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  1. #1
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    Cool product for those long rides.

    So I thought I would throw this out there as there seems to be plenty of people who like to get out on those long rides here in Colorado. I love to get out on those long all day rides and often solo. I already pack more than most do in there packs, but I am just one of those guys who is prepared for just about anything. At the end of the day there is only so much water I can carry or at least choose to carry. For a while now if I knew I was going to need to refill out in the middle of know where I would treat the water with iodine or just drink it. But that can take a while with the iodine and I would prefer to not get giardia again from untreated or filtered water. Once was enough. ( side note: I got giardia from buffalo creek last year on a hot day when I had a leak in my bladder and ran out of water. My old water filter is big and bulky so I always hated taking it. Being a gear nut I kept looking for something better. Well I think I did.

    I just recently came across what I think is a pretty sweet solution. FYI I have no connection to this product. I just think its cool and should share it.

    Its the Sawyer Squeeze™ Filter
    Sawyer® Products - Water Filtration, Insect Repellent, Sunscreens and More

    This thing is tiny and light weight. It fits in the palm of your hand and comes with a 3 different bag sizes for the trip and group size. The filter runs around $60, but I found mine on sale for $45.

    The way it works is that you fill one of the bags that the filter came with, with your choice of natures water, screw it onto the end of the filter, open the bite valve at the other end and start squeezing the bag. Out comes fresh water ready to drink, either straight from the bite valve or fill up your bottle or bladder. The flow is pretty good and now that I have used it a few times, probably faster than my old pump filter.

    Sawyer has a lifetime warranty on the filter and claims 3oz for the filter and bag less than an 1 oz. They also provide a syringe that you can use to back flush the filter for those times it gets clogged up a bit.

    This filter is great for its ease of use, and size. Its easy to just stuff in in a pack and forget about it.

    A few minor negatives about the filter. It can be a bit tricky to keep the dirty water from getting on the filter and down to you clean bottle. But just make sure the bag is wiped off a bit. The other difficulty I had has been trying to fill up a water bladder. I could use a few more hands. Its hard to hold the bag and filter, squeeze the bag and hold the bladder open to get the clean water. This is doing this solo of course. If you are with someone then one can hold the bladder and the other squeeze out the clean water.

    All in all though it's a great option for those days where you know you have water re-supply options but want to treat it. Think all of those stream crossings we cross and rivers and lakes we ride by. You can plan to carry less water as a result or just have an option for the what if's.

    Well enough rambling for this post.

    Image borrowed from the web.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cool product for those long rides.-sawyer_squeeze_water_filtration_system.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmoney View Post
    Image borrowed from the web.

  3. #3
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    No way due. I honestly thought this is a cool product that people on here might like to know about. If there is a more appropriate place to talk about product reviews like this that will actually get seen by people let me know and I will move it there. And yes I know about the accessories category under reviews, but I never think to look there. Actually now that I think about it. Your spamming spam.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmoney View Post
    ...My old water filter is big and bulky so I always hated taking it. Being a gear nut I kept looking for something better. Well I think I did.

    I just recently came across what I think is a pretty sweet solution. FYI I have no connection to this product. I just think its cool and should share it...
    Hmm, seems like it could be a pretty good deal. Just fold it up really small huh?

    I just got a steripen last season that I've only had occasion to use once. Kind of a leap of faith to believe that the UV light is going to work, but people out there have been using them successfully, even on water that doesn't have perfect clarity. The upside of some kind of filtering is of course that you don't have to drink the fine particulate from water that isn't perfectly clear--and the downside is that the floaters can clog the filter.

    Every time I've taken natures water, it's been from a very clean and clear source. I have a hard time with the idea of taking water from a mud puddle or some stream full of cow poop.

    But yeah, report back about how this works.

    KC, I've been known to bring along a can of SPAM (aka dog food for people), but I've never tried to filter water with it. That work pretty well? On it's own I don't think I'd call it a very effective water substitute.

    Oh, and OP, if you've had giardia I think that you pretty much have giardia and your body now has learned to deal with it. I think maybe you can drink water with the beaver fever in it without going there again. At least that's what I've heard.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Every time I've taken natures water, it's been from a very clean and clear source. I have a hard time with the idea of taking water from a mud puddle or some stream full of cow poop.
    I had my wake up call on my last Lost Creek backpacking trip. The creek was flowing great and looked crystal clear but just a ways up the trail a deer carcass was rotting right in the middle of the creek. It doesn't matter how clean you think that spring water is, you've got no idea what's upstream.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmoney View Post
    No way due. I honestly thought this is a cool product that people on here might like to know about. If there is a more appropriate place to talk about product reviews like this that will actually get seen by people let me know and I will move it there. And yes I know about the accessories category under reviews, but I never think to look there. Actually now that I think about it. Your spamming spam.
    Don't worry about that guy. He's just a grouchy old f**k with nothing better to do than troll the web.

  7. #7
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    Spam or not, I don't mind useful info. I lost my old Katadyne filter so I just got a steripen for this last trip. I haven't gotten sick yet from either system but this looks like a great idea too.

  8. #8
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    I must say that this looks like a pretty good product. I like how small it rolls up.

    I notice on the video that they have an adapter for drink tubes now. Now that got me thinking. Perhaps if you have a Camelbak with the quick change fitting, you can rig up an adapter so that you squeeze the water into your 'bak through the drink tube connector. That way you may not have to worry about dirty water.
    Last edited by TheNormsk; 06-12-2012 at 11:10 AM.

  9. #9
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    I am testing the Camelbak All Clear unit out. Sort of like an additional water bottle.

    Grams Light Bikes - Mountain Bike and Gear Reviews, and News: Camelbak - Interbike 2011

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmoney View Post
    Actually now that I think about it. Your spamming spam.
    reads: i know you are, but what am i?

    yes, there is a product review section in this website, little billy

  11. #11
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    It does look like a cool product, just maybe a bit aggravating to use solo. Back east we just carried a small bottle of bleach with us or Iodine and tried to find a clear running source of water.

    I forgot my water filter on my last high country ride this past weekend but I did have MSR's Sweetwater Drops (chlorine based) and used those to treat clear flowing water from Keystone Gulch. 4 of us pulled at least 3 liters of water each and did just fine.

  12. #12
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    heavy metals from mine ruins too

    Quote Originally Posted by Liquidmantis View Post
    I had my wake up call on my last Lost Creek backpacking trip. The creek was flowing great and looked crystal clear but just a ways up the trail a deer carcass was rotting right in the middle of the creek. It doesn't matter how clean you think that spring water is, you've got no idea what's upstream.
    Yep.

    That sounds really disgusting by the way. Ick.

    One thing that gives me concern especially around here in the upper Arkansas is mine runoff. For example, Chalk Creek is beautiful and clear, but if you go up to the Hancock/Romney area near the Alpine Tunnel you'll see that there is lots of heavy metal-laden water draining out of told mines up there. Near Romney there's a big EPA superfund cleanup site. Above that at the Hancock townsite there's water that smells nasty, almost like paint or something. Sure, EPA is cleaning lots of the cadmium and arsenic and stuff out of the water, but certainly not all of it. Filters ain't gonna get that dissolved mineral content.

    No way really to know about that unless you already know the area.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaingoatepics View Post
    It does look like a cool product, just maybe a bit aggravating to use solo. Back east we just carried a small bottle of bleach with us or Iodine and tried to find a clear running source of water.

    I forgot my water filter on my last high country ride this past weekend but I did have MSR's Sweetwater Drops (chlorine based) and used those to treat clear flowing water from Keystone Gulch. 4 of us pulled at least 3 liters of water each and did just fine.
    "Symptoms usually begin 1 to 2 weeks (average 7 days) after an individual becomes infected."

    Let us know *next* week if you skated.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Yep.

    That sounds really disgusting by the way. Ick.

    One thing that gives me concern especially around here in the upper Arkansas is mine runoff. For example, Chalk Creek is beautiful and clear, but if you go up to the Hancock/Romney area near the Alpine Tunnel you'll see that there is lots of heavy metal-laden water draining out of told mines up there. Near Romney there's a big EPA superfund cleanup site. Above that at the Hancock townsite there's water that smells nasty, almost like paint or something. Sure, EPA is cleaning lots of the cadmium and arsenic and stuff out of the water, but certainly not all of it. Filters ain't gonna get that dissolved mineral content.

    No way really to know about that unless you already know the area.
    The solution to pollution is dilution.


  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post

    One thing that gives me concern especially around here in the upper Arkansas is mine runoff. For example, Chalk Creek is beautiful and clear, but if you go up to the Hancock/Romney area near the Alpine Tunnel you'll see that there is lots of heavy metal-laden water draining out of told mines up there. Near Romney there's a big EPA superfund cleanup site. Above that at the Hancock townsite there's water that smells nasty, almost like paint or something. Sure, EPA is cleaning lots of the cadmium and arsenic and stuff out of the water, but certainly not all of it. Filters ain't gonna get that dissolved mineral content.

    No way really to know about that unless you already know the area.

    Yeah, that's what I've always been more worried about here.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    The solution to pollution is dilution.

    Yeah, by the time it flows into the main stem of the Arkansas (and mixes in with all the pristine superfund-treated water flowing out of the Leadville mining districts) it's reasonably diluted. But is there enough clean water mixing into dinky little Chalk Creek to really dilute it adequately?

    The mine runoff has certainly been diluted compared to 30 years ago. What I heard is that you never could catch a trout out of the Arkansas that was more than about 7" before the superfund work happened upstream of here, because the heavy metals in the water would concentrate in the fish's liver and kill it before it got more than a few years old. We have nice 20"+ wild browns in the Arkansas main stem now.

    I hesitate to take water out of a creek that's below a mining district. Call me kooky.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Yeah, by the time it flows into the main stem of the Arkansas (and mixes in with all the pristine superfund-treated water flowing out of the Leadville mining districts) it's reasonably diluted. But is there enough clean water mixing into dinky little Chalk Creek to really dilute it adequately?
    Depends.

    I hesitate to take water out of a creek that's below a mining district. Call me kooky.
    I'd say it's pretty wise.

    But it's all relative, right? Drinking contaminated water is definitely preferable to dying of dehydration.

  18. #18
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    Yeah, I've looked into the Steripen. I have a few friends with them. They use them for their long distance trail runs. I like the idea but I know they have also had some reliability issues with theirs. I know some people love them and others don't. I do like how small and light they are though.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Hmm, seems like it could be a pretty good deal. Just fold it up really small huh?

    I just got a steripen last season that I've only had occasion to use once. Kind of a leap of faith to believe that the UV light is going to work, but people out there have been using them successfully, even on water that doesn't have perfect clarity. The upside of some kind of filtering is of course that you don't have to drink the fine particulate from water that isn't perfectly clear--and the downside is that the floaters can clog the filter.

    Every time I've taken natures water, it's been from a very clean and clear source. I have a hard time with the idea of taking water from a mud puddle or some stream full of cow poop.

    But yeah, report back about how this works.

    KC, I've been known to bring along a can of SPAM (aka dog food for people), but I've never tried to filter water with it. That work pretty well? On it's own I don't think I'd call it a very effective water substitute.

    Oh, and OP, if you've had giardia I think that you pretty much have giardia and your body now has learned to deal with it. I think maybe you can drink water with the beaver fever in it without going there again. At least that's what I've heard.
    That does look like an interesting product. I've tried just about everything and currently use chlorine dioxide or my steripen. I haven't had issues with either.

    I have also had Giardia. It sucked hugely and actually affected me for months. I have no clue if I have immunity or anything after getting Giardia. I'm not going to try to find out!
    baker

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    But it's all relative, right? Drinking contaminated water is definitely preferable to dying of dehydration.
    Totally. I'll go face-down in a mud puddle full of manure without any treatment at all if I'm thinking I'll die otherwise. If you live you can always treat the contamination illness. If you don't, well, game over.

    My brother-in-law is a professor who's done a ton of field work in Africa, and spent long spells of time in the Frank Church Wilderness Area up in Idaho. His contention is, just drink out of streams if they seem clean. Let your body learn how to deal with the nastys. He says that in the US, none of it will kill you.

    Personally, I'm into taking precautions and being picky about even the water I treat and then drink. But his way works for him.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Totally. I'll go face-down in a mud puddle full of manure without any treatment at all if I'm thinking I'll die otherwise. If you live you can always treat the contamination illness. If you don't, well, game over.
    Yeah, this was how I got Giardia. I took a calculated risk when lost, dehydrated, and solo in the backcountry. Giardia was a better choice than dying of hypothermia...
    baker

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    "Symptoms usually begin 1 to 2 weeks (average 7 days) after an individual becomes infected."

    Let us know *next* week if you skated.

    tic tic tic tic tic tic tic >>>>>>>>>>>>>

  23. #23
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    If I'm on a really long ride I'm unlikely to be alone. And if that's the case, I'll just make the other sucker carry the filter.

  24. #24
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    Yeah Giardia is no fun. I was out for a good six weeks. The storm hit about 8 days after I had a small bottle of untreated water. I've done it before, but was unlucky this time. It is a good weight loss and body cleansing method for those interested.

  25. #25
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    Here is some info. on acid water mine drainage (and natural areas of acid water): acid water drainage - CGS

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