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  1. #1
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    chamois vs softer saddle, thoughts?

    I ride a pretty hard saddle making chamois a need more then a preference. Problem is I ride a lot and the chamois get pretty wretched by the 3rd ride so I have to wash them all the time, plus if I want to grab an after ride beer or two, my boys are forced to sweat it out in the amazon for a few hours before I can change (my girl also dosent appreciate a hint of nutsweat in the air before they get washed).

    So my question is, could the need for chamios be eliminated by a softer saddle? Not sure if there is a performance related reason for the need for chamios?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tj.steady
    I ride a pretty hard saddle making chamois a need more then a preference. Problem is I ride a lot and the chamois get pretty wretched by the 3rd ride so I have to wash them all the time, plus if I want to grab an after ride beer or two, my boys are forced to sweat it out in the amazon for a few hours before I can change (my girl also dosent appreciate a hint of nutsweat in the air before they get washed).

    So my question is, could the need for chamios be eliminated by a softer saddle? Not sure if there is a performance related reason for the need for chamios?
    Wow! First off TMI [Too much information] try to keep some of that to a minimum and to yourself next time. As far as a chamois vs. a softer seat I say do both. Get a gel seat and use a padded chamois and your boys and girlfriend should be a happier group.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  3. #3
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    Chamios are manly there to prevent chaffing, whereas a seat is for cushon.

  4. #4
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    Terry Fly... the cutout will keep your boys aired out as well as lighten the load on your soft tissue

  5. #5
    Your retarded
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    Try washing your riding shorts after every ride to avoid ball stench. That should be a logical choice.
    A trail thatís too difficult wouldnít exist because itíd never be used. But, trails can exist thatíre too difficult for you.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickle
    Try washing your riding shorts after every ride to avoid ball stench. That should be a logical choice.
    Along with a daily shower might not be a bad idea. I bet you go through quite a few girlfriends.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  7. #7
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    I wear spandex underneath my boardshorts for rides, but I'll never admit it in person.

    Use the suicide doors on the Tundra for cover (or duck behind a tree) and lose the spandex prior to beers.

    Works everytime.

    +1 on the laundry idea
    Last edited by WKD-RDR; 07-25-2008 at 04:08 PM.
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  8. #8
    feel the Force
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    Softer saddles don't necessarily mean more comfort. Padding tends to squish where you don't want it to. Get a saddle that provides good support for your sitbones, and no pressure up front. Then utilize a good chamois to give a little cushion, prevent chafing, and wick moisture away. AND wash frequently.
    A punctured bicycle
    on a hillside desolate,
    will nature make a man of me yet...
    -Morrissey

  9. #9
    enlightened.
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    buy more lycra.

  10. #10
    pdh
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    Wash your shorts after every ride. Don't put them in the dryer. Don't sit in them after riding,
    you'll get fungus
    I JUST WANT A BICYCLE!!!!! " Why-why are you yelling at me?"
    WHATEVER, MAKE ME A BICYCLE CLOWN!!!!!!!!!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tj.steady
    I ride a pretty hard saddle making chamois a need more then a preference. Problem is I ride a lot and the chamois get pretty wretched by the 3rd ride so I have to wash them all the time, plus if I want to grab an after ride beer or two, my boys are forced to sweat it out in the amazon for a few hours before I can change (my girl also dosent appreciate a hint of nutsweat in the air before they get washed).

    So my question is, could the need for chamios be eliminated by a softer saddle? Not sure if there is a performance related reason for the need for chamios?
    Umm...change before the post ride brews. Wash the clothes upon the return home.

  12. #12
    skillz to pay billz
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    +1 on doing laundry

  13. #13
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    Maybe some of this!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Inflexable...
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    Man, after one ride I don't even want to pick them up let alone put them on again...
    Tact is for people not witty enough to be sarcastic...

  15. #15
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    You'd better wash those damn things after every ride unless you want some nice jock itch or saddle sores. The chamois is often some form of sponge like material which I'm sure is a great place if you're some form of bacteria with all the heat and moisture. Barf!

    The primary function of a chamois is to help alleviate chaffing. There are multiple designs/theories on chamois but generally speaking, in regards to spandex/chamois since that's all I wear, you get what you pay for in terms of longevity and comfort. I wash mine on the handwash setting and hang dry. No need for chamois cream since they're all synthetic.

    I ride a hard tail and have gone through a couple bike fits so I'm comfortable with my saddle position and width (an often neglected aspect of saddle choice). I ride a San Marco Aspide which would make most of you sissy all-mountain types cringe but since it fits properlly, I don't have any issues.

  16. #16
    Rolling
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    Chafe your ass on long rides hard till it forms callouses.


    That is the best solution.

  17. #17
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    Brooks Saddles?

    Has anybody tried a Brooks B-17 (or similar) saddle?

    Will it save your perineum (a.k.a. 'taint', 'choda') like a 'wedge' saddle? Is it too slick?

    Just curious.

    I've searched other forums and it sounds like you either love 'em or hate 'em, especially for trail riding.

  18. #18
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    Hey tj.steady - a few constructive words, mostly re-emphasizing points already made. I worked for Pearl Izumi for 7 years and learned a lot about takin' care o' your junk.

    -definitely wear a chamois. A well made chamois is there to stick to your skin and move with it to prevent chafing. Use a chamois cream also if you need.

    -definitely get a few more pair of shorts. It'll be one of the best cycling investments you've ever made. Just like saddles are personal preference and some work better than others, so will chamois. Once you find one you like, stick with it. All chamois are not created equal.

    -it's not necessary, but try to get a chamois that has an anti-bacterial treatment. And wash it after every ride. Don't re-use a chamois prior to washing. It's gross, won't function as well, and the thing will get stanky and fester. You don't want that touchin' your junk.

    -chamois care - wash on gentle and use a soap with no additives. Also, it's ok to put in the dryer on gentle, too. The low heat helps reset the "heat treating" in the synthetic fibers of your shorts. Just don't fry 'em and you'll be fine. Don't use fabric softener, either. Woolite is bad, too. It will kill lycra.
    Redstone Cyclery
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  19. #19
    Human Crayon
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    I wear them under my normal shorts as well...they are dual purpose to me: padding & keeping my boys from getting mashed between my arse and the saddle. It has happened once and never again....ever.
    ..:: sleestak ::..
    [SIZE] Matters [/SIZE]

  20. #20
    Ride Everything
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    Condition your nether regions with one of these:
    GRAVELBIKE.COM - ride everything

  21. #21
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    Whether you wear a chamois in lycra or baggies, or wear a chamois at all, you definitely need to wash your shorts after every ride, and since you ride often, you need to buy more shorts to have on hand to rotate between rides/washes.

    As mentioned in the thread, air dry your shorts after washing. The dry Front Range air, especially these days of hot, lets your shorts dry in no time especially as the fabric they're made of is designed to wick and evaporate moisture fast.

    Try to make it a part of your get-home ritual to just get your clothes, socks, gloves, etc., into the wash as soon as you walk in the door.

  22. #22
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    There may be a FUNGUSAMONGGUS!!!!




    Ringworm
    We are not alone.


    Every day, people around the world, from every walk of life, experience visitations by alien life forms. These silent invaders use our skin as landing sites, burrowing and spreading, as if they were exploring some strange new world. The only evidence of their arrival: a red, scaly, O-shaped lesion, like the rings of Saturn.

    Those lesions are the telltale signs of ringworm--which is not a worm but a group of fungi identical to the kinds that cause athlete's foot and jock itch. Invading the warm, moist areas of the groin, trunk, extremities and scalp, the fungi multiply to form a pronounced red ring or an itchy, eczema-like patch.

    Ringworm is highly contagious. If your skin comes in contact with the fungi anywhere, parts of your hide may begin to display the telltale circular design. Bathrooms, gym lockers, theater seats, combs, pets and unwashed clothing have all served as launching pads for a nasty bout with ringworm.

    Severe cases, specifically those of the scalp, can be treated only with prescribed oral antibiotics. But with milder cases, you have more down-to-earth weapons at your disposal to fight off this invasion of the body splotchers.

    Cream it with an antifungal. "You can stop most ringworm infections of the trunk, groin or extremities with an over-the-counter antifungal cream," says Jack L. Lesher, Jr., M.D., associate professor of dermatology at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. "Go with a cream that contains an -azole product as its active ingredient. Clotrimazoles (Lotrimin AF, Mycelex) and miconazoles (Micatin, Monistat) do a great job of controlling ringworm fungi quickly."

    "You may also see good results with a product containing a tolnaftate, such as Tinactin or Aftate," says dermatologist Joseph Bark, M.D., past chairman of the Department of Dermatology at St. Joseph's Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. "These will cool down a ringworm infection, reduce the itching and limit the spread. They're more effective on smaller patches than on large ones."

    For directions for application, check the package. You will need to apply any medication twice a day for about two weeks after the ring disappears to take care of any stubborn fungi that may be hiding.
    Quote:From the Rodale book, The Doctors Book of Home Remedies II
    Front Range, Colorado.

  23. #23
    holding back the darkness
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    Ok.... So this type of thread has popped up a couple time lately. Where in god's name are people getting the notion that it would be ok to NOT wash their shorts between use? I mean that with no intended disrespect to the OP, but I am getting legitimately curious now. I really can't think of any other garment that I'd be okay with recycling after several hours of direct contact with sweaty ass on a regular basis.
    Can there really be a question here? Direct contact. Sweaty ass. Several hours.

    Chamois is a super-important piece of riding gear (think helmet, gloves, shoes..) that is often over-looked or trivialized. To the contrary, a high-quality chamois in good condition (read: clean) can make a significant difference in comfort; which translates into decreased perception of fatigue, increased perception of fun, and cuts way back on the fumunda cheese.
    **** censorship

  24. #24
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  25. #25
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    Damn, looks like Marvin beat me to my invention.
    A Diaper Epic
    Last edited by DIRTJUNKIE; 07-27-2008 at 03:47 PM.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  26. #26
    Oh, So Interesting!
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    I'll get saddle sores unless everything is perfectly clean, and theres a lot to be said for keeping that particular region of your body clean, including shorts. If I'll be pedaling a lot, I use a little bit of neosporin, then a little bit of chamois cream in the areas that are most likely to chafe. This helps a lot with comfort and keeping saddle sores away. I used to use PI ultrasensors under nylon shorts, but those wore out and I use whatever Oakley puts in their baggies, seems to works fine.
    .




    Strava: turn off your dork logger when you're not on sanctioned trails.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by subliminalshiver
    Ok.... So this type of thread has popped up a couple time lately. Where in god's name are people getting the notion that it would be ok to NOT wash their shorts between use? I mean that with no intended disrespect to the OP, but I am getting legitimately curious now. I really can't think of any other garment that I'd be okay with recycling after several hours of direct contact with sweaty ass on a regular basis.
    Can there really be a question here? Direct contact. Sweaty ass. Several hours.

    Chamois is a super-important piece of riding gear (think helmet, gloves, shoes..) that is often over-looked or trivialized. To the contrary, a high-quality chamois in good condition (read: clean) can make a significant difference in comfort; which translates into decreased perception of fatigue, increased perception of fun, and cuts way back on the fumunda cheese.
    Funny f*ckin' post and couldn't agree more. At least hand wash the shorts and air dry them for the next day.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnboi68
    Has anybody tried a Brooks B-17 (or similar) saddle?

    Will it save your perineum (a.k.a. 'taint', 'choda') like a 'wedge' saddle? Is it too slick?

    Just curious.

    I've searched other forums and it sounds like you either love 'em or hate 'em, especially for trail riding.
    I've only used a B-17 for the past 4 years now, will it help your taint??...NO...But it will look phueken gnar on your SS!!
    Black Sheep...where it'ss at!!
    "I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays." LA

  29. #29
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    This forum is like the family I never had -- constructive and supportive and best of all, wacky and funny, too!

    I wash my shorts by hand. Most washers and especially dryers just slowly abrade your clothes.
    I ruined my favorite pairs of Pearlizumi's and Sugoi shorts, slowly over about a year -- the stitching around the pad just got thinner and thinner. I thought it was just all the miles.
    Wrong!
    Now, I was all of my shorts - esp. my new DeMarchi's, which have the BEST pad EVER! - by hand and hang to dry.
    As to a saddle, yes, support over soft. I had a Fly -- the cutout would close up due to it being too soft.
    Look at those TDF riders -- no spongy saddles in the peloton!

    Best advice I ever got was to have 2 or 3 pairs of good shorts -- that way, you will always have a fresh clean pair in the on-deck circle.

    And so sorry to hear about the Ringworm(?)

    Now, if you'll excuse me I think I need to go wash my shorts. I washed them last night, but after that ringworm story, well........

    Happy Trails!

  30. #30
    skillz to pay billz
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    lately I've only bought shorts with removable liner/chamois. that way if really need to recycle the shorts I can still use a clean mesh or lycra chamois. Also makes it easy to put on long overlayers inside the shorts in the winter

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by lokiboy8
    I wash my shorts by hand. Most washers and especially dryers just slowly abrade your clothes.
    Front-load washing machines mitigate the damage done to laundry.

  32. #32
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Wash shorts on delicate cycle & line/air dry. I have two pairs of Pearl Izumi shorts that have lasted 10 years and are still in *decent* shape.

  33. #33
    miked_co
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    First off, a lot of you are assuming that the original poster has a washing machine at his or her house, not everyone does.

    For those that dont have a washing machine at home this means either buying lots of pairs of bike shorts, at $50 a pop not likely since you cant even afford a place with washer/dryer or hand-washing bike shorts after every ride.

    My solution since I dont have a washer/dryer but do ride upwards of 3 or 4 days per week (the best things in life are free) is to wear 3 layers: underwear, chamois, then bike shorts, getting a couple uses out of the bike shorts/chamois between washes. This is not as comfortable and can be hot but it beats handwashing or owning 12 pairs of bike shorts.

    Ive never had any problems with chafing and would rather use a comfy bike seat with regular shorts with no chamois. I dont see why saddles can't be more firm in some areas (ie near the cutout) and soft in other areas. Surely, someone has found a comfortable seat that can be used without chamois?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by miked_co
    First off, a lot of you are assuming that the original poster has a washing machine at his or her house, not everyone does.

    For those that dont have a washing machine at home this means either buying lots of pairs of bike shorts, at $50 a pop not likely since you cant even afford a place with washer/dryer or hand-washing bike shorts after every ride.

    My solution since I dont have a washer/dryer but do ride upwards of 3 or 4 days per week (the best things in life are free) is to wear 3 layers: underwear, chamois, then bike shorts, getting a couple uses out of the bike shorts/chamois between washes. This is not as comfortable and can be hot but it beats handwashing or owning 12 pairs of bike shorts.

    Ive never had any problems with chafing and would rather use a comfy bike seat with regular shorts with no chamois. I dont see why saddles can't be more firm in some areas (ie near the cutout) and soft in other areas. Surely, someone has found a comfortable seat that can be used without chamois?
    I agree:
    (the best things in life are free)
    I find if you do a long ride and your shorts are funky at the end.
    Immediately do the exact same ride backwards and you end up with clean
    shorts.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  35. #35
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    Wow! Thanks for the tips. Should have specified that I use the same technique Miked_CO (above) uses. None the less, I have decided to bite the bullet and am now washing frequently. Sometimes you just need an intervention. I trust my nuts are now in good hands thanks to this forum.

  36. #36
    skillz to pay billz
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    who's got your back?

    front range got your back.

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