Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 49
  1. #1
    Loser
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    471

    Had My First Run In With a Dog Today...

    !Rant alert!

    I have only been riding for about a year and a half now and have had nothing but positive experiences with other trail users (besides DH guys in full armor...but thats to be expected right?). Most peoples dogs are very well behaved, and even the ones that get in your way aren't that hard to go around. Today, that changed. I got taken out by a Chihuahua. Yes, you read that correctly, a Chihuahua. I was at the end of my ride, riding down the road/trail from Flatirons Vista towards 93 to the parking lot at GB Plateau, where my car was. As many of you know this trail is probably 15 feet wide or so, plenty of room for everyone to pass eachother. Two woman were approaching me with a Chihuahua on a leash, so I slowed down slightly but kept my course. I stayed on the far right of the trail, they were on the left, just like on a road. Right when I got within 15 feet of them, the lady decided to DROP the dogs leash and it immediately charged at my front tire, growling and barking. I tried to go from 20-0 mph in about 10 feet, locking up both of my tires. In order to not kill the stupid thing (I probably should've just ran it over...not a fan of little dogs like Chihuahua's), I had to lay the bike down. I got launched off the bike, landing on my shoulder/elbow.

    So what do these two lovely people do? They stand there, looking at me, in complete silence. Not a word of apology, or even bothering to ask if I was okay. I sat there for a minute on the ground, picking gravel out of my arm/leg and checking my bike (which now sports an awesome gash all along the right side of the top tube. Also, my rear hanger appears to be bent...). Still, complete silence from them. Then the one who dropped the leash walks over to the dog, grabs the leash and continues walking up the trail, as if nothing had happened. I am still in complete shock over what happened. It was probably one of the biggest WTF moments of my life. Usually if people's dog does something like that (run you off the trail etc), they at least say sorry, or ***** at you, saying it was your fault etc.

    I am all for having dogs on the trail. When my golden was still alive (RIP) I would take him with me hiking. I honestly just don't even know what to say about this though. Why would you have your dog on a leash, and then decided to drop the leash when a bike is 15 feet away from you? The thing that bugs me the most was their (lack of) response.

    So, all in all, todays ride sucked. Time to go extract more gravel from my arm. Yay!

    Moral of story: Beware of vicious killer attack chihuahuas on the trails.


  2. #2
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    This is a joke right?

    I little tiny dog caused you all this grief?

    Let me just add this. You have no sense of how speed affects other people do you?

    You slowed down to 20 mph when those people approached and you thought that was slow? They probably thought they were doomed. Then you had to drive it down to zero when the dog came along...wow, you should have seen that one coming.

    20 mph is not slow when encountering people, expecially with a dog.

    Sorry, no sympathy for your rant here bud.

    I do have sympathy for issue with people hogging super wide trails. That is a big issue with me, but not much can be done. We have the speed so we have to lead.

  3. #3
    Yappy little dog!
    Reputation: schnauzers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,881
    Quote Originally Posted by MCS5280
    !Rant alert!

    I have only been riding for about a year and a half now and have had nothing but positive experiences with other trail users (besides DH guys in full armor...but thats to be expected right?). Most peoples dogs are very well behaved, and even the ones that get in your way aren't that hard to go around. Today, that changed. I got taken out by a Chihuahua. Yes, you read that correctly, a Chihuahua. I was at the end of my ride, riding down the road/trail from Flatirons Vista towards 93 to the parking lot at GB Plateau, where my car was. As many of you know this trail is probably 15 feet wide or so, plenty of room for everyone to pass eachother. Two woman were approaching me with a Chihuahua on a leash, so I slowed down slightly but kept my course. I stayed on the far right of the trail, they were on the left, just like on a road. Right when I got within 15 feet of them, the lady decided to DROP the dogs leash and it immediately charged at my front tire, growling and barking. I tried to go from 20-0 mph in about 10 feet, locking up both of my tires. In order to not kill the stupid thing (I probably should've just ran it over...not a fan of little dogs like Chihuahua's), I had to lay the bike down. I got launched off the bike, landing on my shoulder/elbow.

