believing for a second that any industry that promotes itself as sustainable revels the depth of the pile of the wool rug pulled over our eyes.
    Last edited by rogbie; 12-20-2011 at 01:17 PM.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Where does the power come from to make those turbine blades? Certainly not from the wind turbines they're attached to.
    Excel will be producing 20% of their power in Colorado by renewables by 2020. I don't know what the percentage produced by wind is today, but it is not zero. So certainly some portion of the power used to produce the turbine blades comes from wind turbines themselves. Some comes from solar panels, some from coal and some from natural gas.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub View Post
    They put money down for clean up before ever drilling, that is the point I'm trying to make. Bond / escrow...whatever.

    I made no comments on the amount.
    A bond is totally different than escrow. Saying they are putting money down by holding a bond is like saying you have $300,000 in the bank because you bought a $300,000 auto insurance policy. A key point here is that if a company drills multiple wells, they can cover it with ONE $60,000 bond. The situation in Rio Blanco county where a company abandoned multiple wells shows that this is a stupid concept and just another example of how this state is a giveaway to oil and gas producers. The severance taxes in Colorado are a fraction of what they are in Wyoming, New Mexico, Oklahoma or Texas. Our setback requirements are half of those in Texas. We just passed a requirement to disclose the contents of fracking fluids but then let the companies themselves declare that the contents were a "trade secret".

    The oil and gas industry loves Colorado more than any other state, because they operate here with the most lax regs and essentially the lowest tax burden of any of the top producing states. They absolutely own the legislature and the Governor's office.

  25. #25
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    Seems wierd that no one has invented a self generating engine for automobiles. Kind of like the hybrids now, but on steroids.
    Then again why would a big manufacture spend all the money on R&D.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Excel will be producing 20% of their power in Colorado by renewables by 2020. I don't know what the percentage produced by wind is today, but it is not zero. So certainly some portion of the power used to produce the turbine blades comes from wind turbines themselves. Some comes from solar panels, some from coal and some from natural gas.
    While winds may fan the flames, never will wind be the flames.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post

    Copper wire, glass, and photovoltaics require greater energies to produce than the amount of energy generated by the end product. That is the exact opposite of the definition of sustainable.


    This is a right-wing talking point fallacy, and 10 seconds on Google can clear that up for you.

    The Oil Drum: Net Energy | The Energy Return of (Industrial) Solar - Passive Solar, PV, Wind and Hydro (#5 of 6)

    <cite>Energy return on investment (EROI) for photovoltaic energy

    File:EROI - Ratio of Energy Returned on Energy Invested - USA.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    </cite>

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Then again, on a geologic time scale we're but a blip. Even on a evolutionary time scale we're but a blip. Thinking that we make such a large impact is ****-centric. For example, birds have evolved through two mass extinctions, and single celled organisms have existed for over 3000 million years.
    This maybe the case but since we are here and now, I would rather not live in a world where there is mass man-made pollution (see Boston Harbor up to the early 90's). I would rather us deal with these issues and not leave it for future generation to hopefully deal with...just like the Republican's say about our national debt.

    The earth can clean itself over time however in many instances man is polluting faster than earth can repair itself. Ever drive up to Leadville? We are very smart people, we can find a way to progress that does not impact our ecomony or quality of life. Don't they say the younger generation maybe the first not too have a better quality of life than the previous generations?

  29. #29
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    Again, pointing out some misleading info about PV. From one of your ERIO sites:

    Approximately 2,895,000 exajoules (EJ) of solar radiation reaches Earth’s atmosphere yearly. When measured by satellite on the outer surface of Earth's atmosphere, this equates to about 1,366 watts per square meter. (only when the sun shines...so does this mean the satellite is in perpetual sunlight?) Thus, for the whole Earth, with a cross section of 127,400,000 km2, the power is 1.740×1017 W (this calc needs more clarification). This is an enormouse energy flow. In fact, the amount of solar energy intercepted by the Earth every minute is greater than the amount of fossil fuel the world uses every year. Another way to look at it is that on average, every square meter of the Earth’s surface intercepts 5.4 GJ of energy, approximately the same amount extracted from a barrel of oil, 200 kg of coal, or 140 m3 of natural gas. (not going to argue these points, but it needs to be qualified)

    So here we go:
    To start off, the maximum efficiency of PV is 50%, when averaged over a year. There is at best only 12 hours of day light. When you average this over a year, you remove the seasonal variations of longer days and nights.
    Assumption: these 12 hours of day light provide immediate power to PV cells instead of gradual ramp-up and down. I'll take this in trade for cloud effects to PV cells...clouds reflect light and can concentrate sunlight on the cells so they produce above their nameplate rating.
    By the metric of the article, they used 100% of the Earth's surface in its cross section. We can't...oceans. So, the 50% efficiency is now limited to 30% of land mass.
    Efficiency of the cell is further reduced by actual performance - terminal voltage. Today's cells are pushing 15% on the high side.
    All of this together: 0.5 * 0.3 * 0.15 = 0.0225, or 2.25% of the article's claimed value.

    Next, since the article did the cross section surface area and we can't, a root mean square value is about as close an estimate as I can "best fit" to the curvature of the earth in a non-tracking, fixed angle panel scheme ($$ROI on a tracking system worked out so the system can never pay for itself):
    0.0225/sqrt(2) = 0.0159, or 1.59%

    So, that's 1.59% based on what the article described of Earth's surface area can produce electricity. If we can capture this at a nice round number of 1000W/m2, we'd be set.
    The problems: we can't store the energy when it's dark, and the calc I used above is using 100% of the land mass.

    So the question: how much land are you willing to dedicate to PV panels? Then multiply that number by 3 for the batteries you'd need to ride thru the night.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Again, pointing out some misleading info about PV. From one of your ERIO sites: .................
    So the question: how much land are you willing to dedicate to PV panels? Then multiply that number by 3 for the batteries you'd need to ride thru the night.

    Green Energy?


    This toxic lake poisons Chinese farmers, their children and their land. It is
    what's left behind after making the magnets for Britain's latest wind turbines

    In China, the true cost of Britain's clean, green wind power experiment: Pollution on a disastrous scale | Mail Online

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    Your calculations make no sense. The whole point of EROI is whether a power source can produce more power over its lifetime than is used to produce, maintain and decommission it. You have absolutely nothing in your calculations about the amount of energy needed to produce a solar panel. EROI is generally expressed as a ratio, for example a 6:1 EROI means over the lifetime of the panel, it will produce six times as much energy as was used to produce it.

    How much land am I willing to dedicate? Well, for starters, my roof has enough square footage that PV could supply at least 1/2 my needs, so I guess an amount of land big enough to hold the additional panels not on my roof.

    But then my family electric bill (three adults) averaged over 12 months is about $45. I have no A/C, a very efficient furnace, and all of my bulbs are either LED or florescent. I turn off all of my electric stuff at night, and I have a single TV that runs maybe 5 hours per week. I am astounded when people complain about electric bills in the hundreds of dollars. WTH are they powering?

    I have known several people who are totally off the grid, and they are just fine. Both of my parents grew up without electricity until they were teenagers. Seriously, there is no reason other than being braindead pussies that we couldn't cut both our oil and electrical consumption in half with very little change in our lifestyles. Unfortunately our society is made up primarily of braindead pussies at this point. That will change going forward, because the crap will be hitting the fan in the next 20 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    Green Energy?


