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Thread: Haters

  1. #1
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    Haters

    I thought you were doing a roll call for Front Range haters so I was going to make sure my name is on the list.



    Hey, my computer is showing my post ahead of the OP. Damn Internet! If we can't have consistency here, then where?

  2. #2
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    Haters

    The haters have come at Lance again. This time they have "proof" he was doping. Impossible that he just was a lot better than anyone else and people don't like to get their ass kicked over and over. Have at it crybabies, maybe this time you'll bring him down.

  3. #3
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    "Investigating doping allegations against Lance" has a life of its own. It's a full-time job for the Lance Haters. They have their own reasons for continuing this charade, none of them have anything to do with proving any doping allegation to be true.

    What's crazy is that while this particular agency opens its new "investigation" they can put Lance on hold while they "investigate". De-facto guilty.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ithnu View Post
    i thought you were doing a roll call for front range haters so i was going to make sure my name is on the list.



    hey, my computer is showing my post ahead of the op. Damn internet! If we can't have consistency here, then where?
    ^:d

  5. #5
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    Pharmstrong...

    If he would just admit it and apologize, he could still be every Fred's hero. Hell, he'd even find a way to make money off it. The problem is he's a cocky d&#k about it and expects us to believe he's clean. It's insulting to our intelligence.

    Look at these guys who have been busted, apologized, and served their penalty. The fans still love them and they're still making plenty of $$ playing the sport the love. Basso, Millar, Vino, Giambi...

    Then look at the guys that are jerks about it and keep getting drug through the mud. Hamilton, Pharmstrong, Rasmussen, Canseco, Clemens, Bonds. People hate them and eventually chase them from the sport.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggs View Post
    Pharmstrong...

    If he would just admit it and apologize, he could still be every Fred's hero. Hell, he'd even find a way to make money off it. The problem is he's a cocky d&#k about it and expects us to believe he's clean. It's insulting to our intelligence.

    Look at these guys who have been busted, apologized, and served their penalty. The fans still love them and they're still making plenty of $$ playing the sport the love. Basso, Millar, Vino, Giambi...

    Then look at the guys that are jerks about it and keep getting drug through the mud. Hamilton, Pharmstrong, Rasmussen, Canseco, Clemens, Bonds. People hate them and eventually chase them from the sport.
    You sound like a Hater, Wiggs. I don't hate any of them. Why would you hate them? What a waste of mental energy.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  7. #7
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    And he's retired, so it's not like they're keeping him from overshadowing any new rising stars. What a waste of money. What I hate is the government thinks they need to be involved in sports. Why can't our tax money be spent on things that are actually important?
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    You sound like a Hater, Wiggs. I don't hate any of them. Why would you hate them? What a waste of mental energy.
    Just dickish Texans. George W., Perry, Pharmstrong.

    It doesn't take much energy, they make it really easy to hate them.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggs View Post
    Just dickish Texans. George W., Perry, Pharmstrong.

    It doesn't take much energy, they make it really easy to hate them.
    Ah, you hate Texans, so perforce you hate Lance. I see.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  11. #11
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    They also want to ban him from competing in triathlons, which is his new fling and which he is sure to dominate.

    They drinking pure hateraid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbabuser View Post
    And he's retired, so it's not like they're keeping him from overshadowing any new rising stars. What a waste of money. What I hate is the government thinks they need to be involved in sports. Why can't our tax money be spent on things that are actually important?

    Agreed!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokefork View Post
    The haters have come at Lance again. This time they have "proof" he was doping. Impossible that he just was a lot better than anyone else and people don't like to get their ass kicked over and over. Have at it crybabies, maybe this time you'll bring him down.
    It's not about hate. Do I hate Lance? No, why would I? I've never met the guy, he has never done anything wrong to me, why would I hate someone I don't know?

    It's about having a sense of reality. Do i think Lance was doped? Hell yeah. Do I think every single rider in the top 25 of any major tour is doped? Sure thing.

    Riding 2500 miles in 3 weeks and not having a single off day just doesn't happen without medical assistance.

    Look at it this way, it's all about economy. Pro tour teams need big sponsors and those sponsors wants results. In general all the riders are as fit as possible. The way to get ahead of the pack is by never having off days, in a race like the Tour it means getting your body replenished between days with iv-drops, painkillers and what not. Same deal with NFL players, they just don't survive the beating without being "juiced up" on anything that makes them forget the beating they took a couple of days ago.

    The doctors on any pro bike team knows exactly which substances are on the list and which aren't and they will use everything available to make the riders fit for the next days racing, it's their job to do so. Some riders might be doped legally, some illegally, but they are all doped if they are in the top of a big tour.

    Do I wish pro bike racing was clean? Sure. But it'll never happen when the money is that good, there will always be someone ready to juice up for victory and the rest has to follow suit to be competitive.

    Did I like watching Lance ride? Sure, awesome rider and great tactician, always fun to follow, but I don't for a second believe he got there without being at least as juiced up as the guys he raced against.

    Almost everyone Lance ever competed with in the Tour has been found guilty of doping. Do you honestly believe that Lance could dominate those suped up guys for a decade if he was clean as a whistle himself? Really?

    Lance was the best of the suped up guys in a field of suped up guys. I admire him for those wins, but don't pull my leg and try to convince me that Lance was the clean, honest superman in a pack of dopers..

  14. #14
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    If you got caught robbing a house and the cops said "we'll let you walk if you name another burglar" what would you do?

    Give them the name of someone you hate. Even if he is innocent.

  15. #15
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    Les grimpées, je m'en fou!

  16. #16
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    Whenever I hear discussion about Lance or doping.
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    Last edited by Moustache rider; 06-14-2012 at 10:03 AM.

  17. #17
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    Haters wanna hate, lovers wanna love, I don't even want none of the above..Dave Chappelle - Piss on You - YouTube

  18. #18
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    Just in:

    Lance Armstrong Wants To Tell Nation Something But Nation Has To Promise Not To Get Mad

    DALLAS—Saying that it would probably be best if everyone sat down for this, seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong informed the U.S. populace Thursday that he wanted to tell it something, but that the nation first had to promise it wouldn't get angry once he did.

    "Look, I'm not going to sugarcoat this. It's bad," Armstrong said during the nationally televised press conference. "But you have to swear to God that you won't get mad when I tell you, because if you get upset and yell about how you're really disappointed I'm just going to walk out of here."

    "Okay?" Armstrong continued. "You guys promise?"

    Armstrong then took a deep breath, massaged his forehead, murmured "Oh boy, here we go," and appeared for several moments to be on the verge of telling the nation his news. He seemed to lose his focus, however, commenting that it wasn't as if anything he was about to say would diminish the fact that he beat cancer or that his foundation has donated more than $250 million to cancer research.

    In addition, Armstrong said the American people had to promise that, following his announcement, they would resist the urge to remove their Livestrong bracelets and throw them away or burn them.

    "Okay, there's no easy way to put this, but, well, you guys know how I won a record seven consecutive Tours de France between 1999 and 2005?" said Armstrong, who took a sip of water as his hand visibly shook. "Well, this has to do with that. It also has to do with this impending federal investigation of my cycling team. What it absolutely does not have anything to do with is the fact that I am an inspiration to cancer sufferers worldwide—cancer sufferers who could potentially experience serious physical and emotional setbacks if you break your promise and get mad at me."

    Throughout the preamble to his announcement, onlookers reported getting the impression that Armstrong felt some need to defend what he was about to tell the country. The world's most successful cyclist spent almost 25 minutes telling the nation that, as a top-level international athlete, one has to do certain things to remain competitive; that he has no regrets; and that, given the chance to live his life again, he would do everything again the same way.

    Armstrong also repeatedly mentioned that he had beaten cancer.

    "You have to understand—in the high-pressure world of competitive cycling, it's all about getting any advantage you can," Armstrong said. "And if we were being realistic, we'd have to admit that everyone in cycling was trying to get an advantage. So, in a way, if we were all trying to get the same advantage, then the playing field was still completely equal. So I was still the best. It makes sense when you look at it that way. And nothing I am about to tell you changes that. So, when I'm finished saying what I have to say, you all have to promise to still adore me."

    "In fact, if you don't still adore me, and you suddenly get all huffy and say that I wasn't really a hero all these years, you are in the wrong here, not me," Armstrong added. "You. Not me."

    Armstrong then stood, paced back and forth for a moment, shook his head, and returned to the microphone.

    "You guys are not making this easy for me, that's for damn sure," he said. "This really shouldn't be hard. Because it's actually not even really that big of a deal. At all. Frankly, I don't even know why I'm here right now."

    Armstrong reiterated for a fifth and sixth time that he had beaten cancer.

    "Okay, here goes," Armstrong said. "Um, in the late '90s and early 2000s, I took, um… You see, in order to give myself a better chance of winning, I… Yes, there were instances during the Tour when…"

    "You know what? I forgot what I was going to say," Armstrong added. "Sorry. I feel like an idiot. Have a nice afternoon."


    Lance Armstrong Wants To Tell Nation Something But Nation Has To Promise Not To Get Mad | The Onion - America's Finest News Source
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debaser View Post
    Lance Armstrong Wants To Tell Nation Something But Nation Has To Promise Not To Get Mad

    DALLAS—Saying that it would probably be best if everyone sat down for this, seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong informed the U.S. populace Thursday that he wanted to tell it something, but that the nation first had to promise it wouldn't get angry once he did.

    "Look, I'm not going to sugarcoat this. It's bad," Armstrong said during the nationally televised press conference. "But you have to swear to God that you won't get mad when I tell you, because if you get upset and yell about how you're really disappointed I'm just going to walk out of here."

    "Okay?" Armstrong continued. "You guys promise?"

    Armstrong then took a deep breath, massaged his forehead, murmured "Oh boy, here we go," and appeared for several moments to be on the verge of telling the nation his news. He seemed to lose his focus, however, commenting that it wasn't as if anything he was about to say would diminish the fact that he beat cancer or that his foundation has donated more than $250 million to cancer research.

    In addition, Armstrong said the American people had to promise that, following his announcement, they would resist the urge to remove their Livestrong bracelets and throw them away or burn them.

    "Okay, there's no easy way to put this, but, well, you guys know how I won a record seven consecutive Tours de France between 1999 and 2005?" said Armstrong, who took a sip of water as his hand visibly shook. "Well, this has to do with that. It also has to do with this impending federal investigation of my cycling team. What it absolutely does not have anything to do with is the fact that I am an inspiration to cancer sufferers worldwide—cancer sufferers who could potentially experience serious physical and emotional setbacks if you break your promise and get mad at me."

    Throughout the preamble to his announcement, onlookers reported getting the impression that Armstrong felt some need to defend what he was about to tell the country. The world's most successful cyclist spent almost 25 minutes telling the nation that, as a top-level international athlete, one has to do certain things to remain competitive; that he has no regrets; and that, given the chance to live his life again, he would do everything again the same way.

    Armstrong also repeatedly mentioned that he had beaten cancer.

    "You have to understand—in the high-pressure world of competitive cycling, it's all about getting any advantage you can," Armstrong said. "And if we were being realistic, we'd have to admit that everyone in cycling was trying to get an advantage. So, in a way, if we were all trying to get the same advantage, then the playing field was still completely equal. So I was still the best. It makes sense when you look at it that way. And nothing I am about to tell you changes that. So, when I'm finished saying what I have to say, you all have to promise to still adore me."

    "In fact, if you don't still adore me, and you suddenly get all huffy and say that I wasn't really a hero all these years, you are in the wrong here, not me," Armstrong added. "You. Not me."

    Armstrong then stood, paced back and forth for a moment, shook his head, and returned to the microphone.

    "You guys are not making this easy for me, that's for damn sure," he said. "This really shouldn't be hard. Because it's actually not even really that big of a deal. At all. Frankly, I don't even know why I'm here right now."

    Armstrong reiterated for a fifth and sixth time that he had beaten cancer.

    "Okay, here goes," Armstrong said. "Um, in the late '90s and early 2000s, I took, um… You see, in order to give myself a better chance of winning, I… Yes, there were instances during the Tour when…"

    "You know what? I forgot what I was going to say," Armstrong added. "Sorry. I feel like an idiot. Have a nice afternoon."


    Lance Armstrong Wants To Tell Nation Something But Nation Has To Promise Not To Get Mad | The Onion - America's Finest News Source
    classic!

  20. #20
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    Dave Wiens wasn't a doper!


    There, added some actual mountain bike content.

  21. #21
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    I agree with pretty much everything you said except this part:
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandrenseren View Post
    Riding 2500 miles in 3 weeks and not having a single off day just doesn't happen without medical assistance.
    They did these distances in the pre-pharma days (pre-WWII -- heck, they went 3,570 miles in 1926), they just didn't do it as fast and, like you said, they had to put up with "off-days" and plan accordingly. In a very real way, that made the race more interesting -- they had to think about how hard they could go today 'cause they had to go tomorrow and they weren't getting IV rehydration or "vitamin B shots" or a couple of units of blood to wipe away the day's effort. All they got was a large plate of pasta, a glass of wine, and a massage -- so they had to measure their efforts. PEDs are as much about recovery as they are increasing top-end speed.

    Case-in-point, there's a guy who just set the "around the world" record on a bicycle and he averaged 200 miles a day everyday -- and he had no support! So yes, 2500 miles in three weeks is possible -- most of us could do it with a just a little increase in training, we just couldn't go near as fast.

  22. #22
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    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by misanthrope View Post
    I agree with pretty much everything you said except this part:
    They did these distances in the pre-pharma days (pre-WWII -- heck, they went 3,570 miles in 1926), they just didn't do it as fast and, like you said, they had to put up with "off-days" and plan accordingly. In a very real way, that made the race more interesting -- they had to think about how hard they could go today 'cause they had to go tomorrow and they weren't getting IV rehydration or "vitamin B shots" or a couple of units of blood to wipe away the day's effort. All they got was a large plate of pasta, a glass of wine, and a massage -- so they had to measure their efforts. PEDs are as much about recovery as they are increasing top-end speed.

    They were doping in the "old days" too. Amphetamines usually.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    They were doping in the "old days" too. Amphetamines usually.
    Not in the 20's & 30's. In the 50's and 60's, yeah stuff that worked started becoming available. Well, there is the famous photo of the guys smoking in the peleton in an early TDF, but that certainly wasn't performance enhancing. And amphetamines might get you through a day, but the price to pay was high (death ala Simpson or poor to nonexistent recovery) and a user would be toast the next day. Interestingly, while blood doping and EPO provide a clear advantage to most any rider, there is no good evidence that testosterone and HGH have any real performance enhancing effect (unless it's a mental effect, thinking you've gained an edge and ride accordingly).

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    They were doping in the "old days" too. Amphetamines usually.
    And nicotine.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

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