    So what do these two lovely people do? They stand there, looking at me, in complete silence. Not a word of apology, or even bothering to ask if I was okay. I sat there for a minute on the ground, picking gravel out of my arm/leg and checking my bike (which now sports an awesome gash all along the right side of the top tube. Also, my rear hanger appears to be bent...). Still, complete silence from them. Then the one who dropped the leash walks over to the dog, grabs the leash and continues walking up the trail, as if nothing had happened. I am still in complete shock over what happened. It was probably one of the biggest WTF moments of my life. Usually if people's dog does something like that (run you off the trail etc), they at least say sorry, or ***** at you, saying it was your fault etc.

    I am all for having dogs on the trail. When my golden was still alive (RIP) I would take him with me hiking. I honestly just don't even know what to say about this though. Why would you have your dog on a leash, and then decided to drop the leash when a bike is 15 feet away from you? The thing that bugs me the most was their (lack of) response.

    So, all in all, todays ride sucked. Time to go extract more gravel from my arm. Yay!

    Moral of story: Beware of vicious killer attack chihuahuas on the trails.

    You should have called the Ranger's office and reported it. Don't let this go unchecked.

    BTW, NEVER adopt/buy a dog on the top 113 most popular dog list unless you do a lot of research into it's background or conduct some tests. They are over-bread. Especially, Chihuahua's. Number one over-bread dog? Golden Retriever. Beware! Number one reported problem dog to JeffCo Animal Control? Golden Retriever. That's right, not an American Staffordshire Terrier.

  4. #4
    This is how it started...
    Reputation: sdsantacruzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    290
    I do a lot of driving with my job and live by the philosophy that if a deer runs in front of me on the highway I will take it out. If you try to avoid it you may end up rolling down the road side and end up worse off. Sound familiar?
    Should I will live by that philosophy on the trail with dogs too? I am one to probably be more courteous on the trail than should be deserved but if the same thing would have happened to me I would have just fisted the bars and rode it out.
    The lady that let go of the leash knows damn well how her dog reacts to such things and was irresponsible for doing so. But I do agree with lidarman, 20mph was a little excessive that close to them, but that was your decision.
    I do know that if it would have been a cat, lidarman would have scared the crap out of it. ;^)
    Life is about the ride.

  5. #5
    Loser
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    471
    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    This is a joke right?

    I little tiny dog caused you all this grief?

    Let me just add this. You have no sense of how speed affects other people do you?

    You slowed down to 20 mph when those people approached and you thought that was slow? They probably thought they were doomed. Then you had to drive it down to zero when the dog came along...wow, you should have seen that one coming.

    20 mph is not slow when encountering people, expecially with a dog.

    Sorry, no sympathy for your rant here bud.

    I do have sympathy for issue with people hogging super wide trails. That is a big issue with me, but not much can be done. We have the speed so we have to lead.
    Its a huge road...their dog was on the far left side, sniffing the bushes as I approached. They had plenty of time to see me coming towards them, its not like I surprised them. I was on the far right side, basically hugging the edge of the trail. Am I supposed to slow down to 2 mph when I have a large amount of space to pass them, especially on a trail that wide? I always slow down for pedestrians/dogs/horses etc whenever the trail is narrower, but this is a wide gravel road. Its not like I am on singletrack or anything... Had the dog simply pulled on the leash it would've come nowhere near me. Had I seen that the dog was off-leash I would've slowed down considerably, because I know how dogs can accidentally come towards you. Her dog was on a short leash, and from what I could see, completely under her control. Instead, she decided to drop the dogs leash, which almost resulting in the dog being seriously injured/killed. Why on earth would you just let go of a dogs leash like that?

    I fail to see how I am at fault in this situation...

  6. #6
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    ...................
    Last edited by lidarman; 02-07-2009 at 06:25 PM.

  7. #7
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    10,495
    You should've gotten up, grabbed the dog, and bit its head off. That would've shown that little bahstid who was alpha.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rdw0123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    I like to take my dog hiking on leash where there are mountain bikers. Unfortunately, he gets a little freaked out and is is aggressive toward mountain bikes. I blame it on the fact that he is not too bright. I would NEVER let him off leash around a mountain bike. This was certainly not your fault. Sadly, there are bad dog owners out there and you encountered one. I hope that you are OK. I would not want that to happen to me when I am riding.