    This toxic lake poisons Chinese farmers, their children and their land. It is
    what's left behind after making the magnets for Britain's latest wind turbines

    In China, the true cost of Britain's clean, green wind power experiment: Pollution on a disastrous scale | Mail Online
    I just wanted to point out the slight of hand being used in some of the "green" propaganda on actual facts. Your approach w/ the pics targets the emotions, and can be used as a two-edged sword. But there isn't a 2nd edge to distortion of facts. The way I did that bar napkin calc also distorts the facts some...can't be help as they're all (sound) estimates. But at least I tried to biased it in favor of the PV and it's wasn't EVEN close to how badly that article did.
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Your calculations make no sense. The whole point of EROI is whether a power source can produce more power over its lifetime than is used to produce, maintain and decommission it. You have absolutely nothing in your calculations about the amount of energy needed to produce a solar panel. EROI is generally expressed as a ratio, for example a 6:1 EROI means over the lifetime of the panel, it will produce six times as much energy as was used to produce it.
    The clac points directly at what your articles claims a PV system can produce...1.59%
    This 1.59% is HUGE amounts, no doubt, so if we can do that I'm all for it!

    Unfortunately, the EROI isn't the metric used by ppl who decided if they should implement renewable energy or not, $$ROI is.

    Hey, I'm with you! We should be able to get off of fossil fuel. It'll just take a bigger chuck of each of our paychecks to do it, at least for now.

    You wave the word "*****" around like someone has committed a capital crime. Let me paint this picture. Energy cost is rising, while income (if any) is dropping. Green energy tech is expensive and our Xcel bill will have increase by 46% by the end of the next 5 years (Xcel figures). That $46 is now $60+. To you and I, maybe not much of an issue. But what about for those who are having difficulties paying the $46 now? You integrate a bunch of green tech and their bill jumps not to $60+, but to $80+, or $100+. What do they do? Doesn't this go directly to what you described as my unrealistic geographic economic analysis? Again, I repeat, the cost of energy has a direct correlation to the health of a nation's economy, its standard of living, and quality of life.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Where does the power come from to make those turbine blades? Certainly not from the wind turbines they're attached to.
    All of our factory's world wide have a turbine on site that powers the factory. The only reason our Windser plant does not is they were not allowed to because how close they are to the loveland airport. Our turbines are built to last 20 years and can be upgraded past that life span. I completely reject that idea that wind energy is product of oil and unsustainable. its not true. The petrochemicals now being used world wide can and will be replaced by biofuel sources like algae.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    The clac points directly at what your articles claims a PV system can produce...1.59%
    This 1.59% is HUGE amounts, no doubt, so if we can do that I'm all for it!

    Unfortunately, the EROI isn't the metric used by ppl who decided if they should implement renewable energy or not, $$ROI is.

    Hey, I'm with you! We should be able to get off of fossil fuel. It'll just take a bigger chuck of each of our paychecks to do it, at least for now.

    You wave the word "*****" around like someone has committed a capital crime. Let me paint this picture. Energy cost is rising, while income (if any) is dropping. Green energy tech is expensive and our Xcel bill will have increase by 46% by the end of the next 5 years (Xcel figures). That $46 is now $60+. To you and I, maybe not much of an issue. But what about for those who are having difficulties paying the $46 now? You integrate a bunch of green tech and their bill jumps not to $60+, but to $80+, or $100+. What do they do? Doesn't this go directly to what you described as my unrealistic geographic economic analysis? Again, I repeat, the cost of energy has a direct correlation to the health of a nation's economy, its standard of living, and quality of life.

    We have to make a leap of faith that shifting to alternatives will improve our economy, our standard of living and our quality of life. If our only measure is dollars, maybe the shift hurts, at least initially. If we have other measures, maybe everything improves, although I would submit that in the long run we will be better off dollar-wise, also. Our electric bill might have to increase by 46% in the next five years, and Xcel or whomever might blame that on the adoption of renewables, but ultimately the cost of coal and NG will also go up. The price of NG is extremely low right now because of massive drilling into shale plays, but now with a few years experience under their belts, the producers are finding that wells in the shale areas are playing out much faster than the traditional wells. We may very well convert a bunch of power plants to natural gas and end up regretting it in ten or twenty years when all the shale plays are played out, and we have to fall back on what is left. The BS from the NG industry about having 100 years worth of gas in the US has a bunch of assumptions under it, one being that shale wells have a lifecycle similar to traditional wells, the other being that consumption remains constant. If we convert power plants and transportation to NG, we have way less than 100 years, in fact, if we converted even half our transportation fleet to NG we would run out of it in about 40 years...not long after oil becomes too expensive.

    We can drill until we've drilled every square inch of the US, and in fact, I am certain that will happen. Our country has shown zero resolve in adopting a comprehensive energy policy, and instead we are just going to go business as usual until we hit the wall, then figure out what to do. Meanwhile Saudi Arabia with "oceans" of oil, and Europe with almost none, are both converting to wind, solar, geothermal and even wave power as fast as they can. There will be a tipping point where the energy costs of oil, coal and gas will be so high that we have no choice but convert, but the conundrum is that at that point, we have to use super-expensive oil, coal and gas to build the renewable infrastructure, which will make it much more expensive than if we phase it in gradually as we have been. Coal is not going to save us, because the extraction of coal uses massive amounts of diesel fuel and electricity. This is the "Receding Horizon" problem. We may see that developing and burning coal resources will save us from high oil and NG prices because it is cheaper, but by the time we get the coal out of the ground using oil and NG, the high cost of oil and NG has made the coal more expensive than originally predicted.

    My final point is this: if we have friendly or unfriendly sources willing to sell us oil at $100 a barrel, we should buy as much of it as we can afford. The oil in the ground in the US just becomes more and more valuable every day. Strategically, we should burn *other* countries' oil first, and then when the endgame hits, we still have some reserves of our own. When the crap really hits the fan, it is going to be very ugly. Basically we are going to be competing with China, India and Europe for Russia and OPEC's oil. They will have us by the gonads unless we can manage to save enough to run the military and a base economy on what is still left internally.

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    Just curious....raise your hand if your view on this topic has changed a result of this thread, especially the folks who favor crippling our economy with higher energy prices.....I didn't think so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    This is a right-wing talking point fallacy, and 10 seconds on Google can clear that up for you.
    Fancy pants number wrangling doesn't change the fact that there are no smelters fired by wind or solar power. Nor are there wind or solar powered equipment to haul the raw materials from the Earth.

    As for the right-wing comment, well, now we know the skew of your perspective.

    From where I stand, industrial solar and wind power are born of the same evils are oil, gas, and coal extraction. Sure, we can, maybe, solve our energy problems with these sources of power. However, the cost to flora and fauna is the same, possibly more. A well pad is drilled and reclaimed in a relatively short amount of time. A large solar complex or wind farm will be there for decades. And what happens in 30 years when the repair cost is too great and the wind farm is abandoned? (I'm thinking of the abandoned wind farms in Southern California and Hawaii).

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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Fancy pants number wrangling doesn't change the fact that there are no smelters fired by wind or solar power. Nor are there wind or solar powered equipment to haul the raw materials from the Earth.

    As for the right-wing comment, well, now we know the skew of your perspective.

    From where I stand, industrial solar and wind power are born of the same evils are oil, gas, and coal extraction. Sure, we can, maybe, solve our energy problems with these sources of power. However, the cost to flora and fauna is the same, possibly more. A well pad is drilled and reclaimed in a relatively short amount of time. A large solar complex or wind farm will be there for decades. And what happens in 30 years when the repair cost is too great and the wind farm is abandoned? (I'm thinking of the abandoned wind farms in Southern California and Hawaii).
    You may be shocked to know that most smelters are electric, which means they are indeed powered by wind and solar. Don't know what your point is there.

    You may also be shocked to know that electric draglines are often used in mining, which means part of the mining process is powered by wind and solar. And of course, there are a lot of conveyor belts that are electric. Again, I am missing your point.

    And you are apparently missing my point, which seemed pretty clear to me. Oil and Gas are finite resources, and if you are under 40 you will probably live to see the day when oil is not commonly used for transportation, and you will probably see the day when NG is not commonly used for household heat. We must come up with a different way of powering our society and economy. Period. We are much better off in the long run leaving the resources in the ground until we absolutely need them, for two major reasons: 1) strategically we are history if our enemies have access to oil and gas and we don't and 2) we may come up with better and less destructive ways of getting at the resources in the future. We need to start *now* to convert our society to renewables, because when oil hits $300 a barrel and our enemies are hoarding it, it is too late to convert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    You may be shocked to know that most smelters are electric, which means they are indeed powered by wind and solar. Don't know what your point is there.

