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  1. #26
    Kaj
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    make sure that fox fork has been overhauled. We are seeing alot of 1 or 2 year old fox forks that are showing premature stanchion wear, and the uppers are needing to be replaced. These are forks with 100 hours of use or less. The fix is new uppers at $300+ including labor -- ouch
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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomethingRelatedToBiking View Post
    First off, do you own a full DH rig?

    If yes, then I highly recommend the Specialized Stumpjumper EVO.

    If no, then the Enduro or Enduro EVO.
    Agree.

    I couldn't find a Stumpy EVO at all this summer, but that was the bike I was zero'ing in on.

    Quote Originally Posted by SomethingRelatedToBiking View Post
    I've had Enduros before and they are just too close to the DH side of life, so the SJ seems to widen that gap while keeping me planted nicely.
    Agree x2. I sold my 2011 Enduro b/c it was a too DH oriented for my 'one-bike' quiver. Great bike mind you, but I hated long days in the saddle or extended climbs or sit-n-spin in the flats. Downhill, that bike was amazing. Confidence inspiring. But it compromised too much everywhere else to have as my main/only trail/AM bike.

  3. #28
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    Fox service interval is 40 or 50 ride hours. High-end requires high-end maintenance. That is why Enduro seals are the devil.

    Remedy is a great bike. My buddy is selling one. I'll get him off his ass and post some pictures.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomethingRelatedToBiking View Post
    Fox service interval is 40 or 50 ride hours. High-end requires high-end maintenance.


    _MK
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomethingRelatedToBiking View Post
    Fox service interval is 40 or 50 ride hours. High-end requires high-end maintenance. That is why Enduro seals are the devil.

    Remedy is a great bike. My buddy is selling one. I'll get him off his ass and post some pictures.
    I might be interested. Is it a large? what year? Thanks..

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrewnielson View Post
    Okay, so any thoughts on the Trek Remedy? I've got a great deal waiting for me that I can pull the trigger on. It's a like new 2011 Remedy 7 for $1100, which would give me room for upgrades. It's currently set up with 150mm Fox Float 32 and a 150mm Fox Float DVRC in the rear. Haven't heard from any Remedy lovers?
    i have a 2011 remedy 9 that i love. i've taken it everywhere from trestle/keystone to all day epic rides. the drivetrain was a little noisy and loose so i took off the big front ring and threw in a chain guide/bashguard for a 2 ring set up. its better than stock but i will likely put on a rear derailleur with a clutch to silent it even more. add a dropper post and go tubeless and you got one sick ride.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by hokiebrett View Post
    Agree.

    I couldn't find a Stumpy EVO at all this summer, but that was the bike I was zero'ing in on.



    Agree x2. I sold my 2011 Enduro b/c it was a too DH oriented for my 'one-bike' quiver. Great bike mind you, but I hated long days in the saddle or extended climbs or sit-n-spin in the flats. Downhill, that bike was amazing. Confidence inspiring. But it compromised too much everywhere else to have as my main/only trail/AM bike.
    Not trying to be contrary.. but, is a stumpy EvO really all that different than an Enduro.. we are talking maybe 1.5-2.0 lbs? An Enduro with a nice wheelset and set up tubeless will get you close..

    I love the enduro, just threw some hadley hubs and WTB laser TCS's on mine and rode the hell out of it over xmas (st george and vegas) and that bike is just so funny and easy to pedal (and much easier to find than the stumpy EVO).. to top it off, it does handle rough stuff, drops and jumps very well also..(btw, I was looking for a Stumpy EVO this summer and now I am glad I ended up with another Enduro)..

  8. #33
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    IMO, that Remedy w/ Fox 32 is underforked. Whatever weight it adds to go to bigger stanchions and 20mm TA would be worth it to me.

    I'm on a 2012 Enduro Comp, and I think it climbs pretty well, considering it's only got a 34t ring up front. With the 2.5 dhf exo's and a dropper post, it weighs around 30lbs. Given the choice, I'd like it to be lighter, but that's about all I'd change on it.

    If/ when I can pick up another dh bike, I'll like go back to a smaller trail bike though. It does seem a little like cheating on some of the frontrange trails.
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  9. #34
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    I've ridden most of the bikes mentioned, in and around the front range area and NONE of them compare to the Canfield The One.

    I'm on a '12 now and almost have it fully set up the way I want it, just need to finish converting over to a 1x10 with a 28t drive and a 9-36t in the back. With this setup I can almost promise that it will outclimb any of the aforementioned bikes, all while still in the 8" travel mode and ready to destroy any DH you can throw at it. This bike really puts a new meaning to "all mountain"...

    Also, the Canfield guys have customer service beyond compare, there are few in the business that keep their customers as close as these guys.

    Outstanding bikes backed by an upstanding company, couldn't ask for more!!

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRage43 View Post
    I've ridden most of the bikes mentioned, in and around the front range area and NONE of them compare to the Canfield The One.

    I'm on a '12 now and almost have it fully set up the way I want it, just need to finish converting over to a 1x10 with a 28t drive and a 9-36t in the back. With this setup I can almost promise that it will outclimb any of the aforementioned bikes, all while still in the 8" travel mode and ready to destroy any DH you can throw at it. This bike really puts a new meaning to "all mountain"...

    Also, the Canfield guys have customer service beyond compare, there are few in the business that keep their customers as close as these guys.

    Outstanding bikes backed by an upstanding company, couldn't ask for more!!
    Whats something like that weigh?
    My friend had an older one, he hated it, but that was the old design..

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josie7 View Post
    Not trying to be contrary.. but, is a stumpy EvO really all that different than an Enduro.. we are talking maybe 1.5-2.0 lbs? An Enduro with a nice wheelset and set up tubeless will get you close..

    I love the enduro, just threw some hadley hubs and WTB laser TCS's on mine and rode the hell out of it over xmas (st george and vegas) and that bike is just so funny and easy to pedal (and much easier to find than the stumpy EVO).. to top it off, it does handle rough stuff, drops and jumps very well also..(btw, I was looking for a Stumpy EVO this summer and now I am glad I ended up with another Enduro)..
    I would venture to say yes. A slightly different head angle as well as different ratios on the FSR lever arms. FSR doesn't have an anti-squat platform built into the design and is soley dependant on shock valving to setup the pedal resistance.

    The Enduro was an amazing bike. Please don't get me wrong there. It was phenominal on the downhills. I just felt that it was not efficient enough for me on the flats and longer rides.

    Again, I wanted a burly trail/light AM bike, which the Stumpy Evo is. The Enduro is geared more for AM and people love it. While wasn't the right bike for me, it's the great bike for many, many other riders.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josie7 View Post
    Whats something like that weigh?
    My friend had an older one, he hated it, but that was the old design..
    Mine's pretty heavy right now but I have some beefy parts I'm swapping out, shooting for around 34-35ish when I'm done. There are some full air builds sub 32 though

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by hokiebrett View Post
    I would venture to say yes. A slightly different head angle as well as different ratios on the FSR lever arms. FSR doesn't have an anti-squat platform built into the design and is soley dependant on shock valving to setup the pedal resistance.

    The Enduro was an amazing bike. Please don't get me wrong there. It was phenominal on the downhills. I just felt that it was not efficient enough for me on the flats and longer rides.

    Again, I wanted a burly trail/light AM bike, which the Stumpy Evo is. The Enduro is geared more for AM and people love it. While wasn't the right bike for me, it's the great bike for many, many other riders.

    nice comparison, thanks for making it more understandable..

  14. #39
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    So after much thought and research I ended up selling the Giant Reign for a 2010 Yeti ASR-7. Just finished building it up and had my first ride yesterday at UTE and was blown away by the capability of this bike.

    Last edited by andrewnielson; 01-20-2013 at 01:34 PM.

  15. #40
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    Nice ride. I wanted one of those for a while.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK_ View Post


    _MK
    Haha I didn't mean to sound like a KTM owner or something. My answer is what Fox would have said. I have rebuilt loads of Rock Shox forks that have been used and abuse, no maintenance ever, etc. and they revived back to working condition (some didn't of course). I don't know why Fox uses such a soft coating/aluminum but it might as well be made of margarine.

    I still think that if you want your fork to feel good you have to change the oil and wipers at least twice a year depending on use--even if that pushes you to 70 hours per change. Its like your car: oil change every 3000 miles or six months--whichever comes first. But for MTB forks it is 70 hours or leaks--whichever comes first.

    And just to put it out there to anyone reading this, quit putting chain lube on your wipers! you are making it worse. Use Liquid-O-RingŪ PM-600 Military Grease, preferably. Slather a small amount around the middle of each stanchion and cycle the fork a few times then wipe excess. The PM-600 purportedly dissolves more evenly in suspension oil than Slick Honey (clumps of grease in your oil affects oil flow).

  17. #42
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    After some new decals...

    Before:


    After:



  18. #43
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    is it just the angle or does the nose of your seat look like it is way high for suck a slack seat tube angle?

  19. #44
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    Nice bike, bud. That will do for out here for sure. Looks like a capable Wednesday night ride bike *cough cough*.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    is it just the angle or does the nose of your seat look like it is way high for suck a slack seat tube angle?
    Must be the angle and it's also the seat I snagged from my old Surly Moonlander. I'm waiting for my Yeti saddle to come in the mail.


    Quote Originally Posted by SomethingRelatedToBiking View Post
    Nice bike, bud. That will do for out here for sure. Looks like a capable Wednesday night ride bike *cough cough*.
    Gonna try to make it. Should know tomorrow night for sure though. Thanks for the invite!

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