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  1. #1
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    I hit my noggin many times while mountain biking....I think?


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    I'm glad I'm old now, don't go fast enough to hurt myself.

  3. #3
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    I suffered my third concussion this summer...this TBI is going to last about a year before I see major improvements. No long term damage supposedly.

  4. #4
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    Re: I hit my noggin many times while mountain biking....I think?

    My worst fear frankly.

  5. #5
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    Just the price of being a totally core badass brah.

  6. #6
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    I've broken 3 helmets in 24 years of mountain biking. I don't think I got a concussion in any of them, but I always thought to myself that I'm glad I'm wearing a lid as I was breaking it.

    I think my head was rocked more this year when I switched from FS and rode a hardtail all year. That f'n hurt my brain a bit after 2 hours into the ride. I began to wonder if all that bouncing was good from my brain. It's rocky out here, kudos to all you guys who can ride hardtails for 3 hours +. I just ordered up FS for next year.
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust in garage

  7. #7
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    I hit my noggin many times while mountain biking....I think?

    That's a chilling article.

    I have to agree that with modern bikes we tend to ride harder than before. My Tallboy LTc is a phenomenal terrain eater and I can rider faster and harder than ever before. But in the last year I have crashed more times than in the prior seven years on my prior (mid 90s XC) bike.

    Luckily for me I tend to crash at slow to moderate speeds. It's when I'm not 100% focused is when I lose it. I don't remember a crash occurring while ripping it full bore. Perhaps because I knocked myself out .

    Seriously though, the closest to that was on Spingbrook about a year or so ago. That was my biggest recent crash. Wiped out at about 20mph. Slammed my body into a rock and cut up my leg, chest, shoulder and chin. Also punctured, but did not break, my helmet in that one. From the hole in the helmet I'm glad I was wearing it.

    Ride safe !

  8. #8
    old skool newbie
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    ok let's roll

    If you remember this clip you survived many a ride as a kid without a helmet.


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheNormsk View Post
    That's a chilling article.

    I have to agree that with modern bikes we tend to ride harder than before. My Tallboy LTc is a phenomenal terrain eater and I can rider faster and harder than ever before. But in the last year I have crashed more times than in the prior seven years on my prior (mid 90s XC) bike.

    Luckily for me I tend to crash at slow to moderate speeds. It's when I'm not 100% focused is when I lose it. I don't remember a crash occurring while ripping it full bore. Perhaps because I knocked myself out .

    Seriously though, the closest to that was on Spingbrook about a year or so ago. That was my biggest recent crash. Wiped out at about 20mph. Slammed my body into a rock and cut up my leg, chest, shoulder and chin. Also punctured, but did not break, my helmet in that one. From the hole in the helmet I'm glad I was wearing it.

    Ride safe !
    Agreed! In 20 years of riding I have broken exactly one helmet, but in the last three years I have been to the ER twice for stitches, once for a cracked rib and this last one was the kicker. I crashed on the Porcupine Rim Singletrack and slammed my cheek into a rock fracturing it in three places and TBI to boot. A full face would have helped but who rides the whole enchilada in a full face? Not a scratch on my helmet. I am 9 weeks in to a recovery but the effects of TBI will be with me for a while.

    As you said my AM bike has expanded the bounds of what I did on my XC/trail bike a few years ago. Maybe its time to slow down? I only went to the ER once in the previous 16 years of riding. I will dial it back a bit from now on since TBI is a bigger deal than I have given it credit before. I skateboarded as a kid without a helmet and survived a couple of concussions. This one at age 40 is a much bigger deal.

    I hit my noggin many times while mountain biking....I think?-p4pb10275418.jpg
    I hit my noggin many times while mountain biking....I think?-p4pb10275417.jpg
    Narrow is the path to life, few are those who find it.

  10. #10
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    There should be a tread dedicated to xrays from the Moab ER.

    They used to have a map on the wall with pins in it where various incident occurred. Don't know if that made it to the new place.
    Since when did Need have anything to do with this?

  11. #11
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    I am not sure we can blame it on the newer bikes and higher speeds, you still have to calculate what you can and can not do. It should be a progression and not just jumping straight into the deep end. Heal up fast Wilsonblur..

    I ride faster and doing more every year at 44, going to Whistler yearly but.. I stay on the bike lots and don't feel like I take big chances, but continually progress slowly.

    I have had a couple bike related concussions, but they were back in the 90's when I was learning (and a bike broke under me). I do crash here and there, but usually know how to fall these days.
    BBZ

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by billybobzia View Post
    I am not sure we can blame it on the newer bikes and higher speeds, you still have to calculate what you can and can not do. It should be a progression and not just jumping straight into the deep end. Heal up fast Wilsonblur..

    I ride faster and doing more every year at 44, going to Whistler yearly but.. I stay on the bike lots and don't feel like I take big chances, but continually progress slowly.

    I have had a couple bike related concussions, but they were back in the 90's when I was learning (and a bike broke under me). I do crash here and there, but usually know how to fall these days.
    Thanks for the well wishes. I don't think anyone was blaming it on the bikes exactly. Its taking higher risks with the style of riding that comes with the AM bike. I am a better rider now at 40 than I was before but I am riding lines that have much greater consequences than before. I ride in my limits pretty well but little mistakes are costly. You are correct in pointing us to riding in our abilities. I generally work up in progression as you said. We all know that guy who rides out of his ability. Correct gear also helps, pads would have prevented both sets of stitches. This crash in Moab had nothing to do with limits but rather due to changing trail conditions. There's a blind drop that I have hit every year that the transitioned landing had washed out leaving about 18" of landing space and another 24" drop. I bailed at the top landed horizontally face hitting a 24" rock. Not a scratch anywhere else. I think even if we work hard at progressing up we are still vulnerable to greater injury than just trail riding.
    Narrow is the path to life, few are those who find it.

  13. #13
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    I burned in at Centennial Cone on Labor Day. Was heading clockwise from the rock cropping/outlook towards the bridge. I was chasing down my buddy in front of me (he had blazed out of sight) and had another friend following behind me a bit. I awoke to find myself trying to pull myself to my feet and back onto the trail but remember not being able to stand up. My friend pulling up the rear found me lying unconscious in the middle of the trail. He was able to get me back awake and being the “stubborn old guy” that I am, I wanted to ride ahead to catch the lead rider and try to ride it out back to the Mayhem Gulch trail head. On the way up the switchbacks from the bridge I was having a lot of pain in my side and had to stop to try to catch my breath. I guess I passed out as I woke up to my friends standing over top of me telling me that help was on the way. The fire department had to help me out to the dirt road by the homestead where an ambulance was waiting for me. Ended up breaking two ribs, puncturing a lung, and a concussion. Stayed overnight in the hospital and went back to work two days after the accident. I did not realize how hard I had hit my head until trying to perform at work. Very hard as short term memory was a problem for awhile. Also my balance was a bit of a problem specially when riding in the dark. Looking ahead at the lit up trail, then glancing off trail into the darkness then back ahead to the lit up trail would leave me dizzy for a few seconds. Everything seems to have gotten back to normal over the months since the wreck. I still do not have any idea what happened that day but I do know that I hope I don’t hit my head like that again! Getting ready to turn 50 in about a month and it has made me turn the throttle back a bit.

    ***

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by scar View Post
    . Also my balance was a bit of a problem specially when riding in the dark. Looking ahead at the lit up trail, then glancing off trail into the darkness then back ahead to the lit up trail would leave me dizzy for a few seconds. Everything seems to have gotten back to normal over the months since the wreck. I still do not have any idea what happened that day but I do know that I hope I don’t hit my head like that again! Getting ready to turn 50 in about a month and it has made me turn the throttle back a bit.

    ***
    This is the part of TBI that is challenging. Glad you are improving. I still get dizzy easily. I did a night ride with my buddy's at GM and I looked like I was a five year old who just learned to ride. I couldn't ride straight and my balance was so off. The symptoms hang around for a while. I still get nauseous, dizzy, short term memory problems and have trouble focusing. It sure takes a while to recover from this stuff.
    Narrow is the path to life, few are those who find it.

  15. #15
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    I had two concussions when I was a little kid ~ 4 years old. Then nothing until a few years back when I had my worst crash ever.. and I wasn't wearing a helmet. I was knocked out for a good 2-4 mins (landed on my head when I messed up a jump). Initially I couldn't remember anything that had happened in the last six months. It felt like I was waking up from a coma.

    My face was so swollen that the ER did not notice that my nose was broken. That was expensive to get fixed after the fact.

