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  1. #1
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    Leadville 100 Training

    I have been trying to pry out some information from anyone on training for Leadville. I am a first timer and I am trying to put together a training calendar.

    It is almost like the training plan for Leadville is an ENIGMA or a secret?

    Should I focus on building up mileage or the # of hours on the bike?

    I know there is probably not an all inclusive training plan for everyone, but just looking for a shell to get me started.

    I already do a lot of cross-training (running, strength training, incline etc.), but need to know how long and where I should be riding around Colorado Springs in the next 6 months.

    Thanks in advance for any input!!!!!

    Sheffie

  2. #2
    holding back the darkness
    Reputation: subliminalshiver's Avatar
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    Don't over-think it too much. Go ride your bike.
    Ride a whole bunch. By the time july rolls around work your way up to 50-60mile rides once or twice a week. Head over to Leadville and ride hagerman pass and powerline and columbine a couple times so you know what to expect.
    That's it.
    The big enigma is that it doesn't require crazy planning or regimented training. Just go ride. Go ride a lot. Have fun. If you're still having fun by the time Leadville rolls around you'll be in good shape.

  3. #3
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    Thanks

    subliminalshiver,

    I sincerly appreciate your feedback and advice. That is really what I was looking for, as you can tell I am not that experienced at MTB endurance training and I am fairly new to the MTB scene.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    simple
    Reputation: 69erSycip's Avatar
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    You don't even need to be on a MTB to train for the Leadville 100 properly. Go out on long distance road bike rides, especially at altitude with sustained climbing, and you will develop the base that you need for that race.

  5. #5
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
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    Yup. As everyone else said - ride a lot.

  6. #6
    !Vamos, flaco!
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    Hooking up with Cheryl Crow has arguably helped a previous winner. Try that.
    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pabs
    Hooking up with Cheryl Crow has arguably helped a previous winner. Try that.
    only if you dump her also.
    I just got food poisoning. I'm not sure when I'll use it - Steven Wright

  8. #8
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    Hey Sheffie,

    Big thread with some great training info is over in the 'Endurance Racing' Forum. Good luck, we'll see you there!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69erSycip
    You don't even need to be on a MTB to train for the Leadville 100 properly. Go out on long distance road bike rides, especially at altitude with sustained climbing, and you will develop the base that you need for that race.
    Although I generally agree that riding a road bike (including climbing) is great training and helps build your base, I will add that hours in the saddle of the bike you intend to ride is equally as important.

    Riding a road bike on relatively long rides with lots of climbing is different than riding that same ride on your mountain bike. Your body position, saddle height, actual saddle or whether you where a camelbak etc. are different.

    Go ride, have fun, build up to long miles/time in the saddle and work on your nutrition. You'll find that nutrition that works for a 4 hour ride can be COMPLETELY different than 9-12 hour rides. You need to remember to continue to eat on long rides (before its too late). I've found this to be my biggest challenge going from 4-6 hr rides to the 7+ hr rides. I think on the shorter rides I just go chow down after the ride, but if you have to ride for 4 more hours and are not eating, the bonk will set in.

    I'm no expert, I've completed Leadville twice - just my .02 cents.

    There's also a yahoo group that has a bunch of info on Leadville 100 - note there's been a bit of whining lately due to people not getting in and paying $15 etc. but there is a lot of info there and you can search old posts for training tips too.

    http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/LT100Bike/ EDIT - I updated the link

    Good luck - go get that buckle (and have fun)!
    Last edited by ds2199; 02-18-2010 at 08:38 PM.

  10. #10
    rubber side down
    Reputation: russman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pabs
    Hooking up with Cheryl Crow has arguably helped a previous winner. Try that.
    Don't forget getting one of your balls removed. Saves on weight.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by russman
    Don't forget getting one of your balls removed. Saves on weight.
    lop both of them off and you will definitely win it all.

  12. #12
    Obviously Single
    Reputation: LeeMan's Avatar
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    Try the veterans of the LT100

    Quote Originally Posted by Sheffie
    I have been trying to pry out some information from anyone on training for Leadville. I am a first timer and I am trying to put together a training calendar.

    It is almost like the training plan for Leadville is an ENIGMA or a secret?

    Should I focus on building up mileage or the # of hours on the bike?

    I know there is probably not an all inclusive training plan for everyone, but just looking for a shell to get me started.

