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Thread: Hamilton's Book

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    Hamilton's Book

    Anyone else read it?

    Once I picked it up I couldn’t put it down. For the Lance tifosi the book doesn’t really bash him, but it does go into some detail on how the Postal doping program worked. I wish I had footage from the 99 tour it would be something if you could see Motoman coming and going in the back ground during the end of stage interviews.

    After reading between the lines of what was presented I have a feeling this all might have been avoided if Lance wasn’t so vindictive, but that is just my opinion.

    I’m kind of bummed for Dave Wiens though, now I think he might have been robbed in 2009.

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    Pretty soon there'll be books about every team from every era, about how they all doped. See, level playing field!
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    If you read the book it wasn't really a level playing field if you had a natural hematocrit level in the mid to high 40's forget your hopes to be a top pro back then.

    Based on the book up to 98 all the doping programs were team based, after that a lot more was placed on the rider with some help from the team.

    Also this post wasn't meant to be an attack at Lance.

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    The problem is, as much as I like Tyler as a bike racer, he kind of shot his credibility. That's not to say everything in the book might not be true, but after the whole "maybe it's my long lost twin" bit and everything else, I have a hard time putting total faith in what he says, especially since he's probably be financially ruined and needs to make money.

    It's the same thing with Floyd. After all his lies, asking for and taking money from people and all that, how much faith do you want to put in a tell all book?

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    I somewhat agree. With this being America we should see some libel lawsuits here shortly if this was all made up. If the lawsuits don't come well.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm View Post
    The problem is, as much as I like Tyler as a bike racer, he kind of shot his credibility. That's not to say everything in the book might not be true, but after the whole "maybe it's my long lost twin" bit and everything else, I have a hard time putting total faith in what he says, especially since he's probably be financially ruined and needs to make money.

    It's the same thing with Floyd. After all his lies, asking for and taking money from people and all that, how much faith do you want to put in a tell all book?
    I disagree and think both of these guys are finally telling us the truth. Granted you can't take anything they said during their denial, but I've met plenty of ex-addicts that were untrustworthy during their addiction, but sobered up and are totally different people today. It's time to support them as they work to expose what happened, and why they made the choices they made. Doping will never stop as long as no one recognizes we had (have) a problem, and choose to move forward.

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    Kaj
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    It's a sad story. people willing to do anything to keep their jobs as a cyclist. as a fan it's super interesting read too.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbsbiker View Post
    I disagree and think both of these guys are finally telling us the truth. Granted you can't take anything they said during their denial, but I've met plenty of ex-addicts that were untrustworthy during their addiction, but sobered up and are totally different people today. It's time to support them as they work to expose what happened, and why they made the choices they made. Doping will never stop as long as no one recognizes we had (have) a problem, and choose to move forward.
    I think you're confusing non-addictive performance enhancing drugs with addictive recreational drugs.
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    zrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaj View Post
    It's a sad story. people willing to do anything to keep their jobs as a cyclist. as a fan it's super interesting read too.
    Well, part of it is that winning is everything. Everybody loves a winner and nobody loves a looser. If you're going to make any kind of a decent living at bike racing you need to be able to perform at a super human level, the fans expects it and therefore the sponsors expect it. PEDs have been a part of sport, and especially endurance sports for a long, long time and it's what a person has had to do to compete at the highest level.

    I'm not saying that's good. It's kind of the dirty little underbelly of pro sports, but people don't pay much attention to just really good athletes, they pay attention to men and women who perform unbelievable feats of faster, higher, longer, and stronger. Given that reality, it's not surprising that PED use is common when a persons career is at stake.

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    Mtb

    Just makes me wonder how much of the PEDs have made their way into MTB. The Pro races are much shorter, except for the endurance events, but I wouldn't think it's anywhere near the same problem, or any at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by claystrick View Post
    Just makes me wonder how much of the PEDs have made their way into MTB. The Pro races are much shorter, except for the endurance events, but I wouldn't think it's anywhere near the same problem, or any at all.
    I am wondering the same thing too. Look at the recent XC World results, the highest placed person from North America was 18th, with the Todd Wells being the highest placed American at 35th.

    Our the Europeans that much better or is it something else???

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    Quote Originally Posted by MulletSlayer View Post
    I am wondering the same thing too. Look at the recent XC World results, the highest placed person from North America was 18th, with the Todd Wells being the highest placed American at 35th.

    Our the Europeans that much better or is it something else???
    PED's are in my mind, almost assuredly part of pro MTB'ing, and every other pro sport for that matter. And I don't think the problem could be regional. Look on the internet. On line sport supplement companies sell legal "prohormones" that are actually very effective anabolic steroids that have somehow skirted the definition in the law. Not that its difficult to get the real stuff as well.
    If you want to be the best, and you figure the competition is doing everything they possibily can to be the best, it is hard to not come to that unfortunate conclusion that you need PED's to win.

    I frequent a fitness forum where talk of AAS is commonplace. Most shocking to me is how many women are doing them now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by claystrick View Post
    Just makes me wonder how much of the PEDs have made their way into MTB. The Pro races are much shorter, except for the endurance events, but I wouldn't think it's anywhere near the same problem, or any at all.
    I've always thought it was worse.

    This is what I don't get. What is Vaughters hoping to accomplish by dragging everyone's name through the mud? I hope they sue him for libel.
    His own riders? I've never cared for Vaughters but geez.


    "On 7 September, UCI president Pat McQuaid said the UCI has asked the USADA to provide the UCI with the files of Tom Danielson, Christian Vande Velde and David Zabriskie after their team manager, Jonathan Vaughters, suggested that the three had doped in the past. [436] [437]"



    And as far as the race length. It's just a different type of PED. You eat dballs to bulk up instead of using EPO for O2.

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    Kaj
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleTrail View Post
    I
    This is what I don't get. What is Vaughters hoping to accomplish by dragging everyone's name through the mud? I hope they sue him for libel.
    His own riders? I've never cared for Vaughters but geez.
    The current thought I've heard is Vaughters knows that him and his riders are going to be outed. Maybe from the riders own admissions to USADA that will be public when the Lance file is made public.

    So JV is trying to "soften" the blow by outing them himself and saying why it's ok to have past dopers on his team now that they are "clean". Basically a PR move.

    On 2 previous comment I disagree on 2 thoughts. 1 that if they all doped it's a level playing field. That's one of the main points of Hamilton's book. The guys with most resources could dope at a much higher level than those with out. better doctors, better equipment, more crew members to move the dope around etc. So the doping just kept the playing field as unequal as ever. I agree with this point.

    The second is that the sport is more exciting if the riders dope because they are going faster. It's not anymore exciting to watch riders going 18mph up a mountain then 15mph, it's the competition between the riders that makes it fun. I don't care if a new record gets set up Alpe d'Huez every year, I'd rather watch 2 or 3 riders trying to break each other in close competition.

    Now if PED's let riders launch 60 foot gaps more than I'd be wrong and that would be more exciting. I think that's just pot though
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