    I got back on the bike about a month later and I didn't notice any ill effects with balance etc. In fact, there was no pain with the injury at all.

    About a year ago, I hit a tree head on riding the moto. It was low speed, but the bike (250lb) rammed me into that tree pretty good. I didn't pass out, but I was pretty freaked at the time since I was alone and there was not much light left.

    I want to live a full life and enjoy myself and I accept the risks. Bad things can happen even when you're sitting on the couch.

    I was at the Brown Burro cafe (Fairplay) earlier this year and I saw a large board fall from the ceiling and hit an old lady right on the head.

    We're here for a good time, not a long time.
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  16. #16
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    Craig hospital is full of people just out having a good time.

  17. #17
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    ...and the morgue is full of people who were just driving along.
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by element1 View Post
    I suffered my third concussion this summer...this TBI is going to last about a year before I see major improvements. No long term damage supposedly.
    According to whom? The problem with long-term damage assessment regarding multiple concussions, is until recently this took an autopsy to determine (tau protein deposition). Unless you've had the PET scan (latest thing), there's just no way to know. Personally, my Parkinsonism (hardly my first long-term symptom, that would be the 15 years of cluster headaches) didn't start until August 2012, over a decade after my 8th (or possibly 9th or 10th) concussion, don't mean to scare anyone other than be sure to always ride with a helmet.

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Scientists Find Way To Trace Concussion-Related Tau Proteins In Former NFL Players

    I've been having excellent results from l-dopa, for my myriad symptoms, but this treatment has yet to get much press. It's been a lifesaver for me, a year ago the last thing I could've done was get a puppy and get back on the bike, as I was just trying to make it from one day to the next without killing myself from the extreme pain in my legs (nothing wrong with my legs, "it's all in my head").

    Anyways, sometimes I don't make much sense for a guy who got 1440 on his SATs and (once upon a time anyway) an IQ over 120, tried reading The Hobbit earlier today but got bogged down on page 83 for like, two hours. I guess my message for some of y'all is, try to learn how to have fun without the adrenaline buzz. Today's athletic gear allows folks to easily exceed their skill level, this is one reason I've stuck with my full-rigid bike (purchased from Full Cycle before Kaj's time), a little rattling and bouncing is nothing compared to the big boppers.
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  19. #19
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    Sorry for your problems. I had a pretty bad concussion from a grenade when I was in the service many, many years ago. So far I have only had some mild short term memory problems. It is difficult to get young people to understand the consequences of seemingly minor injuries, especially concussions, as you age. The kids doing the slopestyle, redbull competitions, etc, will undoubtedly suffer as they grow into their middle and later ages. No one could have talked me out of joining the service when I was 18, because I was invincible.

  20. #20
    Keep on Rockin...
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    Smashed 3 helmets in bad wrecks over the years and I know they work. Also did high contact sports from 12 years old into my 30s.

    For every one sports related traumatic head injury I see, I manage hundreds of other people dying from obesity and sedentary lifestyle related disease.


    Wear your helmet, keep moving, and quit worrying.

  21. #21
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    I think you just made my point for me. Quit worrying.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    For every one sports related traumatic head injury I see, I manage hundreds of other people dying from obesity and sedentary lifestyle related disease.


    Wear your helmet, keep moving, and quit worrying.
    Well said. My Dad said this about helmets "Got a $100 head? Buy a $100 helmet. Got a $500 head? Buy a $500 helmet." That was in the 1990s and he was referring to buying Arai motorcycle helmets but you get the idea.

    I've busted several helmets, never blacked out once.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

  23. #23
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    Don't crash.

    Oh - and don't go "chasing down my buddy"... that's a bad idea. Especially if "my buddy" is IndecentExposure or FullTrucker. Just don't do it.

    That's all I got.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Wear your helmet, keep moving, and quit worrying.
    this


    Quote Originally Posted by wilsonblur View Post
    I crashed on the Porcupine Rim Singletrack and slammed my cheek into a rock fracturing it in three places and TBI to boot. A full face would have helped but who rides the whole enchilada in a full face?
    bah, the face is a helluva crumple zone.

