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  1. #1
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    Forest Circus Action

    Arapaho & Roosevelt National Forests Pawnee National Grassland - News & Events
    Under Stage II fire restrictions the following acts are prohibited on the ARP:
    No open fire, except when using a petroleum stove, grill, or lantern with a buffer cleared of all vegetation on all sides for at least three feet.
    Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building.
    Possessing or using fireworks or other pyrotechnic device.
    Using an explosive.
    Using any internal or external combustion engine (including chainsaws) without a spark arresting device properly working.
    Possessing or using a vehicle off National Forest System Roads, except when parking in areas completely cleared of all vegetation and operating a vehicle as described in a valid ARP Motor Vehicle Use Map.
    Welding, or operating acetylene or other torch with open flame.
    Discharge of a firearm, except when possessing a valid Colorado hunting license while lawfully involved in hunting and harvesting game during the appropriate season.
    Violation of these regulations is punishable by a fine or imprisonment, or both. A person found responsible for causing a wildfire as a result of violating these restrictions could also be charged for associated fire suppression costs.

    Discuss! Bad news for any trail clearing efforts.
    Please remember when you incur trail breakage to not break out your torch to repair your deraileur hanger.
    Discuss at your own risk. This thread may or may not be approved by xcghuy.

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    "Discuss at your own risk. This thread may or may not be approved by xcguy."

    Fixed it for ya. And I approve.
    Last edited by xcguy; 06-25-2012 at 05:30 AM.
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  3. #3
    Your bike is incorrigible
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    Can I still go up to Buff Creek to TIG weld some frames on the CO Trail?

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    The restrictions seem reasonable to me given the fire danger at hand.

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    Less meaningless drunken shooting

    Whats in season these days to blast away at anyway?

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    Does the "vehicle off road" restriction include motorcycles/dirt bikes? If so, good on us for using a non-motorized form of recreation

    I can almost guarantee that, despite the restrictions, some idiot will go ahead and set off some fireworks and start a blaze in the next couple of weeks.
    I drank the 29er koolaid- turns out it was POWERade

  7. #7
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    It's only June

    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour View Post
    The restrictions seem reasonable to me given the fire danger at hand.
    Absolutely. Until something changes with the weather that brings us more moisture, less heat and less wind, things are going to get worse and not better.

    In 2002 they closed national forests in New Mexico. It was being considered for the Pike/San Isabel. The Haymen Fire happened that year.

    In my memory, that year was no dryer or weirder than this one.

    There are only so many fires that can be managed going on at any one time. The Forest Service knows that they'll be held accountable if things spin totally out of control this year.

    I would not be surprised if one or more of the national forests in CO got closed at some point this summer. May seem unreasonable to keep people from mountain biking, but all it takes is a spark. A nice strong pedal strike can throw a spark.

    Pray for rain. And pray that some hillbilly doesn't shoot off a bottle rocket somewhere near your favorite national forest trail next week.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacksheepfocker View Post
    Less meaningless drunken shooting

    Whats in season these days to blast away at anyway?
    Some apparently thought propane tanks were open season.

    20 fires in Utah have been started by shooting this year.
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  9. #9
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    I wish the sherrif would be more vigilant with campfires. There were several open fires in O'be joyful campground last week. The signage is weak, and out of staters don't catch the fine print of local news and events.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Absolutely. Until something changes with the weather that brings us more moisture, less heat and less wind, things are going to get worse and not better.

    In 2002 they closed national forests in New Mexico. It was being considered for the Pike/San Isabel. The Haymen Fire happened that year.

    In my memory, that year was no dryer or weirder than this one.

    There are only so many fires that can be managed going on at any one time. The Forest Service knows that they'll be held accountable if things spin totally out of control this year.

    I would not be surprised if one or more of the national forests in CO got closed at some point this summer. May seem unreasonable to keep people from mountain biking, but all it takes is a spark. A nice strong pedal strike can throw a spark.

    Pray for rain. And pray that some hillbilly doesn't shoot off a bottle rocket somewhere near your favorite national forest trail next week.
    In 2002 it didn't snow down here all winter, it didn't rain in the spring. There was zero moisture down in the lower elevations for almost a year. Maybe it was the same up in the higher elevations. Farmers were saying how they'd plow down 4' and it was just dust.

    This year I remember knocking the heavy snow off the trees in my neighborhood multiple times this past winter. Maybe you didn't get much snow up higher but I've seen it drier down here before. Just a few months ago I did a hike with a group in the foothills and it rained on us for two hours straight. The difference this time is there's probably more deep down moisture so the trees aren't suffering so much. The grasses and bushes are all withering after all this dam heat.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  11. #11
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    Hmm.

    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    In 2002 it didn't snow down here all winter, it didn't rain in the spring. There was zero moisture down in the lower elevations for almost a year. Maybe it was the same up in the higher elevations. Farmers were saying how they'd plow down 4' and it was just dust.

    This year I remember knocking the heavy snow off the trees in my neighborhood multiple times this past winter. Maybe you didn't get much snow up higher but I've seen it drier down here before. Just a few months ago I did a hike with a group in the foothills and it rained on us for two hours straight. The difference this time is there's probably more deep down moisture so the trees aren't suffering so much. The grasses and bushes are all withering after all this dam heat.
    I'm not sure that this would be driven by a point-by-point comparison of inches of moisture. I kind of think that dry is dry. Further, in my memory, 2002 wasn't as hot and windy as this year is and has been so far. It's dry. 2002 was dry. It's a volatile situation, just as it was then. Dryer then? Maybe. Hotter and windier now? Maybe.

    I don't think those details matter as much as other factors. We have what 8-10 fires burning in CO right now? Doesn't really matter what the exact number is. There are many serious fires burning. Every fire location needs a command center and resources like people and tankers and trucks.

    In 2002 we had Hayman, and it was huge. But I don't recall there being this many separate fires.

    Once they get to the point where they have to pick and choose which fire they can actually throw resources at, they'll start making tough choices like closing national forests. If the moisture content in the timber in 2002 was 3% and this year it's 3.5%, but there are 15 or more serious fires burning, the number of fires burning might just be a little more important than the .5% of moisture.

    They were really wringing their hands over the idea of closing the forests back then. The local governments and tourism industry certainly did not want it. They won't want it this year. But things could reach crisis level with just a few more big fires.

    My $.02
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

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    Money is a resource too, High Park has already cost $25.5 million , and I think that is state money only so far.
    I don't think closures are a reality until root cause of other fires are determined, if unnatural there might be a little public support to close them down or implement super secret fire probation measures.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jujubeguntrider View Post
    Money is a resource too, High Park has already cost $25.5 million , and I think that is state money only so far.
    I don't think closures are a reality until root cause of other fires are determined, if unnatural there might be a little public support to close them down or implement double secret fire probation measures.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IndecentExposure View Post
    I wish the sherrif would be more vigilant with campfires. There were several open fires in O'be joyful campground last week. The signage is weak, and out of staters don't catch the fine print of local news and events.
    The cops were patrolling campgrounds up Slate this weekend.
    99% of the problems and questions posted here would be answered if people actually walked into a bicycle shop and asked

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtbRN View Post
    I can almost guarantee that, despite the restrictions, some idiot will go ahead and set off some fireworks and start a blaze in the next couple of weeks.
    Well having fireworks stands up and running isn't going to help out at all. I feel bad for the guy that is just trying to make a buck, but it is almost certain that someone out of state or out of touch will assume fireworks are legal since they are being sold. I say shut the stands down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo Jambo View Post
    I say shut the stands down.
    i concur

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    Waldo fire getting the big air tankers, because estimated $295 million loss if it burns down the nearby homes.
    Anybody see today's picture of New Mexico fire. The plume totally outdoes high parks. Caption claims 40,000 ft high plume.

    Link attached
    Pacheco Fire - 40000 Foot Echotop Smoke Column on 6/25 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

  18. #18
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    "We are seeing historic fire severity numbers,” said Scott Fitzwilliams, White River forest supervisor.

    Trees, shrubs and grasses are tinder-dry with moisture levels of 3 to 8 percent, soil moisture is at just 5 to 10 percent, air humidity is extremely low, and the region is experiencing repeated days of high winds, he said.

    “In a few weeks, we'll be putting 2002 far behind us in terms of fire risk,” Fitzwilliams said, referring to Colorado's previous record year for destructive wildfires and the last time Stage 2 restrictions were imposed in the region.

    “We will be at Stage 2 for the foreseeable future. But if we don't see a change in the weather conditions, we may be looking at Stage 3 restrictions,” Fitzwilliams said. Under Stage 3, public lands would be closed to everyone except firefighters and leaseholders."

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    More areas went stage 3 in New Mexico. No access-bummer, but they did of course mention that all the businesses in the area are still open. New Mexico doesn't get the same amount of tourism money CO does, I'd be surprised if we get this in the touristy forest areas. Just a bunch of stage 2 restrictions all over the place.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Absolutely. Until something changes with the weather that brings us more moisture, less heat and less wind, things are going to get worse and not better.

    In 2002 they closed national forests in New Mexico. It was being considered for the Pike/San Isabel. The Haymen Fire happened that year.

    In my memory, that year was no dryer or weirder than this one.

    There are only so many fires that can be managed going on at any one time. The Forest Service knows that they'll be held accountable if things spin totally out of control this year.

    I would not be surprised if one or more of the national forests in CO got closed at some point this summer. May seem unreasonable to keep people from mountain biking, but all it takes is a spark. A nice strong pedal strike can throw a spark.

    Pray for rain. And pray that some hillbilly doesn't shoot off a bottle rocket somewhere near your favorite national forest trail next week.
    They did close parts of the Pike/San Isabel that year. I remember the Guardsmen stationed at the tops of Boreas and Georgia Passes.

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