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Thread: Loveland pass

  1. #1
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    Loveland pass

    Hey, how many of you guys ride loveland pass? What kind of gear do you pack? Do you hitch hike back to your car? What about full moon rides? Thanks, Ryan.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To stay balanced, one must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

  2. #2
    Big Boned
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    I ride there occasionally, if conditions are worth it. It often gets windblown though, so it's kind of hit or miss, depending on what you're looking for. I'm pretty picky about powder. It also gets really crowded on weekends.

    Park at the lower switchback on the Loveland side and you won't have to hitch back to your car.

    If you just ride the trees straight from the top to the lower switchback, it's relatively low avy danger because it gets skied quite a bit, and it's in the trees. The real risk is if a big slide comes from above, or if you hike out and ride any of the stuff either on the north or south cirques.

    If you plan to ride there, get avy gear and learn how to use it -- beacon, shovel, probe, pack. Even if you never get caught, you don't want to be stuck holding your diÁk if someone else needs your help. Personally, I won't pick up anyone hitching unless I see they're carrying at least a shovel.
    Never rub another man's rhubarb.

  3. #3
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    Used to ride there a lot. Weekends are PACKED, especially if its snowing (like everywhere, I guess). Probably cuz you can hitch 100% and have to hike 0%. I'll still take my dogs there on a weekday so they can get a few days in with me, but there are much better lines in the state...they require hiking though.

    I've done some moonlight rides, kinna cool to be out in nature at night- just bring your gun...cuz, ya know

    And like MMD says it gets windblown easy up top, so best lines are in the trees. And that far west cirque just irks the sh!t out of me. I saw the whole depth down to the ground slide one year, after I had ridden it several times. Haven't hit it since.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  4. #4
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    Cool thanks, I want to ride some lines likes that, sounds fun. I don't mind a hike. For some sweet pow. So whats some other good backcountry rides around my parts, that are "safe" or a lot of people ride. Thanks, Ryan.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To stay balanced, one must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

  5. #5
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    [backcountry rant]

    Do not go anywhere outside of the resorts unless you know what you are doing and are properly equipped. That means carrying the equipment and knowledge you and your partner will need to have a safe adventure - beacon, shovel, probe and training on how to use them properly. Venturing out of the safety (usually) of the resorts and into the backcountry, whether it be Loveland Pass or anywhere else, requires a heightened level of awareness for the risk of avalanche danger. Just because everyone else is doing does not make is safe. Having knowledge is more than how to use a beacon to find someone. It is really how not to have to use a beacon to find someone as in avoiding situations of danger.

    Current avalanche conditions are CONSIDERABLE for anywhere in the Summit County and surrounding areas.


    If you venture out of the resort without the proper knowledge there is a good chance you or someone you know will die.

    [/end rant]
    Tact is for people not witty enough to be sarcastic...

  6. #6
    zrm
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    Used to ski Loveland pass a lot in the 80s. Every now and then we'd run into some grey haired folks who had been skiing there since the 40s which was kind of cool.

    Way too much of a zoo for me these days though. Too many people doing stupid s**t above me that I have no control over. It's so busy these days that some area literally get bumped out. Lot's of huckers and jibbers building jumps and setting up rails if that's your cup of tea. Not to mention, several years ago I gave a couple guys a ride in the back of my truck and they pilfered my toolbox of a couple Snap On ratchets, i didnt realize it till after I got home. Kind of soured me to the whole Loveland pass scene.

    There is some nice terrain that doesn't get as much use if you're willing to skin for it, but as has been mentioned, you'd better be avy savy. Loveland pass is a place that most of the forecasters at the CAIC feel could be the next big multi fatality. They did a survey a couple years ago at the summit of users and found something like 30% carried standard rescue gear. Not good.

    Sorry if that sounds negative, It's my opinion and I know lots of people think Loveland is great and have a lot of fun there and that's fine, but for me, it's not much of a backcountry experience. What you're looking for may be totally different. Whatever you do, enjoy and be safe!

  7. #7
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by kchri
    [backcountry rant]

    Do not go anywhere outside of the resorts unless you know what you are doing and are properly equipped. That means carrying the equipment and knowledge you and your partner will need to have a safe adventure - beacon, shovel, probe and training on how to use them properly. Venturing out of the safety (usually) of the resorts and into the backcountry, whether it be Loveland Pass or anywhere else, requires a heightened level of awareness for the risk of avalanche danger. Just because everyone else is doing does not make is safe. Having knowledge is more than how to use a beacon to find someone. It is really how not to have to use a beacon to find someone as in avoiding situations of danger.

    Current avalanche conditions are CONSIDERABLE for anywhere in the Summit County and surrounding areas.


    If you venture out of the resort without the proper knowledge there is a good chance you or someone you know will die.

    [/end rant]


    Loveland Pass is not "safe" just because tons of people ride it. There was a guy on the news a few days back that said he felt safe because CDOT "controlled" the Pass. Guess what - they only control what is likely to cover the road in the case of an avy. Which ain't much on the Pass.

  8. #8
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    Pfffft whatever
    Search and rescue (recovery) peeps need jobs, too.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    Pfffft whatever
    Search and rescue (recovery) peeps need jobs, too.
    WHAT?!?!?

    They get PAID to do that??




  10. #10
    nice marmot.
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    These guys are right on, if you don't have avy equipment and training you are taking a serious risk. You aren't risking getting hurt, you are risking DEATH. Just because other people ride there it doesn't make it safe....