    I'll just add that wearing your helmet low and tight may help in certain situations. Get a helmet that has better coverage (i.e. POC) and gives you better angles of coverage.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  25. #25
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    You people really think that flimsy little bike helmet is going to keep your head safe, then go ahead and keep crashing into rocks at high speed. Check back with me when you are 60 and let me know how its going, if you can still remember who you are and where you are at. Go back and read the articles that lidarman referenced, might be worth your time. And really not sure what head injuries and a sedentary lifestyle or obesity have in common with each other. Oh well, quit worrying, it's just a head.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by WKD-RDR View Post
    this




    bah, the face is a helluva crumple zone.

    I'll just add that wearing your helmet low and tight may help in certain situations. Get a helmet that has better coverage (i.e. POC) and gives you better angles of coverage.
    True, I was wearing a 661 Recon which has good coverage when I crashed and I do a good job of keeping my helmet fitting snuggly to my head and low on my forehead. I bought a POC Trabec and Urge Enduromatic. Where my face hit neither of those helmets would have prevented my injury unfortunately. Only a full face helmet would have.
    Narrow is the path to life, few are those who find it.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokefork View Post
    You people really think that flimsy little bike helmet is going to keep your head safe, then go ahead and keep crashing into rocks at high speed. Check back with me when you are 60 and let me know how its going, if you can still remember who you are and where you are at. Go back and read the articles that lidarman referenced, might be worth your time. And really not sure what head injuries and a sedentary lifestyle or obesity have in common with each other. Oh well, quit worrying, it's just a head.
    I am not sure there's a formula that keeps your head safe. Sure riding fast can increase your risk but hitting your head on a rock at 5mph can be as dangerous as 15mph. Crashes happen to all of us. Riding in your ability is important even then it doesn't take much to hit your head. MTB'ing is a risky sport. Once anyone gets on a bike and trail they are at some level of risk.
    Narrow is the path to life, few are those who find it.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokefork View Post
    You people really think that flimsy little bike helmet is going to keep your head safe, then go ahead and keep crashing into rocks at high speed. Check back with me when you are 60 and let me know how its going, if you can still remember who you are and where you are at. Go back and read the articles that lidarman referenced, might be worth your time. And really not sure what head injuries and a sedentary lifestyle or obesity have in common with each other. Oh well, quit worrying, it's just a head.
    It's worth worrying about for sure. My IQ was seriously reduced by a combination of two key head injuries and lots and lots and lots of substance abuse 'back in the day'. (we should have a whole thread about how weak it is to say 'back in the day').

    Here's the point I'll throw in:

    There's lots that can be bad when you hit your head. There's stuff like eyeballs that pop like a water balloon for example. There's obviously closed head injury. There's skull fracture so bad that you get a brain peak-a-boo...

    Concussions are just your brain slapping around in there and getting a bruise. You can be wearing a $600 Shoei full-face moto helmet, but if you rag-dolly down hard enough that brain is going to slap. You could be on the olympic drooling team even wearing the best available head bucket if you're going fast enough and fall the right way.

    On the left side of my (bald) head in a very prominent place there is a 3" long ragged scar. In 1996 I crashed at Mt Falcon Park. That's all I can really tell you about the actual crash. I know I was going to be going there, and I have some vague memories of the climb up. I was wearing what was in 1996 a decent helmet. It was a bell, and the modern kind that wasn't just a styrofoam beer cooler. But back then you pretty much just had a chin strap. Even if the straps were adjusted perfectly, the hat could move. Mine clearly flopped out of the way when I went down allowing the side of my skull to smash down and scrape open. I'm quite confident that even if I'd been wearing the aforementioned Shoei full-face I still would have been treated to a cat scan that evening. The wounds all over the left side of my body made it clear that I did a high speed full-body SLAP onto the ground. If I'd been wearing a better helmet I'd be a little less hideous. But those IQ points were gone.

    Even our flimsy helmets, to the extent that they stay in place, help. The brim could keep your eyeball from being squished. They definitely save us some nasty scrapes and cuts. And honestly, some pretty serious blunt trauma too. I need to replace my aging Fox Flux. It's got several dents in it. In February when I was racing at Old Pueblo I SMACKED a low hanging branch as I went speeding under on my first night lap. Hurt, but what if it had hit my bare head?

    Landed right on the top of my head during my first night lap at 24 Sage this summer (hmmm, is there a pattern here)? I was on a solid slab of granite. I smacked down, my head pressed hard into the hat, and I did a slow grinding headstand finally falling onto my back and REALLY hurting myself. That would have been some kind of bad head bang on a bare head. It would have been bleeding a ton, and it would have had a far better shot at fracturing my skull...

    Brokefork, I agree. Head injuries are bad. And flimsy bike helmets don't save you from risk. But neither do 5 pound moto helmets if it's the right crash. A good bike helmet will definitely spare some of the meat outside of the skull, and sometimes they protect the meat inside pretty well too.

    The best way to manage risk is to know your limits and ride within them. But you won't be doing away with risk.
    Last edited by TomP; 12-26-2013 at 04:59 PM.
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  29. #29
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    Constant headaches, sleep disturbance, poor work performance and memory loss bother the owner of the brain injury. The personality changes get the rest of the family and it changes how even your loved ones feel about you when you get filthy angry because the fork fell off the plate again. Until the definition of minor traumatic brain injury is revised, all you will hear from most doctors is that it will get better over 18 months. It doesn't and only gets worse with each new injury. TBI = bad. Multiple TBI = becoming a new and lesser person.

  30. #30
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    I hit my noggin many times while mountain biking....I think?

    Is recommend watching "The Crash Reel" about Kevin Pearce and TBI's as a whole. Really really good movie.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Apparently, car crashes are the second leading cause of TBI's in the USA. Guess we should start wearing helmets on the drive to the trail head?
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71 View Post
    Apparently, car crashes are the second leading cause of TBI's in the USA. Guess we should start wearing helmets on the drive to the trail head?
    I know that is a joke and when the subject is TBI, most people are going to get upset about jokes. However, there is little of substance to answer the problem of TBI in recreation and I actually think Steve71's post exhibits the sort of knee-jerk reaction there has been to the subject - in a tongue-in-cheek way. The answer to TBI has not been helmets and frankly there is no answer to the physics of brain deceleration or rotation. Oh wait - expanding foam injected into your skull - time to legislate.

    The real issues are how, if at all can you avoid them while riding and what do you do about how even "mild" TBI screws up the life of the injured and their family. I don't have an answer to the latter.

    Riding within your limits, cautiously, may be the only measure suggested that deserves rider attention regarding avoiding brain injury. However, it is a Catch 22. A friend who is just in her second trimester of pregnancy (and a very good rider) remarked that riding cautiously made her slower and less able to cope with the trail. She said lower momentum made climbing harder, more scary for a stall-event and chewed more energy in the heat.

    I think failing to scan forward also makes riding "cautiously and within your limits" less safe than it sounds. If you are not prepared for what is coming, then the consequences start to rise and pace is not always the issue. Remember the little old aunty who died of pneumonia in hospital, because she had complications of her hip fracture surgery, because she fell in the living room, because she tripped on a rug, because her eyesight was bad and she was too unfit to save herself...... The MTB equivalent can occur on almost any grade of trail and we've all seen it.

    It's a very fine line between caution and tension.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71 View Post
    Apparently, car crashes are the second leading cause of TBI's in the USA. Guess we should start wearing helmets on the drive to the trail head?
    If someone is serious about mitigating risk, they should wear their full face *and* their DH armor EVERY time they get in a car.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokefork View Post
    And really not sure what head injuries and a sedentary lifestyle or obesity have in common with each other.
    uh... that's the point, Holmes
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    Riding within your limits, cautiously, may be the only measure suggested that deserves rider attention regarding avoiding brain injury.
    You're only addressing protecting yourself from yourself and IMHO ignoring the far greater risk of bike riding. The "other guy".

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    You're only addressing protecting yourself from yourself and IMHO ignoring the far greater risk of bike riding. The "other guy".
    Equipment failure is another source of badness. You can reduce that risk by taking care of your stuff.

    Maybe a decade ago I was on a ride with a bunch of hammerheads on the crest. At the end we popped out onto 285 and it was time to roll down the pavement to Poncha. This guy Ben who was super fast was with us, chased him all the way down the Rainbow. But then on the road my pavement-cracking mass allowed me to go off the front. Spinning out the big ring, Ben bridged to me and we rocked it down the highway, probably approaching 50 mph at times. Ben was running old-schewl UST tubeless, and his tires were done.

