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  1. #1
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    Demo Day Etiquette

    Hi All,
    I've never attended a Demo Day but there are so many on the calendar this time of year, I thought I'd try some.

    But I'm not sure about Demo Day Etiquette (if there is such a thing).

    For example, how long should you keep the bike? Is it ok to ride it for an hour? Or do the demo day sponsors expect you to take a short 15 minute spin?

    BYOP? Bring your own pedals?

    Should I expect the sponsor to help me fit the bike and adjust sag? Or BYOP (bring your own pump)?

    Anything else I should know about borrowing someone else's expensive bike?

    Thanks for the insights.

  2. #2
    crash and burn at 45
    Reputation: drydirtrider's Avatar
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    Bring ID,
    Bring your Credit Card
    Bring your own pedals.
    Have a tube and pump in your pack.
    If you have your own shock pump in your pack it won't hurt.
    Most guys will help you set up your sag and let you do your own seat height.
    Show up when the event starts, most demo days are very busy.
    Be patient.
    Assuming you are going to White Ranch for the GBS demo, presume it to be busy.
    Don't be afraid to ask questions about propedal or technologies you might not be familiar with, these guys love talking about their bikes, don't be shy.
    I would ask about how long you could have the bike from whomever you are Demoing it from, they might only have one in that size or it might be super popular.
    The idea is to get a quick demo in to see if you are interested. If you want a full ride on a certain bike, I would pursue that after the Demo day.
    COMBA fan boy card holder #1.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocco1109
    Hi All,
    I've never attended a Demo Day but there are so many on the calendar this time of year, I thought I'd try some.

    But I'm not sure about Demo Day Etiquette (if there is such a thing).

    For example, how long should you keep the bike? Is it ok to ride it for an hour? Or do the demo day sponsors expect you to take a short 15 minute spin? Usually at least an hour on a local trail, sometimes longer.

    BYOP? Bring your own pedals? Yes, almost always required.

    Should I expect the sponsor to help me fit the bike and adjust sag? Or BYOP (bring your own pump)? Most companies like to set up the bike for you to avoid improper set up.

    Anything else I should know about borrowing someone else's expensive bike? Bring an ID & credit card, that's about it.


    Thanks for the insights.
    Demo's are pretty fun, depending on how well the bikes are built up. I have been to some where they have all mountain, 5-6" bikes set up with 90-100 stems, skinny tires & usually under forked

  4. #4
    Do it for FUN!
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    When I went to a Santa Cruz demo event, They carefully adjusted the suspension for me, and they were more than happy to adjust anything else on the bike the way I like it. I had them move the brake levers inwards, and the seat forwards. I think the whole point of a demo is to get a feel for the bike the way you would ride it, and I appreciated that the demo guys were willing to spend that extra 5 minutes getting it set up right. With that said, there were others waiting and so I made sure to be back within 15 minutes or so. And yes I ended up buying a Santa Cruz.

  5. #5
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    i was at my first demo day last weekend, Ibis demo at deer creek canyon. they would do anything i ask them to have me comfortable on the bike. any adjustment they could do in place. for me that was rotating shifters and lowering seat nose. they replaced stem for my friend for longer one too. they will do anything to make you happy. demoed hd. i flew. i could have it for hour. now i need to save.
    Last edited by brankulo; 05-11-2011 at 10:12 AM.

  6. #6
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    +1 on being patient. The guys setting up the bikes are answering questions from knowledgeable riders as well as complete newbies and they need to keep the show rolling, adjusting and talking at the same time.

    I've been to demos where we could have the bike for an hour if we wanted but also where there were a ton of riders waiting to go out so 15 minutes was appropriate. One Yeti demo was at Apex and I had 15 minutes. I had to motor up while still cold then bomb back down. I didn't learn much.

    I did a Turner demo in Moab (two of them) where the seatpost from my Superlight fit their new DW models. So I got to ride with my pedals and my saddle. Both demos were set up at Sovereign so a complete out and back was in order. Talk about a thorough demo. The owner of Turner, Dave, rode with us and man can that guy talk if you ask him a technical question.

    Later, guys rode demo bikes on The Whole Enchilada. Would that all demos be like that.
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  7. #7
    GUIDANCE COUNSELOR
    Reputation: NoahColorado's Avatar
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    +1 on bring tube and pump. Don't ever ride a flat, I'm amazed every year at Interbike how many d$#@heads I see riding on flats. Treat it like it's your bike!
    NOAH SEARS
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    TECH QUESTIONS HERE: INFO@MRPBIKE.COM

  8. #8
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    Demo Days

    Demo days - especially with factory reps present - are great! They give you a chance to ride several different bikes back-to-back on a real trail under the same conditions. That's way better than puttering around the block on a "test ride" at your local bike shop. But please be considerate of all the other folks wanting the same opportunity. I went to a demo day where there was a line waiting to check out a hot new product. The first rider took off down the trail and did not return for over four hours. He probably had a great ride (and hopefully bought the bike); but it was a bummer for everyone else who wasted half a day waiting for a turn on that rig.

  9. #9
    Rigid in Evergreen
    Reputation: topmounter's Avatar
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    Map out a good 15-30 minute loop from the Demo Days location and try to take out as many different bikes that interest you as possible. Once you're interested in spending a lot of time on a specific bike (or bikes), then go to the shop and do a 24-hour demo (or the "Demo Program" like what GBS does where you get 5 24-hour demo's and full credit towards a purchase).

  10. #10
    Loser
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    What happens if you crash and scratch the paint or something?

  11. #11
    I heart the drops
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoahColorado
    +1 on bring tube and pump. Don't ever ride a flat, I'm amazed every year at Interbike how many d$#@heads I see riding on flats. Treat it like it's your bike!
    Hahaha I was at the fox booth for a while and the had a tally of how many people where riding bikes with flat tires and it was about 50%
    "its not how slack your head angle is, its how you ride the bike"

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