  11. #11
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    Hey thanks for the info. So like I asked what kind of gear do you guys pack. I know I need atleast a shovel, probe, gps and avy beacon. Which have you tired and liked and tired and didn't like. Thanks, Ryan.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To stay balanced, one must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

  12. #12
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    what people are trying to say.....

    What people are trying to say is that its not enough to just carry avy gear. We need to know a bit about how to watch the weather to get a feel for the layers of snow over time and how to assess avy danger.

    This is a good book to begin the process.

    http://www.amazon.com/Avalanche-Hand.../dp/0898863643

    What we really need is avalanche training. Level 1 and 2 are most applicable. Such as this course.

    http://boc123.com/snow/avalanche_certification.cfm

    The basics would include an avi beacon, shovel, and probe. Newer beacons with directional arrows seem easier to use then the old school ones which used tones. You need a very sturdy shovel. When avalanche debris finally comes to a stop, the snow sets up extremely hard. You need a metal shovel to deal with that hard snow. An avalanche probe is a good idea. Though if you are using a probe, we are likely talking about a body recovery, not a rescue.

    You need to know about weather and snow layers to assess danger. Dig a pit and assess layers of snow. Avalanche trainers from the Colorado avalanche information center say that people who have had just a bit of avi training, but are not very experienced, put themselves in even more danger then untrained people in many cases. This is due to people assuming they understand more then they truly do while an untrained person may be more conservative.

    I'm not trying to discourage anyone, quite the contrary. We just need to educate ourselves. Carrying the right gear is a start, but there is much more to handling avi danger.

    Here are current conditions.
    http://avalanche.state.co.us/

    Marc

  13. #13
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    Gps?

    I forgot to add. I'm not sure what value GPS will add to the avalanche preparedness equation. If you are hiking way out into the backcountry, perhaps a GPS could be useful in route finding. However, in a situation where a member of our party is actually caught in an avalanche, a GPS would not add any value to the situation. We would want, instead, to be watching for the last place we see the victim in order to narrow our search area for the buried party member once the avalanche stops. Avalanche mitigation protocol says that only one member of the party descends at a time while the rest of the party watches that skier very closely in case of avi problems. The last thing we want to be doing at the time is studying a GPS device.

    Marc

  14. #14
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    Thanks for the info. Ryan.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To stay balanced, one must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

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    Having come VERY close to drowning in a tree well last week, I think it's very important to mention other dangers of snow.
    Ride with a smart partner and keep a close eye on each other. Have a plan if you get lost or stuck.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  16. #16
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    these guys

    went out with knowledge and someone still died.

    a video
    http://www.denverpost.com/ci_8306484

    story
    http://www.denverpost.com/ci_8309475

  17. #17
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    I've had some of the best in bounds runs I can remember this season.

    Asspen 014.jpg
    Last edited by WKD-RDR; 02-20-2008 at 09:44 AM. Reason: added photo to show off...
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    Having come VERY close to drowning in a tree well last week, I think it's very important to mention other dangers of snow.
    Ride with a smart partner and keep a close eye on each other. Have a plan if you get lost or stuck.
    That and stay the hell away from big tree wells.

  19. #19
    skillz to pay billz
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    that's a fact

    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    I've had some of the best in bounds runs I can remember this season.

    Asspen 014.jpg

  20. #20
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    I got surprised by an unexpected powder day at Steamboat on Sunday. 4" was the official report, but it was knee-deep in all the out-of-the-way places and some of the "public" places. I think I did 7 knee deep runs by 11:00 and called it a day.

  21. #21
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    I've had some of the best in bounds runs I can remember this season.

    Asspen 014.jpg
    Deep Temerity? Or the G-Zones perhaps?

    Here's a little "secret" Winter Park goodness:




  22. #22
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    Boat Pow!

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    I got surprised by an unexpected powder day at Steamboat on Sunday. 4" was the official report, but it was knee-deep in all the out-of-the-way places and some of the "public" places. I think I did 7 knee deep runs by 11:00 and called it a day.
    DUDE!
    I was there Sunday, rippin pow ALL DAM DAY. Its like the yocals stay away cuz of the gapers, and the gapers stay on groomers. = Trees for me. My stash runs were mainly untracked even at 3 PM.
    Yeah 4" my arse, more like a foot up top. At least they dont fluff thier numbers, like um Breck....
    Called it a day by 11AM, man you crazy!
    I love the Boat!
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    Deep Temerity? Or the G-Zones perhaps?
    NOPE

    [SIZE="1"]highlands[/SIZE]
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    NOPE

    [SIZE="1"]highlands[/SIZE]
    Ummm.... Deep Temerity and the G-Zones ARE at the Highlands.

  25. #25
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR
    DUDE!
    I was there Sunday, rippin pow ALL DAM DAY. Its like the yocals stay away cuz of the gapers, and the gapers stay on groomers. = Trees for me. My stash runs were mainly untracked even at 3 PM.
    Yeah 4" my arse, more like a foot up top. At least they dont fluff thier numbers, like um Breck....
    Called it a day by 11AM, man you crazy!
    I love the Boat!
    Monday I was rippin' fresh pow with my 6 & 5 year olds. Amazing what people will leave untracked in plain sight.

    Sunday was KILLER good considering the snow report. I only threw in the towel at 11:00 because my wife was going out at noon to rip bumps all afternoon.

    I'll bet you $9 I saw you in the trees.

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