  9. #9
    I want cookies!
    Reputation: playzNmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    24
    Personally, I warn and any rider (of a horse) I am approaching and to ask if okay pass them when approaching from the rear. I ALWAYS pull to the side and stop when they are approaching...I do NOT want to spook a horse or creature of that size...

    I approach all pedestrians with some courtesy and tell them approaching from rear, and I slow way down and way over for a polite pass... now I expect the same in return and had that dog attacked me, and especially if it seemed she dropped leash intentionally - sorry but I would have kicked the dog

    but that's me.

    oh, and I don't have the ability to turn my cheek, I become cheeky and I guarantee I would have said something to that owner...

  10. #10
    ..ouch
    Reputation: thump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,957
    Quote Originally Posted by MCS5280
    .. and it immediately charged at my front tire, growling and barking. I tried to go from 20-0 mph in about 10 feet, locking up both of my tires. In order to not kill the stupid thing (I probably should've just ran it over...not a fan of little dogs like Chihuahua's), I had to lay the bike down...
    bunny hop

  11. #11
    Stiff yet compliant
    Reputation: Moustache rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,902
    Dude, the dog wasn't trying to attack you. He was going to offer you a Chalupa.
    You have some gall to question his motives.

  12. #12
    I want cookies!
    Reputation: playzNmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by thump
    bunny hop
    there is always that option

    as twitchy as those dogs are (rat's on acid) it would jump right under the landing bike lol

  13. #13
    My leg feels funny
    Reputation: liqwid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,098
    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    You should've gotten up, grabbed the dog, and bit its head off. That would've shown that little bahstid who was alpha.
    You've been listening to too much Ozzy.

  14. #14
    My leg feels funny
    Reputation: liqwid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,098
    Quote Originally Posted by Moustache rider
    Dude, the dog wasn't trying to attack you. He was going to offer you a Chalupa.
    You have some gall to question his motives.
    Yo quero "tire massage"?

  15. #15
    now in superlight!
    Reputation: daddyguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    130
    But I don't remember a Taco Bell nearby that trailhead...Sorry you had a bad ending to your ride- unfortunately i don't know the rules to playing Chihuahua/ chicken
    If you don't stop whining- I'll call the whaaaa-mbulance!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    34

    Riding in Boulder and Jeffco

    When I'm climbing I'm not going to fast so generally hikers yield to me. When descending I slow to a crawl for hikers. As I pass I greet them and wish them a good hike. My goal is to be a good ambassador for our sport and I've met some nice people along the way.

    I suspect it is possible the couple you encountered felt your speed was excessive. Especially if many other rides slow down much more. It really doesn't matter what we think. Its what the hikers think. Heck a rock could have got kicked up and hit them. So they're instinctive reaction might have been to let go of the leash and see what happened. Heck they may have been surprised at their own response. It sucks. I know. Its like road rage. Both parties did somethings incorrectly. I'd take this as a learning experience. Definitely slow down but don't sacrifice your safety if a small animal is in your line.

    Ridesyeti

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,416
    Yeah, I'm with Skared...at the VERY least, you should have "marked" the dog and possibly the owners. That usually trains them all. I do slow down a lot since some dogs can be jumpy or skittish and dart around when surprised or simply when they see a bike. If that fails, I just mark them all and move on.

  18. #18
    Born With A Tail
    Reputation: M-Train's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    132
    I can see how you would be pissed, but in restrospect you have to admit: THAT IS FUNNY. I sometimes get annoyed with hikers, bikers, drivers, etc.. but I think the best motto is: "No quarter- none asked, none given." Never expect anybody to act sensibly.
    Tequila tonight, tomorrow we ride!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    219
    I have empathy for the crash. Sucks to have a negative encounter, pick gravel out of the skin and scratch the bike in this way.

    That being said....

    As others have said, in my opinion a little fast when approaching, especially without some type of communication with the other user.

    How did you not say something after the crash! Still trying to envision the incident... You are riding, dog runs towards you, you crash in a blaze of glory, you are sitting there bleeding... and you say nothing? They say nothing? I can not even picture this.

    Not saying you should rant and rave, cry or berate. But how is it possible NO COMMUNICATION occurred?