    I got to the bottom and I was all by myself. ¿Que Pasa? I thought to myself... Eventually the rest of the crew showed up. Ben's front tire had blown. The rim hit the pavement and slid out like it was on ice. He was all kinds of bruised and rashed. No head injury. This time.

    He could have had newer tires on his bike. We can all do more to keep our stuff in good shape. But sometimes it fails anyway. Unless you're going to ride the brakes all the way down the highway and keep your speed below 5 mph, you are exposing yourself to risk.

    How many of us accept that risk? If you're going to be a cyclist at all, what can you do to be utterly safe? Answer, you can't. You can manage your risk...
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

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  38. #38
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    My real problems from the concussions didn't start until I broke my back. This got me back into computer work and disrupted my sleep cycle. Staring at a computer monitor until 3-4am then going to bed once nodding off really compounds the problem, apparently. The bright monitor shuts down melatonin production, so even if you do get to sleep it isn't doing what it should, and now your neurotransmitters are even more out-of-whack. My neurologist was emphatic that just taking levadopa wasn't going to be enough, that I needed a full lifestyle change to keep my brain balanced enough for the meds to do their thing.

    So I bought an acoustic guitar and a puppy. Practicing the guitar for an hour before bedtime rests my eyes, gets me out of my usual "tech" mode, and provides aural stimulation -- all of which get my brain producing malatonin before I try sleeping. As a last resort, I'll take a melatonin supplement before bedtime.

    The puppy keeps me in the circadian day/night rhythm. Dogs thrive on routine. Before the puppy, I wasn't any good at keeping regular hours. For the past six months, I don't think I've stayed up 'til the wee hours more than a handful of times. The point is to keep your brain as naturally balanced as possible, otherwise you don't have a good baseline for meds like l-dopa to work.

    Some days I'm more symptomatic than others, more l-dopa is never the answer -- it's a drug which takes several weeks for dosage adjustments to have any effect. I can usually trace the problem to some mistake I've made, like not getting a good night's sleep (at night being very important). The other change I've made is with my pain pills. I now take 90% fewer of those than I was taking a year ago, but the big change is not taking them during the day -- only at bedtime to keep from waking up when the breakthrough pain hits.

    I'm a very private person who isn't predisposed to sharing my medical history with a bunch of strangers on a forum, but I post this because the articles written about concussions are mostly geared towards raising awareness, not what to do for those already afflicted by TBI-related issues. If you're in the same boat as me, it's time to quit partying all night, using electronic devices before bedtime, and such. Make some lifestyle changes, then talk to your neurologist about l-dopa, as this isn't very well-known unless you search pubmed for "dopamine +concussions" and go directly to the science, which can be tough to follow.
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  39. #39
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    Even without TBIs disrupted sleep patterns, poor diet, and excesses will cause poor memory and diminished cognitive abilities.

    I had all those issues (insomnia, rage issues, depression, etc.) before I stopped eating the **** that passes for food in this country. In my youth, I racked up 10+ concussions. The symptoms were gone within 3 months of changing my diet.

    A proper diet of whole foods does wonders for health. The body is amazing at repairing damage if given the proper base of nutrients from which to work.

    Learning how to fall is a key part of riding bikes. More protective gear is not always the answer. Growing up, I rode dirtbikes with hard-toe boots, a t-shirt, jeans, and a quality helmet. The rule was, "don't fall." Out on rides, we'd see people in full moto-armor, often we'd come upon them in a heap on the trail. Their gear gave them too much confidence and a racetrack mentality.

    Too much to worry about, I'm going riding. Rubber side down.

  40. #40
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    I hit my noggin many times while mountain biking....I think?

    With twins on the way, this thread reminds how careful I need to be out there.

  41. #41
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    Thanks for the replies. I was only pointing out that with the increase in extreme sports, be it biking, skiing, etc, the incidence of brain injuries will increase also. Brain injuries and their aftermath are not pretty and the research has now evidenced that even minor bumps on the head will have a cumulative effect, often revealing deficits in later ages. Victims and their families pay the price. So, just be aware, don't do crazy **** on the trails, be careful with your noggin. And yes, Steve, I know how you feel about taking risks and that you can get killed sitting in a restaurant when the ceiling falls in. Apples and oranges.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    <snip>
    Maybe a decade ago I was on a ride with a bunch of hammerheads on the crest. At the end we popped out onto 285 and it was time to roll down the pavement to Poncha. This guy Ben who was super fast was with us, chased him all the way down the Rainbow. But then on the road my pavement-cracking mass allowed me to go off the front. Spinning out the big ring, Ben bridged to me and we rocked it down the highway, probably approaching 50 mph at times. Ben was running old-schewl UST tubeless, and his tires were done.

    I got to the bottom and I was all by myself. ¿Que Pasa? I thought to myself... Eventually the rest of the crew showed up. Ben's front tire had blown. The rim hit the pavement and slid out like it was on ice. He was all kinds of bruised and rashed. No head injury. This time.
    Moral of the story: Don't ride road.


  43. #43
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    You guys should check out 6D helmets. They are supposed to really help with concussions and I've read a few first hand accounts that back up their claims. But still, time will tell. Hopefully they make something for the MTB market some day.

    And I was only 1/2 joking about wearing a helmet in an automobile. My uncle was killed in his late 20's (leaving behind three small children, one of which he never got to meet) due to a TBI. He was at work on a civil engineering project when the passenger van drove off said project and into the ocean. He was knocked out and drowned.

    Strangely enough, he was also the uncle that walked away from me (4 years old at the time) on the trampoline, leaving me unsupervised. A few mins later I came running inside with blood all over my head. I remember it like yesterday, and I know for sure had a concussion. Life sure is strange...
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  44. #44
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    Still shocking to me is the amount of skiers and snowboarders who are still not wearing helmets. Sure, there is a higher percentage of skiers/snowboarders wearing helmets than not but...

    Seems about 100% mtb on trail wearing helmets. Not the same for skiing and riding. Surprised the resorts have not moved towards making it mandatory yet.

  45. #45
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    Apparently, even a seven times f1 champion is not immune, and he was wearing a helmet.

    Formula 1 champion Michael Schumacher - CNN.com
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    Don't crash.

    Oh - and don't go "chasing down my buddy"... that's a bad idea. Especially if "my buddy" is IndecentExposure or FullTrucker. Just don't do it.

    That's all I got.
    Those guys ain't got sh!t on SylentK. Stay away from that jerk. I just cracked a rib following that guy down a hiker only trail.

    True story.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

  47. #47
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    wrong thread. sorry. delete.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post

    The real issues are how, if at all can you avoid them while riding and what do you do about how even "mild" TBI screws up the life of the injured and their family. I don't have an answer to the latter.

    Riding within your limits, cautiously, may be the only measure suggested that deserves rider attention regarding avoiding brain injury. However, it is a Catch 22. A friend who is just in her second trimester of pregnancy (and a very good rider) remarked that riding cautiously made her slower and less able to cope with the trail. She said lower momentum made climbing harder, more scary for a stall-event and chewed more energy in the heat.

    I think failing to scan forward also makes riding "cautiously and within your limits" less safe than it sounds. If you are not prepared for what is coming, then the consequences start to rise and pace is not always the issue. Remember the little old aunty who died of pneumonia in hospital, because she had complications of her hip fracture surgery, because she fell in the living room, because she tripped on a rug, because her eyesight was bad and she was too unfit to save herself...... The MTB equivalent can occur on almost any grade of trail and we've all seen it.

    It's a very fine line between caution and tension.
    I like this and agree fully.

    This sport is about concentration and mindfulness imo. If either slips there is a chance you may get hurt. In that way it is a moving meditation and I think this is the best way to approach it in terms of not hurting yourself. But, you are going to ride a mt bike so you also need to accept the possible consequences, otherwise you will be too cautious and tense, which will have the end result of manifesting your fear of injury into a reality. Consequences seem to be bruises up to death and anywhere in between. But as has been mentioned, you are taking the same kind of chance driving a car, and uncertainty is the nature of life, there is no use worrying about it.

    Also, I think the decision on how fast to go, how far to push things is very important. I think if you err too much in either direction you increase chances of injury. If you want to progress you need to accept a higher likelihood of injury, but done correctly can also increase and enhance concentration.... it is a delicate balance. Probably, just being immersed in the present moment and having fun without worry or competitive intent is the best way to avoid injury.

    Equipment... I have a nearly $700 Shoei moto helmet for dh and a POC for trail riding. Does not make any sense to me to skimp in this area. It should just be habit to wear the correct protective gear, not a reason to ride faster.
    .




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