    You may also be shocked to know that electric draglines are often used in mining, which means part of the mining process is powered by wind and solar. And of course, there are a lot of conveyor belts that are electric. Again, I am missing your point.

    And you are apparently missing my point, which seemed pretty clear to me. Oil and Gas are finite resources, and if you are under 40 you will probably live to see the day when oil is not commonly used for transportation, and you will probably see the day when NG is not commonly used for household heat. We must come up with a different way of powering our society and economy. Period. We are much better off in the long run leaving the resources in the ground until we absolutely need them, for two major reasons: 1) strategically we are history if our enemies have access to oil and gas and we don't and 2) we may come up with better and less destructive ways of getting at the resources in the future. We need to start *now* to convert our society to renewables, because when oil hits $300 a barrel and our enemies are hoarding it, it is too late to convert.
    It's the same tired industry. The issue is not where it is coming from. The issue is how we're using it. For instance, the energy it takes to run my computer to type this. It's totally unnecessary.

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    The problem is those who are blindly pro "alternative" energy ignore economic factors because they are blindly pro "alternative" energy for ideological reasons. The reality is that "alternative" energy is not yet ready for prime time as far as replacing traditional energy sources from an economic stand point. Ie. "alternative" energy costs too much to produce too little energy and simply cannot satisfy our energy needs.

    However, because they are so blindy pro "alternative" energy these people are willing to sacrifice American jobs, economic prosperity, and our standard of living by advocating policies which result in high energy costs. Their hope is that making traditional energy so costly they can force us all to use "alternative" energy. They do this under the guise of saving the world from global warming or pollution. However, it makes no sense because countries such as India and China rightly refuse to decimate their economies in the same way. So pollution is not decreased. At the same time, as fossil fuel prices go up, that makes it increasingly economical to tap into hard to reach fuel sources. But of course that causes the blindly pro "alternative" energy folks to attempt to ban efforts at tapping those newly economical traditional fuel reserves.

    So the battle continues mean while high energy costs drag down the American economy while countries like India and China continue to progress through their industrial revolutions. So they are needlessly dampening the American economy based on ideological views without appreciating the economics affects.

    Newly discovered shale oil reserves could rescue the economies of rust belt states such as Ohio. But the blindly pro "alternative energy" people could care less about the economies of places like Ohio. The proposed pipe line from Canada to Texas could create 20,000 high paying jobs. But the blindly pro "alternative" energy folks don't care about jobs aside from their own "green" job.

    Yes, we should continue efforts to develop "alternative" energy but we should not sacrifice our current economy to do so. But blindly pro "alternative" energy folks don't think outside their ideology.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Again, I am missing your point.

    And you are apparently missing my point, which seemed pretty clear to me. Oil and Gas are finite resources, and if you are under 40 you will probably live to see the day when oil is not commonly used for transportation
    Ironically as anti-fossil fuel policies drive the price of fossil fuels up, that makes it increasingly economical for hard to reach fuel reserves to be tapped. In conjunction with that, technological advances make it possible to find and tap fuel sources which were impossible to tap in the past. For example, a large natural gas reserve called the Utica Shale has been discovered. Other reserves have been discovered and new ones continue to be discovered. We are not running out of fossil fuel.

    This isn't to say we shouldn't develop "alternative" energy. But we don't have to develop "alternative" energy to the exclusion of fossil fuels or at the expense of our economy. But pro "alternative" energy folks apparently aren't satisfied with the pace at which American is adopting "alternative" energy so they want to artificially constrict the amount of fossil fuels at our disposal.

    But if "alternative" energy development isn't progressing fast enough it the "alternative" energy researchers' own d*mned fault. They get enough government money. They need to work harder, or get smarter people involved. Kick it up a notch if you want to compete. Its a dog eat dog world out there and you're wearing milk bone under wear. You need to work harder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    You may be shocked to know that most smelters are electric, which means they are indeed powered by wind and solar. Don't know what your point is there.
    We live in one of the sunniest states in America. Why is the Colorado government requiring that Xcel migrate their power plants from coal to natural gas and not solar?

    I think the point the poster was making was that the reality is "alternative" energy is not yet ready to replace fossil fuels. Honestly I hope it one day will be able to replace fossil fuels, but if the economics don't yet make sense, it is ridiculous to attempt to force the issue by artificially constricting our access to fossil fuels. You might think differently if you were a truck driver, or a construction worker whose job is at risk due to economic problems. But you evidently have a "green " job which insulates you from these factors unlike the rest of us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    Ironically as anti-fossil fuel policies drive the price of fossil fuels up, that makes it increasingly economical for hard to reach fuel reserves to be tapped. In conjunction with that, technological advances make it possible to find and tap fuel sources which were impossible to tap in the past. For example, a large natural gas reserve called the Utica Shale has been discovered. Other reserves have been discovered and new ones continue to be discovered. We are not running out of fossil fuel.

    This isn't to say we shouldn't develop "alternative" energy. But we don't have to develop "alternative" energy to the exclusion of fossil fuels or at the expense of our economy. But pro "alternative" energy folks apparently aren't satisfied with the pace at which American is adopting "alternative" energy so they want to artificially constrict the amount of fossil fuels at our disposal.

    But if "alternative" energy development isn't progressing fast enough it the "alternative" energy researchers' own d*mned fault. They get enough government money. They need to work harder, or get smarter people involved. Kick it up a notch if you want to compete. Its a dog eat dog world out there and you're wearing milk bone under wear. You need to work harder.
    What about the billions in tax breaks and subsidies the oil industry gets as they make record profits? I'm not asking for our energy prices to rise artificially. I just want the price of fossil fuels to stop being artificially lower. I think its time they fend for them selfs.

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    Are you in favor of increased drilling in the Gulf of Mexico? Are you in favor of drilling in ANWR? Are you in favor of building the Pipe line from Canada to Texas? Are you in favor of Fracking? Be honest with yourself. If you are not in favor of these things then you are, despite not admitting it or perhaps without realizing it, you are in favor of artificially high energy prices. How do you feel about SUVs?

    I am a free market person. I think companies and people should compete. I am against subsidies. I am against price ceilings. I am against price floors. I won't defend anyone receiving a subsidy. But oil company subsidies are not the reason "alternative" energy is not more competitive. Stay focused.

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    What are the best tires for Front Range Tar Sand riding?

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    We don't allow tires in Colorado. Tires are a product made from oil by products.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser View Post
    Not when I spend the rest of the week conserving. And not when I spend every day making wind turbine blades so you and every one els in this country can have a future.
    Yep, you are still a hypocrite, and the reply above justifying your means is pathetic--cognitive dissonance.

    Thanks for saving the world for us!
    Last edited by lidarman; 12-20-2011 at 10:25 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman View Post
    Yep, you are still a hypocrite, and the reply above justifying your means is pathetic--cognitive dissonance.

    Thanks for saving the world for us!
    And what do you do that you get to judge me?

    I am a realist and I know that oil dominates the economy and the world right now. But I also don't have to like it. I am also a production worker so I don't have the money to just go off the grid or to buy an electric car. I drive a PZEV car I turn lights out when I'm not in the room. I try to ride my bike as much as I can. I try to combine trips when I do use my car. I do my part. I fond hypocrite or pathetic to be rather strong words when I do more then most people do. And your welcome at lest I can feel that I am trying to make the world a better place. Its reality not fantasy. And it puts a smile on my face every day when a new blade go out the factory door.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser View Post
    And what do you do that you get to judge me?