    Been riding 23+ years and too many crashes near other users or similar dog encounters to count. Always something is said. Either anger or laughter, but some response. Maybe it is just me, but I talk to everyone as I pass. Hell I usually talk to the dogs too. I have even been known to talk to forest animals and the Mountain Gods on a long ride. That is just me.

    Not trying to sound too judgemental, we are all different. To avoid potential conflict in the future, try to communicate with other users a little more before you are within contact zone and as you pass. That way there are less surprises for both parties.

    All that being said, I have played this scenario in my head and even if I had crashed. As I was picking myself and bike up, there would have been some discussion about the incident with the dog walkers. They need to control their dog.

    Not controlling your dog in public puts all users, ages and the dog itself in danger. No excuses for them!

    Heal fast, Ride safe!

    Tim

  20. #20
    Loser
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    471
    Honestly I was just so stunned at what had just happened, I didn't really think of saying anything (besides groaning in pain after I landed). The whole situation was just surreal, especially with them being completely silent. I forgot to mention this in the initial post, but they looked Eastern European (Russian or Ukrainian maybe), so maybe they didn't know english? Still, they could've at least tried to say something or help me up. I probably should've said something, but it wouldn't have been a nice comment if I did...I was just in shock I think. After they got up and left I came to my senses and started to realize what happened, but by they were already walking away, and I was more concerned with the damage to my bike at that point.

    A lot of people are talking about communication with other trail users. I just want to share my approach to this, feel free to critique. If I am approaching someone from behind I always let them know I am there, and ask if I can pass. Usually from the front, eye contact is enough (unless the trail is too narrow for us to pass each other safely, then I always initiate contact and yield when appropriate). I always say "hello", or "have a nice day" when we pass. On most trails there is a long enough sight distance that they can see you coming and have plenty of time to react without getting surprised. The only exception to this, in my opinion, is for loose dogs and horses. I always slow down to crawl or dismount, since their behavior can be unpredictable. Dogs on leash are usually kept under control, but I will slow down to a crawl if the trail is narrow.

    In my opinion, the section of trail I was on is different though. I have had OSMP rangers drive their trucks past me on this section of trail, leaving me with plenty of room to ride. This should be sufficient room for a biker and two hikers to pass each other without coming into contact. I think of the "trail" I was on as a road (its the section right before the main gate if you are coming from the Doudy Draw parking lot), you always drive/walk/ride on your right hand side. On roads, you don't need to communicate with oncoming traffic, since they will always stay on their side, and you stay on your side. The two ladies with the dog did exactly that, staying on their side of the "road". I stayed on my side of the road, basically hugging the shoulder. Unfortunately, her dog didn't know the protocol. Had she held onto the leash, it would've maybe pulled towards me, but would've still given me a large area to pass. The individual holding the dog was on far left side of the road from my perspective, and her companion was walking next to her. If it was a larger dog, like a lab or golden retriever, I would've slowed down, since they are capable of pulling their owners when they want to say hello. Chihuahuas are not strong enough to do something like that, and should be easily kept under control. In my opinion, her dropping the little ankle-biters leash is equivalent to me going onto their side of the path and barreling straight towards them at 35 mph. Completely irresponsible.

    In other news, what's the best way to unbend a rear hanger?

  21. #21
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    10,495
    Quote Originally Posted by MCS5280

    In other news, what's the best way to unbend a rear hanger?
    Get a new one.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    34
    I hear ya. Wide enough road....I don't doubt they had plenty of space. Who knows. They could be real pricks or perhaps equally stunned and here illegally and scared about drawing attention. A buddy of mine who was hit by a car encountered that scenario. They didn't say a word.

    You have exactly 10 more minutes more to think about this situation, learn what you can from it, whatever that is for you, and then quit rehearsing it in your mind. Forget it. You sound like you're not massively injured and your bike is repairable. Things could be much worse.

    Ridesyeti

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,817
    Quote Originally Posted by schnauzers
    You should have called the Ranger's office and reported it. Don't let this go unchecked.
    F@ck?! In related news... the wind was out of the north today. I called a ranger to report it.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    132
    Do you have a 26er or 29er? I am guessing a 29er would have been more advantageous in this case.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hungryhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    355
    Quote Originally Posted by jugdish
    F@ck?! In related news... the wind was out of the north today. I called a ranger to report it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •