Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4,549

    Katie Compton bee sting

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/comp...d-by-bee-sting

    Wow, she's lucky someone in the crowd had an epi pen. If not, it could have been bad depending on the severity of her allergy. It can take a while for the medics to get there.

    Anyone else out there have a bee sting allergy and carry an epi pen?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MtbRN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    893
    Quote Originally Posted by zrm
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/comp...d-by-bee-sting

    Wow, she's lucky someone in the crowd had an epi pen. If not, it could have been bad depending on the severity of her allergy. It can take a while for the medics to get there.

    Anyone else out there have a bee sting allergy and carry an epi pen?
    Yep, and thanks for the reminder. Time to put the epi back in the camelback, now that it's bee season again.
    I drank the 29er koolaid- turns out it was POWERade

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Pau11y's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,621
    Quote Originally Posted by MtbRN
    Yep, and thanks for the reminder. Time to put the epi back in the camelback, now that it's bee season again.
    Hey MtbRN,
    Assuming your nick suggests some med background, I've got a question for you: trail first aid stuff.
    I carry TP (for non-first aid reasons as well), tape (either cloth or duct tape), and a small thingie of super glue. Everything that's in my little list serves dual duty. What else (besides an epi pen in your case) do you think would be advisable for quick trail (people) fixes? Any other inputs welcomed.
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
    ╭∩╮( . )╭∩╮

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    49
    Two safety pins. Fractured clavical. Use the two pins to hold their arm in their jersey.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    23
    I carry epi pen and also some chewable Benadryl. If taken right away after a bee sting, it is usually enough.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    35
    I got stung by a bee last year racing. I'm not allergic but it really sucked and slowed me down a bunch.

  7. #7
    Now with 20% more fat!!
    Reputation: JSD303's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,026
    On super long or back country rides, I carry a ton of stuff. I carry ibuprofen, aspirin, ace bandages, zip ties, flexible neck/bone brace, antibiotic ointment, benadryl, duct tape, hiker pro water filter / iodine tabs, camelbak cover and paklite goretex jacket... I carry one of those large adventure med kits as well. You almost WANT to crash and get hurt on rides with me...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Pau11y's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,621
    Quote Originally Posted by JSD303
    On super long or back country rides, I carry a ton of stuff. I carry ibuprofen, aspirin, ace bandages, zip ties, flexible neck/bone brace, antibiotic ointment, benadryl, duct tape, hiker pro water filter / iodine tabs, camelbak cover and paklite goretex jacket... I carry one of those large adventure med kits as well. You almost WANT to crash and get hurt on rides with me...
    ...and most importantly, go buy one of these!
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
    ╭∩╮( . )╭∩╮

  9. #9
    pain intolerant
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    675
    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y
    ...and most importantly, go buy one of these!
    Purchased. Good call!

  10. #10
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4,549
    In a ziplock I carry at all times in my camelback:

    A zip lock with some antiseptic towelettes (examine frequently, replace when they dry out)
    2-3 4X4 gauze pads
    A few Knuckle bandages (much more versatile than a standard band aid)
    A women's sanitary pad (great for lots of blood)
    A pair of tweezers
    A small roll of white tape.
    A few packs of 3 in 1 antibacterial ointment
    4-5 iodine prep pads
    A few alcohol wipes
    A couple standard band aids
    Examine gloves
    A lighter
    A little fire starter stick
    A whistle

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    412
    Good lists so far...

    One thing I discovered last fall...Benadryl now comes in a melt away strip like those Listerene strips that stick to the roof of your mouth. Faster then melt away tablets for getting into ones blood stream and come in really thin small packets.

    Cheers,
    Mike

  12. #12
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    916
    Quote Originally Posted by mbcracken
    Good lists so far...

    One thing I discovered last fall...Benadryl now comes in a melt away strip like those Listerene strips that stick to the roof of your mouth. Faster then melt away tablets for getting into ones blood stream and come in really thin small packets.

    Cheers,
    Mike
    Cool, thanks for posting this! I'm going to get some!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,191

    That freaked me out

    I swell up big when I get stung by a bee which I understand is fairly normal. My last two stings have been to the face, one on the nose (It was hard to believe it could get any bigger) and the next in the lip while riding.
    Do/can people progress from that normal reaction to the full anaphylaxis? If so I'll carry an epipen too.
    2 wheels

  14. #14
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    916
    Quote Originally Posted by artnshel
    Do/can people progress from that normal reaction to the full anaphylaxis? If so I'll carry an epipen too.
    Yes. But talk to your doctor before getting an Epipen!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,191

    Isn't that the only way to get one?

    Quote Originally Posted by TobyGadd
    Yes. But talk to your doctor before getting an Epipen!
    I will.
    2 wheels

  16. #16
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4,549
    Quote Originally Posted by TobyGadd
    Yes. But talk to your doctor before getting an Epipen!
    I'm pretty sure epipens are a prescription item.

  17. #17
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    10,556
    I carry a flask.

  18. #18
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y
    ...and most importantly, go buy one of these!
    This reminds me....

    Just to clear up up some myths (or misunderstandings) of the COSAR cards---just in case people are wondering.

    --They don't cover anything really--for you at least. All they allow is the rescue people to recover costs incurred getting you out. Rocky Mountain rescue will help you regardless and not charge you. The COSAR sets up a fund that the rescue agencies can tap into if you show it. At the end of the year, all agencies can recover leftover funds, if available, to recoup costs whether you had a card or not.

    --If you have to get ambulance, you better have health insurance. They will charge you. This includes a helicopter. Don't think that if you have a COSAR card, you can get a free helicopter ride out of the woods. Helicopters are ambulances.

    --If you take narcotics (e.g. morphine) from an injury during rescue, You have to take ambulance--or copter out....unless you have somehow arranged another party (family) take you. But once you take the drugs, you are likely at the whim of the rescue people.

    A COSAR card is a nice thing to do for the rescue people, but don't think it's a "get out of jail--I mean danger-- card."

    The best thing you can really do is be responsible. Don't go in the mountains totally unprepared. That saves everyone pains.

    And yes, get a COSAR card to help those rescue people out when they are helping the unprepared idiots.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gotdirt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3,302
    Quote Originally Posted by JSD303
    On super long or back country rides, I carry a ton of stuff. I carry ibuprofen, aspirin, ace bandages, zip ties, flexible neck/bone brace, antibiotic ointment, benadryl, duct tape, hiker pro water filter / iodine tabs, camelbak cover and paklite goretex jacket... I carry one of those large adventure med kits as well. You almost WANT to crash and get hurt on rides with me...
    note to self: ride w/ john this year (and go light!).
    -
    .And following our will and wind . . .
    . . .We'll ride the spiral to the end
    and may just go where no one's been.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •