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  1. #1
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    Has any Front Ranger purchased one of those Chinese 29er frames?

    Just checking if anybody on this board took the chance and bought of them. I very curious to check one out.

  2. #2
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    PM Karate Chicken... he is sure to have picked up one of those bad boys.

  3. #3
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    Oh god, don't do that, it's been so nice and peaceful around here lately.

  4. #4
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    I know you're asking for someone on the front range, but there are lots of threads on MTBR about these frames and forks (and handlebars, etc). Seems like folks are pretty happy with them. Google "China Bike" and "China Direct Carbon Bike" and stuff like that- you'll find lots of info. I don't know anyone personally on the front range who has one, though.

  5. #5
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    Kind of thought my Niner carbon was manufactured there. And well it's awesome!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokefork View Post
    Oh god, don't do that, it's been so nice and peaceful around here lately.
    There has been a lull in the lulz

    Recylce, buy quality used:
    denver bicycles classifieds - craigslist

    The bikes there are moar Front Range specific than the Chineeze ones
    Last edited by WKD-RDR; 01-16-2012 at 01:12 PM.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  7. #7
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    I bought one three or four years ago. It was trash. The frame was not aligned, the brake mounts were not straight, and the components were the worst. I promptly sold it and bought a used frame from a reputable manufacturer.

  8. #8
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    Bs

    Most carbon frames are made in China/Taiwan.

    I'm pretty sure that the OP was talking about carbon 29er frames, which are cured in a machined metal mold. If one is not aligned, they all are. BTW, 29er carbon frames have only recently started to be available. The prices are dropping fast and I've got my eye on them. As soon as I see a singlespeed frame, I'm all over it.

    I bought a Chinese carbon road frame last Spring for less than $400 and it is sweet. Safety and liability aside, I cannot understand why the retail price for "name brand" frames are around $2K.

    -Chuck

    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    I bought one three or four years ago. It was trash. The frame was not aligned, the brake mounts were not straight, and the components were the worst. I promptly sold it and bought a used frame from a reputable manufacturer.

  9. #9
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    I've done my research and they seem like decent frames. I'm just hoping to meet up with somebody and take it for a quick spin.

  10. #10
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    I was gonna buy one, but Karate Chicken told me not to. Don't mess with the chicken. moar lulz please. Fail=win I think. All you newb's don't know s**t about frames. Buy American, love it or leave it.

  11. #11
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    I bit the bullet and build one up this summer. This is a pic of it during the build. I promise it's much dirtier now.





    Pro's:
    -Probably the cheapest way to get a 21lb hardtail.
    -Stiff frame that still absorbs the bumps.
    -Looks badass.
    -My first 29er, and I'm converted for life.

    Con's:
    -Rear tire/brake rotor clearance is extremely tight with Stan's ZTR hubs. Other hubs might do better, but I can barely fit a 160mm rotor in the rear.
    -Questionable warranty support (I haven't needed it yet, but I kind of doubt that the mfg would ever support their warranty.)
    -I was pretty nervous about the frame disintegrating beneath me for the first few months because the quality was fairly unknown at the time. It's survived a few hundred miles so far and I've learned to trust it.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCS5280 View Post
    I bit the bullet and build one up this summer. This is a pic of it during the build. I promise it's much dirtier now.


    Pro's:
    -Probably the cheapest way to get a 21lb hardtail.
    -Stiff frame that still absorbs the bumps.
    -Looks badass.
    -My first 29er, and I'm converted for life.

    Con's:
    -Rear tire/brake rotor clearance is extremely tight with Stan's ZTR hubs. Other hubs might do better, but I can barely fit a 160mm rotor in the rear.
    -Questionable warranty support (I haven't needed it yet, but I kind of doubt that the mfg would ever support their warranty.)
    -I was pretty nervous about the frame disintegrating beneath me for the first few months because the quality was fairly unknown at the time. It's survived a few hundred miles so far and I've learned to trust it.

    Let me know if you have any questions.
    I've been keeping my eye on these, do you know the model # / mfg of the one you have?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walt Disney's Frozen Head View Post
    I've been keeping my eye on these, do you know the model # / mfg of the one you have?
    Mine is the Hong-Fu FM-053. I mainly chose it because the bent toptube is sexy (and the frame geometry was what I was looking for, its very similar to the S-Works 29er).

  14. #14
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    Thanks MC! Is it the 18"? How does it descend?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckjoga View Post
    Most carbon frames are made in China/Taiwan.

    I'm pretty sure that the OP was talking about carbon 29er frames, which are cured in a machined metal mold. If one is not aligned, they all are. BTW, 29er carbon frames have only recently started to be available. The prices are dropping fast and I've got my eye on them. As soon as I see a singlespeed frame, I'm all over it.

    I bought a Chinese carbon road frame last Spring for less than $400 and it is sweet. Safety and liability aside, I cannot understand why the retail price for "name brand" frames are around $2K.

    -Chuck
    Crabon was never specified. The frame I bought was Aluminum and was junk. Sometimes, you get what you pay for.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweetglisse View Post
    Thanks MC! Is it the 18"? How does it descend?
    It's a 19" frame. It descends very well for a hardtail. It's very easy to control and it transitions between bumps smoothly. I wouldn't ride it at Winter Park or Keystone but it can handle pretty much anything else I throw at it.

    I threw a TALAS fork on the front, so I can switch from 95mm to 120mm of travel. I generally ride on 95mm, but if it gets really rough ill flip the switch and go to 120mm while descending.

  17. #17
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    20% of the Internet is consumed by discussions about Chinese carbon mountain and road frames. If you're willing to build it yourself and understand that you don't get the big-name warranty and a free 30-day tune-up, then the folks who do buy them seem to be pretty happy with them.

    Taking into account the service and warranty issues, the price differential on mountain frames is justifiable in most cases (in my opinion at least)... but the debate definitely heats up when you compare Chinese-made carbon road frames from the big-name manufacturers that can sell for $4k or more and the Chinese-made carbon road frames sold direct via E-bay or wherever for a fraction of the price.

  18. #18
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    disposable carbon HT 29ers..

    Perhaps, perhaps
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  19. #19
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    yes since china took over taiwan- I have they have all been aluminum or steel though. One of the posters has a bike pictured and it does look great, but...
    I don't think I would get a carbon one as a bike proud to ride until they can start handling manufacturing raw materials, childrens toys, baby formula, generic drugs/ infringed copyrighted stuff etc.with less ethical and quality issues.
    Plus wait till the dollar devalues more then they'll be really cheap.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydoug View Post
    yes since china took over taiwan- I have they have all been aluminum or steel though. One of the posters has a bike pictured and it does look great, but...
    I don't think I would get a carbon one as a bike proud to ride until they can start handling manufacturing raw materials, childrens toys, baby formula, generic drugs/ infringed copyrighted stuff etc.with less ethical and quality issues.
    Plus wait till the dollar devalues more then they'll be really cheap.


    I agree (if I understood you correctly) with the ethical issues (many of these frames are blatent ripoffs of US designed frames and I do feel bad for not supporting US companies) and potential quality issues. Chinese companies in general focus on high volume production at low prices. This can result in shoddy workmanship.

    I would argue that carbon layup takes a lot of knowledge and skill to do correctly. Due to this requirement of the craftsman being somewhat specialized/skilled, I feel that there is a lower risk of the frames being build by a 10 year old or some random person off the street (and thus shoddy workmanship which is a general stereotype of Chinese products). You're comparing the manufacturing of these frames to something as simple as a childrens toy, and I think they require a completely different level of competence from the company producing them.

    I think that topmounter is spot on with the risks associated with these frames, as well as what you lose from a customer service standpoint when you buy direct from overseas.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydoug View Post
    yes since china took over taiwan- I have they have all been aluminum or steel though. One of the posters has a bike pictured and it does look great, but...
    I don't think I would get a carbon one as a bike proud to ride until they can start handling manufacturing raw materials, childrens toys, baby formula, generic drugs/ infringed copyrighted stuff etc.with less ethical and quality issues.
    Plus wait till the dollar devalues more then they'll be really cheap.
    This is the best post ever.....apparently China now runs Taiwan and a devalued dollar makes Chinese products cheaper.......classic

  22. #22
    contains quinine
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    While I'm aware of where most things I buy are manufactured (Intense, Ventana, OnOne, & Redline are my current rides), other things like electronics are nearly impossible to source here. If you haven't listened to this you should, it is eye-opening:

    Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory | This American Life

    And no, it's not just Apple bashing.
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  23. #23
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    Mcs5280

  24. #24
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    Mcs 5280-

  25. #25
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    i will try this one more time!! what Derailleur Hanger did you use? the bike looks great!

  26. #26

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by fish-n-bike View Post
    i will try this one more time!! what Derailleur Hanger did you use? the bike looks great!
    They will sell you hangers with the frame for a few bucks each. I bought 3. Not sure what kind they are, but they fit.

    This thread is complete. KarateChicken has arrived.

  28. #28
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    Big question: why buy american?

    I have a Ventana El Ciclon and I love it. But it's an emotional response. I grew up in Sacramento and so I wanted a bike made nearby. Sherwood is a great guy. Very meticulous in his fabrication. Alignment, welding, heat treatment, powder-coating, and customer service. When you visit his works you will be totally infatuated with the man and his vision. He will take the time to show you around and you'll want one of his bikes.

    But, it isn't composite as are modern aircraft wings, xc ski poles, modern bike frames, bike forks, golf clubs, and on and on. The fact is that one can pop out composite, well-layed-up, frames out of a well-designed jig and get nearly identical results every time. The resultant frame will be lighter, better aligned, and stiffer than an alu frame.

    It's just that the chinese have the benefit of not having to have done it the "old" way and have put in the latest equipment (probably designed in the west) and so are not saddled with old factories and processes.

    If you want to see this in spades visit China and count cell phone towers. You won't see wooden telephone poles as they leap-frogged that technology and used western technology from the start.

    They are doing the same thing with bike frames. Get used to it.

  29. #29
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    To those who buy, might want to pick a lighter color so you can see if the resin yellows. If it does, you might want to be careful...
    UV degradation of resin was resolved a while back. But someone must still have a few tons of the stuff sitting around, trying to unload it for cheap...
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
    ╭∩╮( º.º )╭∩╮

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenGeezer View Post
    I have a Ventana El Ciclon and I love it. But it's an emotional response. I grew up in Sacramento and so I wanted a bike made nearby. Sherwood is a great guy. Very meticulous in his fabrication. Alignment, welding, heat treatment, powder-coating, and customer service. When you visit his works you will be totally infatuated with the man and his vision. He will take the time to show you around and you'll want one of his bikes.

    But, it isn't composite as are modern aircraft wings, xc ski poles, modern bike frames, bike forks, golf clubs, and on and on. The fact is that one can pop out composite, well-layed-up, frames out of a well-designed jig and get nearly identical results every time. The resultant frame will be lighter, better aligned, and stiffer than an alu frame.

    It's just that the chinese have the benefit of not having to have done it the "old" way and have put in the latest equipment (probably designed in the west) and so are not saddled with old factories and processes.

    If you want to see this in spades visit China and count cell phone towers. You won't see wooden telephone poles as they leap-frogged that technology and used western technology from the start.

    They are doing the same thing with bike frames. Get used to it.
    In other words:

    "I bought a custom US made frame for all these reasons, but buying a cheap Chinese frame is no worse than all this crap I listed about a custom US made frame."

    Are you confused?

  31. #31
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    The larger point here is that the United States needs to retool. The most modern equipment and processes are being installed in places like China while the U.S. languishes. We need infrastructure development here!

    The Chinese have a national industrial plan while the U.S. has none. Those who profess to want small government would doom the U.S. to more of the same.

    Just face it, composite bikes are better than steel or aluminum and even titanium. Lighter, stiffer, fatigue resistant, and very easy to manufacture, in quantity, to tight tolerances once the tooling capital has been sunk.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenGeezer View Post
    The larger point here is that the United States needs to retool. The most modern equipment and processes are being installed in places like China while the U.S. languishes. We need infrastructure development here!

    The Chinese have a national industrial plan while the U.S. has none. Those who profess to want small government would doom the U.S. to more of the same.
    I can't believe you like irony too. We should hang out.


    Just face it, composite bikes are better than steel or aluminum and even titanium. Lighter, stiffer, fatigue resistant, and very easy to manufacture, in quantity, to tight tolerances once the tooling capital has been sunk.
    The sales pitch for carbon hasn't changed in decades, but I've ridden, warrantied and replaced enough carbon frames to understand that in the real world carbon is not without its cons.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenGeezer View Post
    .....

    It's just that the chinese have the benefit of not having to have done it the "old" way and have put in the latest equipment (probably designed in the west) and so are not saddled with old factories and processes.
    .......
    I don't get that. They ride a lot of bikes and were doing it the "old way" for a long time. This is just the natural evolution. I lived in Taiwan in the 70's and one of our field trips was to a huge factory that made bicycles. I'm talking about making every single part of the bicycle. There was no UPS man delivering SRAM and Rockshox components. Only raw materials in and bicycles out. At the time, if you drove down any street, the bikes outnumbered cars by at least 20:1.

    The fact that they now make most of the carbon fiber frames and bikes that we buy should not be unexpected.

    My aluminum Cannondale frame proudly says "Made in the U.S.A" in 3 places and my Specialized carbon frame had a little sticker that said made in Taiwan. The Specialized is still a really nice bike.

    -Chuck

  34. #34
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    <div style="background-color:#000000;width:520px;"><div style="padding:4px;"><embed src="http://media.mtvnservices.com/mgid:cms:video:thedailyshow.com:405953" width="512" height="288" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowFullScreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" base="." flashVars=""></embed><p style="text-align:left;background-color:#FFFFFF;padding:4px;margin-top:4px;margin-bottom:0px;font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;"><b><a href="http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mon-january-16-2012/fear-factory">The Daily Show with Jon Stewart</a></b><br/>Get More: <a href='http://www.thedailyshow.com/full-episodes/'>Daily Show Full Episodes</a>,<a href='http://www.indecisionforever.com/'>Political Humor & Satire Blog</a>,<a href='http://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow'>The Daily Show on Facebook</a></p></div></div>
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  35. #35
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    Just came across this: On One 456 Carbon. It's UK produced and damn reasonable.

    I like steel, so I'm sticking to the Summer Season.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Just came across this: On One 456 Carbon. It's UK produced and damn reasonable.

    I like steel, so I'm sticking to the Summer Season.
    UK "finished". QC and paint in the UK. Maybe a bottom bracket chase if'n yer lucky.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowtron View Post
    UK "finished". QC and paint in the UK. Maybe a bottom bracket chase if'n yer lucky.
    At least there is quality control and a thread chase (and I'm feeling lucky).

    Seems, people aren't happy unless there is some point of conflict.

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