    I am a realist and I know that oil dominates the economy and the world right now. But I also don't have to like it. I am also a production worker so I don't have the money to just go off the grid or to buy an electric car. I drive a PZEV car I turn lights out when I'm not in the room. I try to ride my bike as much as I can. I try to combine trips when I do use my car. I do my part. I fond hypocrite or pathetic to be rather strong words when I do more then most people do. And your welcome at lest I can feel that I am trying to make the world a better place. Its reality not fantasy. And it puts a smile on my face every day when a new blade go out the factory door.

    Do what you can. Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman View Post
    Yep, you are still a hypocrite, and the reply above justifying your means is pathetic--cognitive dissonance.

    Thanks for saving the world for us!
    feel better now?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser View Post
    And what do you do that you get to judge me?

    I am a realist and I know that oil dominates the economy and the world right now. But I also don't have to like it. I am also a production worker so I don't have the money to just go off the grid or to buy an electric car. I drive a PZEV car I turn lights out when I'm not in the room. I try to ride my bike as much as I can. I try to combine trips when I do use my car. I do my part. I fond hypocrite or pathetic to be rather strong words when I do more then most people do. And your welcome at lest I can feel that I am trying to make the world a better place. Its reality not fantasy. And it puts a smile on my face every day when a new blade go out the factory door.
    +1 to you sir... It is a shame that more people subscribe to the short-sighted belief that because there is no immediate and tangible benefit, it is not worth doing anything to try and conserve.
    While I am at it, regarding the news story above, the Mail is a notoriously unreliable news source, with a proven record of misleading photo-journalism. I am not saying that the story is untrue, just that they know how to pander to emotions.
    China and India are also rightly notorious for their poor record of minimising pollution, but the "if you can't beat 'em" mentality that abounds in certain people in this country is in my opinion, just plain wrong. It seems that even the most minor sacrifice in our "standard of living" is anathema to some. Right now in AZ. gas is hovering just over 3 bucks a gallon. My sister in the UK pays over 10 bucks a gallon, (most of which is tax). She has a pretty good standard of living even so, and is a pretty normal person working for a living. And before the inevitable howls of outrage at the possibility of the same happening here, I am not advocating this as a solution, just that many of us can stand to cut down our consumption, and pay a little more for certain things if that is a price needed to pay for what I see as an increase in a long term standard of living. I will leave it up to you statisticians to shoot me down in a volley of graphs and a burst of machine gun numerals that will no doubt disprove/prove whatever necessary.
    It's all Here. Now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hitek79 View Post
    What are the best tires for Front Range Tar Sand riding?
    There's tar sand in CO Front Range? Let's build some wind and PV farms so we can power the the refineries and get at that biatch, yeah?
    I drive a little Civic, but damn if she's not a friggin' gas lush! But then, I consider anything under 40mpg a gas lush...
    Last edited by Pau11y; 12-21-2011 at 07:13 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    Just curious....raise your hand if your view on this topic has changed a result of this thread, especially the folks who favor crippling our economy with higher energy prices.....I didn't think so.
    It may not have changed, but I personally do like seeing where all sides are coming from and the things ppl post do provide me a bit of digging focus into their argument(s).
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    It may not have changed, but I personally do like seeing where all sides are coming from and the things ppl post do provide me a bit of digging focus into their argument(s).
    That's reasonable. But I don't think the pro "alternative" energy people are open to considering the economic ramifications of the policies they advocate. Actually if they really want to build lasting support for their views, they need to quit advocating policies which hamper our economy and start moderating the policies they advocate. A lot of people who are reasonable and don't want to "destroy the Earth" are very mad that the economy has been so bad for so long and are not happy with "green" policies which result in high energy costs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    We live in one of the sunniest states in America. Why is the Colorado government requiring that Xcel migrate their power plants from coal to natural gas and not solar?
    There was an article on this published a few weeks ago. You might google it.

    Something to do with the new scrubbers being so efficient that it made sticking with natural gas more cost effective.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    That's reasonable. But I don't think the pro "alternative" energy people are open to considering the economic ramifications of the policies they advocate. Actually if they really want to build lasting support for their views, they need to quit advocating policies which hamper our economy and start moderating the policies they advocate. A lot of people who are reasonable and don't want to "destroy the Earth" are very mad that the economy has been so bad for so long and are not happy with "green" policies which result in high energy costs.
    I know quite a few people that have embraced "alternative" energy and their energy costs have gone way down. Solar panels for electricity and hot water, passive solar for heat, less driving, more pedaling, walking or public transportation. Higher MPG vehicle when they do drive. It adds up to a lot and it's hardly a radical lifestyle change, just a commitment to be mindful of being less wasteful. Hell, just changing over to CF bulbs and closing my thermal blinds at night and opening the south facing ones during the day has made a not insignificant.

    It would be a tragedy to pollute the air we breath and water we drink land tear the s**t out of so much of our land, remaining beautiful places for short term profit and resistance to change when a lot of little things can add up to big savings in energy.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    There was an article on this published a few weeks ago. You might google it.

    Something to do with the new scrubbers being so efficient that it made sticking with natural gas more cost effective.
    Meh... I don't know about this.
    I work for a place that has developed one of the most advanced off-gas scrubbing system to date and I know for a fact that scrubber tech hasn't changed a whole lot in a LONG time!
    The switch to NG simply requires less scrubbing as NG burns pretty cleanly...no particulates, mercury, etc...
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    I want to ask a question of the people that appear to be in favor of this drilling.

    Do you believe because oil is an important commodity, we should drill for it wherever it is found?

    Do you believe that the best possible use for any given piece of land is to extract what minerals lie beneath?
    Whatever the intrinsic or perceived value of land is in its natural state, the best possible use is extractive?

    Do you understand that the price of oil is not a simple supply/demand relationship, it is manipulated in a variety of ways. Therefore small drilling operations such as this will have little to no effect on the price you ultimately pay for petroleum products?

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    It is pretty disheartening to read so many posts glossing over the real issue that both oil and NG are finite resources that will become essentially unobtainable to the average person within most of our lifetimes due to cost. People are worried about their next buck, and not about the livelihood of their children or grandchildren.

    There are many precedents for this kind of total resource annihilation; the most parallel is the decimation of the bison population in North America in the 19th century. Bison roamed the plains in unimaginable numbers, and they became raw material for entire industries in the early-mid 1800's. A few people sounded the alarm when the populations started declining, to no avail. The absolutely amazing irony is that what some of you have posted are the *exact* same arguments which were used against instituting *any* kind of controls on the bison hunt: the supplies are endless, the economy would suffer, families would go hungry, etc. etc. No action was taken until the herd was virtually wiped out, and then guess what happened? The economy suffered and families went hungry.

    The major difference between oil and the bison is that oil is so much more irreplaceable and important that when the crash comes, the pain will be much more universal. When the bison were eliminated, cattle were easily substituted. There is *no* substitute for oil. It is a completely unique substance on earth for which there is *no* substitute. The closest we can come is to make fuel from shale or coal, but both of these require more energy than we get out of the end products, and both carry massive environmental penalties.

    Meanwhile, we as a society change our ways to require less oil only under duress, which has already had devastating economic impacts. The crash in 2008 and the current economic malaise are both directly correlated to the price of oil exceeding $90 a barrel. Most economists agree that our society in its current form cannot prosper with oil prices this high, but rather than try to switch to alternatives as fast as we can, we engage in futile efforts to drill and pump what we have left under the misguided fantasy that the US can somehow lower world oil prices. We only produce 7-8% of the world's oil at this point, and that number is never going to go up appreciably, because we have already depleted the easy stuff. The game we have to play now is to drill many, many lower producing wells into marginal reservoirs, and use mega-expensive techniques to coax every last drop out. Even with all of this science and effort we can barely keep pace with the depletion of the wells already in production in the US. Meanwhile, world demand continues to rise while the exporting countries continue to see declines in the amounts they can export.

    So when you complain about gas hitting $2-3-4-5-6-7 per gallon, just consider that the price right now at about $3 per gallon is the *lowest* price you will see for the remainder of your lifetime. Gas is only this cheap because all the gasoline storage in the US is full, and shutting down a refinery is a very expensive proposition. So, we are actually importing crude, refining it, and exporting the end products while keeping the price low in the US to try to give people an incentive to use more so that the refineries don't have to shut down. However, because the price of oil is so high, $2 per gallon gasoline is history, and when the economy rebounds, $3 will also be seen for the last time as oil prices go permanently above $100 per barrel.

    We can make a lot of money with oil at $100 a barrel while depleting the last of our resources. Just remember the lesson we should have learned with the bison in a few short years when we are struggling to produce 4 million barrels per day and those few countries left who are willing and able to sell us their oil get $300 or more per barrel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman View Post
    Yep, you are still a hypocrite, and the reply above justifying your means is pathetic--cognitive dissonance.

    Thanks for saving the world for us!

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    It is pretty disheartening to read so many posts glossing over the real issue that both oil and NG are finite resources that will become essentially unobtainable to the average person within most of our lifetimes due to cost. People are worried about their next buck, and not about the livelihood of their children or grandchildren.
    I guess all that depends on whether or not you believe oil comes from decomposed dinosaurs, or not. There is evidence to support the abiotic oil theory.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm View Post
    I know quite a few people that have embraced "alternative" energy and their energy costs have gone way down. Solar panels for electricity and hot water, passive solar for heat, less driving, more pedaling, walking or public transportation. Higher MPG vehicle when they do drive. It adds up to a lot and it's hardly a radical lifestyle change, just a commitment to be mindful of being less wasteful. Hell, just changing over to CF bulbs and closing my thermal blinds at night and opening the south facing ones during the day has made a not insignificant.

    It would be a tragedy to pollute the air we breath and water we drink land tear the s**t out of so much of our land, remaining beautiful places for short term profit and resistance to change when a lot of little things can add up to big savings in energy.
    Some things are affordable, others...hybrid electric cars, PV panels and power electronics, renovating your house...not so much.
    "Doing what you can" means very different things to different ppl. For the ppl that went off-grid, what was their initial cost to let them do that. Will their $$ROI be recovered during the life-span of their equipment?

    I mean, as for us cyclists who have a several thousand dollar bike (some moar than a 1/2 dzn of such bikes)...we don't need to be talking about $$ROI actually, yeah?
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    great thread, would read again

    hypocrites are teh best

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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    I guess all that depends on whether or not you believe oil comes from decomposed dinosaurs, or not. There is evidence to support the abiotic oil theory.
    Spare me. There is not a single oil field on earth that has not depleted eventually. The "abiotic oil" theory is as stupid as Astrology.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Spare me. There is not a single oil field on earth that has not depleted eventually. The "abiotic oil" theory is as stupid as Astrology.


    Abiotic Synthesis Of Methane: New Evidence Supports 19th-Century Idea On Formation Of Oil And Gas

    Hydrocarbons deep within Earth: New computational study reveals how


    Have you ever seen a bug turn a dinosaur into oil? didn't think so. It's just a theory.

    Oh here you go.

    One more.
    Fossils From Animals And Plants Are Not Necessary For Crude Oil And Natural Gas, Swedish Researchers Find
    Last edited by UncleTrail; 12-21-2011 at 12:21 PM.

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    From your first link:

    "The results "strongly suggest" that some methane could form strictly from chemical reactions in a variety of chemical environments. This study further highlights the role of reaction pathways and fluid immiscibility in the extent of hydrocarbon formation at extreme conditions simulating deep subsurface."


    Good luck powering your life on a trickle of methane.


    From your second link:

    "Geologists and geochemists believe that nearly all (more than 99 percent) of the hydrocarbons in commercially produced crude oil and natural gas are formed by the decomposition of the remains of living organisms, which were buried under layers of sediments in Earth's crust, a region approximately 5-10 miles below Earth's surface.
    But hydrocarbons of purely chemical deep crustal or mantle origin (abiogenic) could occur in some geologic settings, such as rifts or subduction zones said Galli, a senior author on the study."



    So yeah, that 0.5% percent is super significant.



    There is also a theoretical possibility that attaching methane collection bags to the anuses of cattle will solve part of our future energy problems. However, this will not replace conventional oil.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    From your first link:
    There is also a theoretical possibility that attaching methane collection bags to the anuses of cattle will solve part of our future energy problems. However, this will not replace conventional oil.
    Maybe we're not drilling deep enough.... doh.

    Here I'll help you out a little.
    Fossils From Animals And Plants Are Not Necessary For Crude Oil And Natural Gas, Swedish Researchers Find
    "He adds that there is no way that fossil oil, with the help of gravity or other forces, could have seeped down to a depth of 10.5 kilometers in the state of Texas, for example, which is rich in oil deposits. As Vladimir Kutcherov sees it, this is further proof, alongside his own research findings, of the genesis of these energy sources – that they can be created in other ways than via fossils. This has long been a matter of lively discussion among scientists."
    Last edited by UncleTrail; 12-21-2011 at 12:42 PM.

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    Who really cares where oil comes from, at least pertaining to the original post. What matters is everyone on this site are mountain bikers, correct? Do you like breathing fresh air and not having to ride with an oxygen tanks or masks (see China about masks)? A friend of mine who raced at tri short course worlds a few months ago became very ill as the pollution was so bad her asthma kick in big time not to mention a family friend who designs mineral processing facilities in China is always getting sick over there. Not the type of place I want to live.

    Would you like your potential areas to ride be decreased or increased?

    Oh, and regarding where oil comes from, again not relevant to this post but to give my $0.02, ever drive up 25 around the Longmont/Loveland area? Notice the rigs moving sometimes and not moving others? Why? The wells are so old they have to put the rigs on timers to let the oil seep back into the well so there is something to pump out. Oil will be gone or at least not as readily available as it is now. How will that affect our economy?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyinCO View Post
    Who really cares where oil comes from, at least pertaining to the original post. What matters is everyone on this site are mountain bikers, correct? Do you like breathing fresh air and not having to ride with an oxygen tanks or masks (see China about masks)? A friend of mine who raced at tri short course worlds a few months ago became very ill as the pollution was so bad her asthma kick in big time not to mention a family friend who designs mineral processing facilities in China is always getting sick over there. Not the type of place I want to live.

    Would you like your potential areas to ride be decreased or increased?

    Oh, and regarding where oil comes from, again not relevant to this post but to give my $0.02, ever drive up 25 around the Longmont/Loveland area? Notice the rigs moving sometimes and not moving others? Why? The wells are so old they have to put the rigs on timers to let the oil seep back into the well so there is something to pump out. Oil will be gone or at least not as readily available as it is now. How will that affect our economy?
    Thank you. I don't give a rats A** where it comes from. Burning it is putting massive amounts is CO2 in to the atmosphere. And more then likely we are close of not already past the tipping point. Its high time we sit up and look at what oil is doing to us and the environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyinCO View Post
    Would you like your potential areas to ride be decreased or increased?
    Depends on your priorities.

    It was State School Board land that was set aside to provide an affordable education to those who don't have trust funds. They purchased the land knowing the SLB still had mineral rights.

    So do you want your kids to have an affordable quality education or not?

    I'll choose my kids education over a few more miles of trail to ride. Sorry. That's what it's there for. Funding public education.

  71. #71
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    It is a matter of degrees. Do I want drilling in the middle of Fruita's riding areas? Nope. On Long's Peak? Nope. But in areas less scenic, drilling is fine so long as the companies follow the best environmentally friendly practices available to them. Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico? Yes. Drilling in Ohio? Yes. ANWR away from the scenic areas? Yep.

    Am I in favor of the continued research into possible alternatives to fossil fuel? Of course. But the problem is the "green" people are willing to go to extreme lengths. The ends justify the means to them. They are willing to sacrifice our economy and standard of living. Most reasonable people whose jobs are impacted by adverse economic conditions are not happy with such policies, and yes, every bit of fossil fuel extracted does impact the world wide market. More supply equals lower energy costs. Lower energy costs cause most products to cost less. Its a matter of degrees. The adamant green people, of which there are obvious examples in this thread, are willing to sacrifice the economy. That's not a way to win support for your ideas regardless of the fancy argument points you use on this forum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    It is a matter of degrees. Do I want drilling in the middle of Fruita's riding areas? Nope. On Long's Peak? Nope. But in areas less scenic, drilling is fine so long as the companies follow the best environmentally friendly practices available to them. Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico? Yes. Drilling in Ohio? Yes. ANWR away from the scenic areas? Yep.

    Am I in favor of the continued research into possible alternatives to fossil fuel? Of course. But the problem is the "green" people are willing to go to extreme lengths. The ends justify the means to them. They are willing to sacrifice our economy and standard of living. Most reasonable people whose jobs are impacted by adverse economic conditions are not happy with such policies, and yes, every bit of fossil fuel extracted does impact the world wide market. More supply equals lower energy costs. Lower energy costs cause most products to cost less. Its a matter of degrees. The adamant green people, of which there are obvious examples in this thread, are willing to sacrifice the economy. That's not a way to win support for your ideas regardless of the fancy argument points you use on this forum.
    So drilling in 'Outer' Mongolia is fine? Seriously, I am sure many people in those less scenic areas would disagree with you.
    Personally, Hayduke lives in my book. I don't buy into the idea that the 'economy' of which you speak is sacrosanct. Neither do I buy the idea that the 'Greens' are bent on destroying it, nor do I believe that it is in fact being damaged in the way you think it might be.
    It's all Here. Now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    It is a matter of degrees. Do I want drilling in the middle of Fruita's riding areas? Nope. On Long's Peak? Nope. But in areas less scenic, drilling is fine so long as the companies follow the best environmentally friendly practices available to them. Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico? Yes. Drilling in Ohio? Yes. ANWR away from the scenic areas? Yep.

    Am I in favor of the continued research into possible alternatives to fossil fuel? Of course. But the problem is the "green" people are willing to go to extreme lengths. The ends justify the means to them. They are willing to sacrifice our economy and standard of living. Most reasonable people whose jobs are impacted by adverse economic conditions are not happy with such policies, and yes, every bit of fossil fuel extracted does impact the world wide market. More supply equals lower energy costs. Lower energy costs cause most products to cost less. Its a matter of degrees. The adamant green people, of which there are obvious examples in this thread, are willing to sacrifice the economy. That's not a way to win support for your ideas regardless of the fancy argument points you use on this forum.

    Good God. I don't know how to make this any more clear, but I'll try again. I won't go over 8th grade.

    1) There is only so much oil on the planet.
    2) The combination of population increasing, and formerly backwards societies getting cars, cause the number of people wanting oil to rise constantly.
    3) 93% of the oil production on earth is *not* in the US.
    4) The more oil we pump, the less we have.
    5) We use so much crude oil we can't possibly produce even 50% of our consumption, because we already used too much of it up and what is left is really hard to get out of the ground.
    6) The majority of countries that have oil hate us and want to see us die.
    7) Oil is essentially sold in a big auction.
    8) As with all auctions, the less of what is being sold, the higher the price, because there are more that want it than have it.


    People have every right to worry about economic impacts of using oil vs. renewables, but what they should be worried about is why we are not converting off of oil fast enough. Oil today is $98 a barrel in the US and $108 in Europe. The high price is one of the *main* factors impacting the world economy. Do you really think that if we had some magic ability to open a spigot and flood the world market with oil that we would not have done that already? Obama tried to sway world prices a few weeks ago by making a huge show of announcing that the US was going to tap the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, and it did *nothing* to the price of oil. We can't even produce half of the crude oil that we use in this country, so why would the world fall for that? The *only* way the US can cause the price of oil to move is to use *less* of it, so that the auction price will go down, but only if China/India/Europe doesn't suck it up behind us. All of the drilling and all of the fracking of the past decade, tens of thousands of new wells and tens of billions in investment has succeeded in raising US production less than 2%, which translates into an insignificant amount of oil on the world markets. Why is this so difficult to understand? US oil production has very little impact on world prices, because we produce so little. US demand has a huge impact, because we consume so much.

    I'll net it out in case you haven't followed along: oil prices will be on a rising slope for the rest of our lives, because world demand is constantly rising while world production has been essentially flat for the past five years, and at some point will begin a continual decline. We can only make an impact on the demand side. Our economy is permanently screwed unless we can switch to different modes of living. Will the different modes be more expensive than oil at $100 a barrel? Probably. The question is whether the alternatives are more expensive than oil at $2-3-400 a barrel, because that is where oil will end up, *regardless* of how much we drill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Good God. I don't know how to make this any more clear, but I'll try again. I won't go over 8th grade.
    Wow. You are an arrogant azz. You really expect to win people over that way?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    Of course. But the problem is the "green" people are willing to go to extreme lengths. The ends justify the means to them. They are willing to sacrifice our economy and standard of living. Most reasonable people whose jobs are impacted by adverse economic conditions are not happy with such policies...


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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    So drilling in 'Outer' Mongolia is fine? Seriously, I am sure many people in those less scenic areas would disagree with you.
    Personally, Hayduke lives in my book. I don't buy into the idea that the 'economy' of which you speak is sacrosanct. Neither do I buy the idea that the 'Greens' are bent on destroying it, nor do I believe that it is in fact being damaged in the way you think it might be.
    That depends. The people in those areas may welcome to lease income they receive for their land. Some people would not welcome the development. There would likely be plenty of debate. But ubber pro "alternative" energy types can only see your own view point to the exclusion of all other factors.

    If you are in favor of higher fossil fuel prices as a method for some how forcing the use of or accelerating the development of "alternative" energy then you are, indeed without admitting it, in favor or curtailing our economy. The fact remains that artificially constricting fossil fuel supply causes the price of most everything to rise. Rising prices without a corresponding rise in GDP leads to a decreased standard of living. It doesn't matter if you "intend" this or not, that is what happens.

    Listen, as I've said before, I am in favor of the development of "alternative" energy. Heck I think I think it would be great if we could totally replace fossil fuels tomorrow, and I don't care if someone gets rich inventing the technology to make that possible. But the reality is that "alternative" energy has not reach a point where that is possible due to the cost of producing "alternative" energy.

    Where we differ is that I don't want to try to force people to give up their standard of living so we can accelerate the adoption of "alternative" energy when the economics of doing so don't yet make sense. By restricting access to fossil fuel energy reserves and claiming we are running out of fossil fuels when we aren't that's what you are doing.

    You can't have it both ways. Why are you in favor of the use of "alternative" energy today when we cannot replace 100% of our energy needs with "alternative" energy? Because every bit counts. Right? Less pollution, right? It all counts. Well its the same with fossil fuels, every bit counts. Every bit of fossil fuel that we extract and put on the market, whether it is extracted from reserves in the US or elsewhere, is put on the world wide market (just like that arrogant azz said in the post above). Every little bit of increase in supply pushes prices downward. It doesn't matter who buys it. The US or China. But by disallowing us from tapping reserves in the US, we are artificially decreasing supply. Actually the minute the government says they will permit drilling in a large area such as ANWR the commodities market will push the price down. Even with the fuel still in the ground. That is because the commodities market is forward looking.

    I am not alone in not wanting to artificially decrease our standard of living by artificially constrict fossil fuel supply for an "alternative" energy agenda. You people in favor of that want it all. You want to force everything and everyone to do it your way to the exclusion of people's economic quality of life. The poster above's arrogance is a good demonstration of exactly that.

    Continue to research and develop "alternative" energy. But kick it up a notch. Get smarter people because if you need to manipulate the market to achieve your agenda you clearly aren't making quick enough progress. You need smarter people involved. You're taking to long.

    Sincerely,

    Arvada's 8th grade science class.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post

    Continue to research and develop "alternative" energy. But kick it up a notch. Get smarter people because if you need to manipulate the market to achieve your agenda you clearly aren't making quick enough progress. You need smarter people involved. You're taking to long.

    Sincerely,

    Arvada's 8th grade science class.
    So... you are volunteering to work on behalf of the alternative fuel agenda?

    I take your points, and I trust you are sincere in your view that you would welcome the rapid take up of alternative energy sources. Therefore I cannot understand your reluctance to fully embrace the necessary measures to try and speed up this process. These necessary measures must stem from the initial understanding that the 'drill baby drill' mentality is just postponing the inevitable. Not to mention the fact that not only are the planets' oil resources a finite entity, but areas of beauty and fragile ecosystems are being destroyed at a rate that will leave our descendants sadly lacking in meaningful community with nature. This is no small thing in itself.
    The debate on the ANWR makes for some interesting reading, and shows a complete lack of empathy from some proponents of the scheme with the true nature of the area. To them it is a 'barren wasteland' with few, if any redeeming factors. Also, it is a long way from DC, or indeed the Colorado Front Range, so that's OK then. Those pesky Eskimos will gladly take the money because they are human in their ability to be bought off. Everyone has their price.
    I wonder where this might stop if this extraction is permitted. Who will make up the "Scenic Area" Police deciding what area is too scenic to be destroyed? Are you volunteering again?
    Please do not insult the collective intelligence of the alternative energy lobby as a whole by saying they need to get smarter. By that do you mean devious and underhand? There are many highly intelligent and selfless people involved, and I fervently hope that the rest of the population of, not just this, country figure out that there may just be a better way to move forward than by raping the planet, and ones' fellow man.

    Sorry for the rant, but I would like to think that my children's children may have a place to ride their bikes in wonderment at the quiet splendour of our natural world, as I have been lucky enough to do in my lifetime.
    It's all Here. Now.

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    What I mean by getting smarter is that the "alternative" energy people need to make more progress faster from an engineering stand point. They need more successful scientists. Progress is too little and too slow.

    I along with many others are not willing to sacrifice my standard of living to speed up the process of migrating to "alternative" energy by artificially suppressing the use of fossil fuels because its not the use of fossil fuels that is the problem its the lack of progress in the development of "alternative" energy which is the problem.

    Indeed, progress has been made in the development of "alternative" energy, but not enough to bring the price of "alternative" energy down enough that it makes sense to use it in lieu of fossil fuels at a level necessary to truly begin to replace fossil fuels.

    A lot of folks like to say that is not fair that CEO's make so much more then the rest of us. Well, I don't think its fair that past generations of Americans were not asked to sacrifice their standard of living to decrease the use of fossil fuels and suddenly this generation is being asked to sacrifice their standard of living. I don't think its fair that other countries such as China and India are going to experience the benefits of cheap energy while Americans cannot also experience the benefits of abundant cheap energy and the positive effects it can have on our standard of living. (I understand fuel is traded on a commodities market world wide. Cheap is relative. If we allowed more drilling fossil fuel supply would increase and exert downward pressure on price here in the US).

    Basically what anti-fossil fuel policies are attempting to do is not to hasten the development of "alternative" energy but to raise the price of fossil fuels so that without the requisite progress being made, "alternative" energy can be artificially made to be more attractive from an economic stand point when compared to fossil fuel. I am not in favor of that because it adversely affects our generation's standard of living.

    If they are honest with themselves, the anti-fossil fuel folks will realize they are operating out of a perspective of fear. Fear that fossil fuel prices will be so low that they can never compete. Fear that if new methods such as fracking are allowed we may never truely run out of fossil fuels. Anti-fossil fuel folks are on the defensive rather then making technological progress necessary to compete successfully against fossil fuel which would be offensive.

    The ironic problem is that the more the "alternative" energy industry relies on crutches like artificially restricting access to fossil fuels and trying to get the average person to believe falsely that we are running out of fossil fuels, the less likely it is that the "alternative" energy industry will develop the necessary technology to succeed on the massive scale needed to replace fossil fuels. Competition breeds success. Not all technologies will succeed but competitive pressure causes the successes to emerge.

    Fear mongering and arrogance like that demonstrated by the poster above only shows the "alternative" energy industry's insecurity. They are not going to win over wide spread support from the average person with an arrogant approach to opposition like that. By the way if I have came off like I was calling anyone any name at any point within this thread I sincerely apologize with the exception of calling out that arrogant guy on his arrogance.

    I'll close this post with this idea. The cat is out of the bag. Its there. Everyone who is reasonable and is paying attention knows that fossil fuels are polluting the Earth. Reasonable people don't like it and would like it to slow down if not stop. This is not falling off the reasonable person's radar. But the "alternative" energy industry needs to moderate their approach. They need to tone down their rhetoric in order to gain the support they want. They are taking the approach of trying to shout down and demean all opposition to their approach. To fear monger and manipulate economics through restrictive regulations.

    The "alternative" energy industry needs to realize it can't be all their way and they can't get everything they want tomorrow. Technological progress is the only way for them to succeed. Their current tone and tactics aren't going to get things to the place WE want them to be pollution wise because the average person want's to reduce pollution but also wants a decent economy. They want to be able to make enough money to send their kids to college. People want to be able to retire at some point. They want to save and invest successfully. They want and deserve the same economic opportunities past generations had. This all requires a prosperous economy, not a stagflation economy sacked with artificially high energy costs that inflate prices and slow down economic commerce. That is why I am not in favor of forcing people to use "alternative" energy today through higher prices when otherwise fossil fuels would be used because "alternative" energy is not yet ready to replace fossil fuels.

    Left to compete against fossil fuels, when "alternative" energy is ready someone is going to be rightly made the most wealthy person in human history for creating the technology which gets us off fossil fuels and I say good for that person. But that technology has not been created yet and we are not at that point.

    By the way, the reason I put "alternative" energy in quotes is because to me, its all energy. I don't like the way the terms "green" and "alternative" energy are being used as marketing ploys while fossil fuels are unnecessarily maligned. Its all just energy.
    Last edited by 2wheelsnotfour; 12-21-2011 at 08:31 PM.

  79. #79
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    The negative rep comment I got after I pointed out the hypocrisy by the OP..

    "u sound like a d!ckhead"

    Thanks for the compliment.

    Quote Originally Posted by brokefork View Post
    feel better now?
    Always feel great...love when you post.

    BTW, the OP claims that Oil rigs are endangering his escape from civilization, yet claims to work for a wind turbine company that if you think about it, can be unsightly in themselves. So what is the real issue the OP is trying to convey? Is it about oil drilling or the unsightly nature of temporary rigs versus permanent windmills? BTW, you can see a huge wind farm from Soapstone....ironic!

    I make no judgement on whether we should keep drilling for oil or not...no wait, I hate oil drilling because it's showing how our citizens are dependent on oil and are decadent. However, my real reason for posting is to point out the hypocrisy and the whining .....but the Colorado forum is full of whining so I guess I was in error in biting on the many hooks.

    <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y228/lidarman/Bike%20Rides/Soapstone/DSC_0442bw.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>
    Last edited by lidarman; 12-21-2011 at 09:35 PM.

  80. #80
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    ... and if we just ...

    And we didn't land a man on the moon, Kennedy was a inside job--so was 9-11, and Cold fusion is real along with the government hiding UFOs. Awesome.




















  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    Wow. You are an arrogant azz. You really expect to win people over that way?

    You said you didn't want fancy arguments. I obliged. Your subsequent post shows that you are *still* completely missing the point, so I give up.

  82. #82
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    ....and you, my friend, may have resigned yourself to not winning me over, but in addition to not winning me over you aren't supporting your cause graciously nor maturely. You're arrogance is a detriment to your cause.