    I already do a lot of cross-training (running, strength training, incline etc.), but need to know how long and where I should be riding around Colorado Springs in the next 6 months.

    Thanks in advance for any input!!!!!

    Sheffie
    Check out the Yahoo mailing list that many of the LT100 veterans use: http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/LT100Bike/

    I won't even try to answer your question since it's so open ended. Just make sure you do lots of long rides (work up to 6+ hours), perhaps once a week.

    And congrats on getting in (since so many did not).
    The Lee-Man

    A witty saying proves nothing. -- Voltaire

  13. #13
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    the Yahoo Group

    Quote Originally Posted by ds2199

    There's also a yahoo group that has a bunch of info on Leadville 100 - note there's been a bit of whining lately due to people not getting in and paying $15 etc. but there is a lot of info there and you can search old posts for training tips too.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/leadville/

    Good luck - go get that buckle (and have fun)!
    As DS mentions - just skip over all of the recent whining and crying over this year (including some form me!). Do a search for posts by justartok over the past few years. I found them to be very helpful my first time (2005).

    And, the Endurance Racing forum is also good!

  14. #14
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    wrong URL

    Quote Originally Posted by ds2199
    Although I generally agree that riding a road bike (including climbing) is great training and helps build your base, I will add that hours in the saddle of the bike you intend to ride is equally as important.

    ...

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/leadville/

    Good luck - go get that buckle (and have fun)!
    That URL is for the group that represents the town of Leadville. You won't get much help there.
    The Lee-Man

    A witty saying proves nothing. -- Voltaire

  15. #15
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    I'm no expert but I have done the LT100 4 times, and 3 times around 9 hours. For training try and climb as much as you can. Both on the road and dirt, and get used to tough climbs after hours into a ride. The Powerline climb is what crushes people. Also ride at altitude.

    My favorite training rides were White Ranch over Gap road to Golden Gate and then loop Mountain Loin or more. In the summer climb Argentine Pass and/or McCellan Pass from Georgetown. That is a great 6-8K of climbing with some hike-a-bike and 13Kft altitude.

    I always figure if I can ride 2/3 of the race distance/time in training I should be capable of finishing the race.

    Good luck.

  16. #16
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    try this one

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeMan
    That URL is for the group that represents the town of Leadville. You won't get much help there.
    http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...guid=206159359

  17. #17
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    Do lots of hard road climbs. Flagstaff, Lookout, Lefthand, Cottonwood Pass, etc. Use your mountain bike if you don't have a road bike, or even if you do.

    Do some kind of racing. Even the Boulder Wednesday night short track is good, but something with longer climbs would be better. The Silver Rush is a great simulation.

    HIKE! A lot of first timers don't realize that unless you are going under 9 hours (in which case you wouldn't be asking training questions here), you WILL walk at least 30 minutes of the course, and everyone except Lance walks some parts, even Dave. Try to do some rides where you have to get off and push up steep hills. This will tell you if you need to work on stretching your calves and hamstrings, or you are OK with it. I've seen people debilitated by cramps when they get off to push up Columbine, on the steep hill on the return (you don't have to deal with the "North Face" push anymore), and on the Powerline. Also, it will tell you if your shoes only suck a little for pushing, or if they suck a lot. Hiking a 14'er or two is really good training, too, and I highly recommend it.

    This isn't really training, but nail down all your bike stuff at least a month ahead of the race to be sure it is *really* sorted out. This means everything: saddle, tires, wheels, suspension settings, grips. Do all your rides the last month carrying exactly what you will carry during the race, including a jacket, food, and water. Get used to the tires you will be using, especially how they respond on hardpack. Wear the exact clothing you will wear for the race on at least a couple of 4+ hour rides. Those gloves or shorts that are fine for three hours might really suck after eight. Do NOT, and I mean do NOT change your bike the last few weeks before the race. For example, one year I decided at the last minute to use a lighter front wheel that was radially spoked. I had put maybe 200 miles on the wheel, so I thought it was good. The spokes loosened completely about 70 miles in, and I had to spend 15 minutes working on the wheel just to get to the pipeline aid station, where I luckily had a spare. Remember that the race is 100 miles. If you routinely have to tighten or adjust anything on your bike every 100 miles or so, it ain't going to cut it for a 100 mile race. Common sense, but easy to overlook. Oh yeah, TIGHTEN YOUR CLEATS.

    Have fun. It really is a great race..

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