  83. #83
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    lulz

    You should have responded in crayon, Rich.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    ....and you, my friend, may have resigned yourself to not winning me over, but in addition to not winning me over you aren't supporting your cause graciously nor maturely. You're arrogance is a detriment to your cause.
    You're like a small child crying and stamping his feet in the playground: "No Fair!" Not fair that everyone else gets cheap energy and we do not. Not fair that China is now doing what the US has done for years and years, and is getting all the pies. Sheesh!

    To the guy talking about negative rep up there, get over it, whatever side of the fence you are on, if you voice your opinion there will be a flurry of anonymous neg-reppers bonking you on the back of the head when you are not looking like kids in the schoolyard. Too cowardly to say anything in public. I reserve utter contempt for them, anonymously of course, and I collect petty insults!
    It's all Here. Now.

  85. #85
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    ...On that note I am out of here. There are no easy answers to this debate. It is pretty pointless to continue this here when we are so disparate in our opinions. I have taken a lot of what has been said and will give it some thought, but I do believe deeply in the need for us all to find "an easier, softer way". I am passionate about conserving the resources we have, be they under or on the ground. The United States is my adopted home, and it is one of the most beautiful and diverse places on this earth. I hope it can stay that way, but listening to some of the opinions voiced here, I am doubtful. The price is too great in my opinion.
    It's all Here. Now.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman View Post
    And we didn't land a man on the moon, Kennedy was a inside job--so was 9-11, and Cold fusion is real along with the government hiding UFOs. Awesome.



    How can anyone deny we went to the moon?
    Kennedy was a mob hit.
    Someone allowed 9/11 to happen.
    Claims of cold fusion came from scientist at CU Boulder. Need I say more?
    Does a fish in a fishbowl know what a human looking at them from outside is? Would humans know what an alien looking at them from the sky looked like if they saw one? Is it really the moon? What does an alien look like? How do you know?

    Is it just a map? Or a story waiting to be told?

    No.. I'm only smart enough to know how little we really know.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    I'm only smart enough to know how little we really know.
    Of all the insanity I've seen, read, and watched everywhere, this is about the most SANE thing I've ever read! AND, the fact it came from UT...it's just staggering!

    **j/k UT**

    And, for those of you who simply believe in things claimed/stated by so called "scientists" w/o a bit of fact checking and eval of opposing viewpoints...specifically when "modeling" was used...FYI, "science" is the latest and most recent religion to come to human civilization. If you think "scientists" aren't biased to maintaining their meal ticket by "tweaking" results to sustain their funding, I've got some land in a city called Atlantis I'd like to sell you
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
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    All of that and I bet pulser is still pissed there are oil wells up there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    And, for those of you who simply believe in things claimed/stated by so called "scientists" w/o a bit of fact checking and eval of opposing viewpoints...specifically when "modeling" was used...FYI, "science" is the latest and most recent religion to come to human civilization. If you think "scientists" aren't biased to maintaining their meal ticket by "tweaking" results to sustain their funding, I've got some land in a city called Atlantis I'd like to sell you
    Very true point here, regardless of what side you are on.

    If and alternative energy is developed to replace fuel and it is the same or less expensive than oil, I believe most Americans or probably most of the world be in favor.

    There is also a huge R&D cost to this, maybe companies like GE will help lead the way.
    One long-term issue IMO is producing Scientist and Engineers, or the lack of I should say here in the US. I have a friend that works at MIT. We were talking a few months ago and over 80% of the school is Asian, not sure how many are American citizens. Let me be clear, I have NOTHING again any other culture. My point is this county is not producing enough Scientists and Engineers which could be a huge dilemma down the road to help with the development of non-crude oil based energy.

    And the ones we do develop are going to be swayed by the very high income jobs in the oil and gas industry. Heck, Anadarko’s Denver Christmas party last year was at either the Ritz or the four Seasons and if you wanted to stay the night, you were only charged something like $30(info from a friend who works there). Who wouldn’t want this when you worked your butt off in school.

    As much as I don’t wish it, the “Green Energy” economy, it is going to be a long, slow climb.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyinCO View Post
    One long-term issue IMO is producing Scientist and Engineers, or the lack of I should say here in the US. I have a friend that works at MIT. We were talking a few months ago and over 80% of the school is Asian, not sure how many are American citizens. Let me be clear, I have NOTHING again any other culture. My point is this county is not producing enough Scientists and Engineers which could be a huge dilemma down the road to help with the development of non-crude oil based energy.
    Oh man! So as a final piece of work for my MS, I assembled a report on the Electrical Power industry's workforce demographics gap... In my research, I found the 2011 report Status of Education of G8 Nations. Check out the attached pic!
    In my conclusion I made a point of comparing US to France... France is able to sustain one of the highest levels of science and engineering degrees conferred, doing so with one of the lowest numbers of education degrees conferred...think there maybe something wrong w/ our higher education paradigm?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Oil drilling in Soapstone Natural Area-g8-nation-degrees-conferred.jpg  

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  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    You're like a small child crying and stamping his feet in the playground: "No Fair!" Not fair that everyone else gets cheap energy and we do not. Not fair that China is now doing what the US has done for years and years, and is getting all the pies. Sheesh!

    To the guy talking about negative rep up there, get over it, whatever side of the fence you are on, if you voice your opinion there will be a flurry of anonymous neg-reppers bonking you on the back of the head when you are not looking like kids in the schoolyard. Too cowardly to say anything in public. I reserve utter contempt for them, anonymously of course, and I collect petty insults!

    And then you give up on the debate. I see. When someone, myself included at times, resorts to name calling, they have lost the battle of ideas. You are also like a child. So join the club. You want green policies your way and only your way.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyinCO View Post
    Very true point here, regardless of what side you are on.

    If and alternative energy is developed to replace fuel and it is the same or less expensive than oil, I believe most Americans or probably most of the world be in favor.

    As much as I don’t wish it, the “Green Energy” economy, it is going to be a long, slow climb.
    I agree with much of what you have written. As I've said before, I am confident that I am not alone in saying I am unwilling to sacrifice this countries economic prosperity any longer in order to artificially make "green energy" more economically attractive. With the continued lack of progress in getting the US economy back on track, an increasing number of Americans are also coming to this realization. That doesn't mean I would be against "green" energy when it is economically viable.

    See the problem is the people hell bent on implementing "green" energy at all costs are not open to any other views. They aren't open to moderation. They think it is enough to demonize fossil fuels, but an increasing number of people aren't in favor of continuing to sacrifice our economy. Like the person above, "green" people will call those of us concerned with the economy spoiled. But they are spoiled in that things have to be their way. Meanwhile most Americans would be in favor of replacing fossil fuels were it economically viable without sacrificing our standard of living.

    "Green" people like to say they are for freedom. Freedom from oil. But they are not about freedom because things must be their way. As an example in this thread that "green" person did not want to give the Eskimo's the opportunity to choose whether they wanted to permit drilling on their land in exchange for significant lease income. Actually they are called Inuits not Eskimos. The "green" people are only about freedom their way. That's not freedom.

    I had a friend who lives in New Mexico who does volunteer work with the Native Americans near Santa Fe. You cannot believe the teen suicide and alcoholism the Native Americans are enduring. I don't want to get into a debate about America's past treatment of Native Americans, however, it is possible that economic development could really help Native Americans such as the Inuits in Alaska. But "green" people don't even want to give Inuits in Alaska the chance to decide for themselves. Its the same in Ohio where fracking has made huge new fossil fuel reserves economically viable. This could rescue Ohio's economy and create thousands of jobs. But "green" people don't want to give Ohioians the chance to recover economically. And when we call the "green" people out on this they call us 8th graders or selfish children and then leave the debate?

  93. #93
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    Chirp chrip. Chirp chirp. I guess they gave up after calling us selfish children for wanting to be able to save and invest in a prosperous economy so we can have money to pay for our kids' education and retire.

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