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  1. #1
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    Bike Shop Frustration

    Advice appreciated. Anything I can do, beside wait and be frustrated?

    I bought a bike from a (popular, reputable) Boulder bike shop four months ago. I paid $2000. Two days later I was back at the shop because after riding I realized the chain was 2+ links too long, also the brakes were rubbing. Wait a day. A week later I'm back again, this time so they can check into the horrific creak. Took them a couple days but they found it. Except on my next ride it was louder than ever. Another two days at the shop.

    Repeat that patten a couple times - them fixing things that I don't think should be problems on a brand new bike. I asked them many times "I just bought this here, can you please check it over and dial it in." That never seemed to take - I had to discover this stuff on the trails.

    Two weeks ago the rear hub went out. Fun walk to the parking lot. Shop took a week to get the part and have the bike ready.

    Two days ago, after a ride, I notice there's a lot of play in a pivot in the rear suspension. I brought it by for what I hoped would be a quick tighten and learned they need a bearing for the pivot. They'll call the bike co. on Monday, wait on delivery, and I'm depressed again on a beautiful Saturday. They're unapologetic.

    Am I just unlucky? Should the shop be taking better care of me? ie, are these week long waits usual? Should I ask for a loaner bike?

  2. #2
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    I'm not saying the things you mentioned didn't happen it's just that I've never heard of so many things happening to a "new" bike in such a short amount of time. Not to be patronizing, here, but are you sure what you perceive to be problems are indeed problems? A creak here a creak there, sheeit, my bike has a ton of creaks.

    Hubs going out in two weeks? I've never had a hub go out, ever. Pivots needing replacing in two weeks? I've never had a pivot that needed replacing.

    What I'm saying here is maybe your perception of what is "wrong" is wrong. I build houses and I've had non-mechanical type clients have some vague feeling about something and tell me to "fix it". When I ask what it is they want fixed they get flustered and blurt out "I don't know, just fix it". See what I'm saying?

    Maybe the bike shop is as amazed as you at your run of "bad luck" or they may rue the day they sold you this bike because now they know you'll be back every few days with some new problem that "needs to be fixed". I'm just throwing this out to maybe help you see things in a different light. Heck, I could be wrong!
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

  3. #3
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    Fair enough. But I don't think that's the case. Believe me, there's no mistaking a busted rear hub - it went while I was pulling up a rock at White Ranch. Replaced by warranty. Same for the pivot bearing - certainly unrideable, and hopefully covered by warranty. The creaking was seriously horrific, and certainly not something anybody should put up with in a brand new bike (that was the first or second week I had it).

  4. #4
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    Don't blame the bike shop. I know it's a new bike and all, but it's getting used and stuff happens. Is the shop giving you attitude every time you bring the bike in? Sounds like they're doing a pretty good on the customer service end, doing the little adjustments and warrantying the broken stuff. It's not they're fault the parts are junking out on you.

  5. #5
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    If you paid $2k, chances are your bike was preassembled, put in the box then shipped to the shop. A shop mechnic pulled it out of the box and slapped it together, probably in a timely enough fashion to get right on to the next bike. The brakes rubbed, but were "good enough." The chain was a couple of links to long because that's what the assembly factory did before they put it on the box. The brakes should've been perfect, but the chain thing isn't really that big of a deal.

    The hub and the pivot bearing sound like they are more than likely excusible warranty claims. Those things just happen. Sucky that you got a double whammy on it, though. A creek 4 months down the road is par for the cours on a mountain bike, but the bike shouldn't be creaking after only a couple of rides. Creaks and brake rubs are something that shouldn't take more than a day or two tops regardless of how busy the shop is. That stuff is quick and easy to fix usually. When you need extra parts, though, the wait times are acceptable. No shop can stock every part for every bike. You're looking at a 3-4 day shipping time to get the part plus a day or two to get the fix done depending on how busy the shop is.

    Sounds like you've had a bit of bad luck and some not over the top great service. I'd ask for a loaner bike, what the heck. It never hurts to ask. I wouldn't be upset if they say no, though. That would be an example of over the top great service, but wouldn't be expected.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by offtherack
    Advice appreciated. Anything I can do, beside wait and be frustrated?

    Am I just unlucky? Should the shop be taking better care of me? ie, are these week long waits usual? Should I ask for a loaner bike?
    If your complaints are all legit then I say by all means you should ask for a loaner bike. I busted a wheel once and a local shop was building me a new wheel and there were some delays in shipping for the new hub so the shop owner let me borrow a wheel from him so I could get a ride in that week, if they have some rentals or demos laying around it shouldn't be that big of a deal to hook you up in my opinion. besides it can't hurt to ask
    2007'ish Heckler and 2006 Chameleon
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  7. #7
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    dont feel singled out your just having shitluck. it happens and its no fun. its the worst when you have to wait longer for a part then you expected and then it gets to you damaged or incorrect and you have to start over.
    bike builder that day must have been having a rough/hungover/too stoned...or all of the above day and overlooked a few things and thats upsetting but new bikes need to break in. are they charging you any labor for these visits?

  8. #8
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    Should have gotten a hard tail.

  9. #9
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    No good Customer Service is Dead

    The fact that you bought a bike from this shop and they "remain unapologetic" speaks volumes about the shop. Also, the fact that they are not preemptively offering you a loaner says alot as well. The shop is really out of line. That you are not naming which shop is dropping the ball shows some patience and class on your part but I think that it is time for you to explain to them that they owe you a loaner bike so you can get out and ride. Good luck with your conversation with the bike shop owner.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdw0123
    The fact that you bought a bike from this shop and they "remain unapologetic" speaks volumes about the shop. Also, the fact that they are not preemptively offering you a loaner says alot as well. The shop is really out of line. That you are not naming which shop is dropping the ball shows some patience and class on your part but I think that it is time for you to explain to them that they owe you a loaner bike so you can get out and ride. Good luck with your conversation with the bike shop owner.
    If the problems are manufacturing defects i fall to see how the shop owes him any thing. When i worked for a shop we only gave out a loaner when we screwed something up.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser
    If the problems are manufacturing defects i fall to see how the shop owes him any thing. When i worked for a shop we only gave out a loaner when we screwed something up.
    Really? No responsibility? My local shop offered me a loaner bike for a warranty issue and I didn't even buy the bike from them. That equates to me being a customer for life.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitek79
    Really? No responsibility? My local shop offered me a loaner bike for a warranty issue and I didn't even buy the bike from them. That equates to me being a customer for life.

    Good for you but don't expect that from every shop. My point is if the shop doesn't have demos to offer then what are that supposed to do pull a brand new bike off the rack and give it to you just because your bike is broken threw no fault of theirs? I think people just expect way too much from bike shops when they are just trying to make ends meet. Its also why i have more then one bike to ride. But i also never need any one to service my bikes.

  13. #13
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    And that's exactly why shops are *****ing about people buying from the internet. If you aren't going to get anything "extra", why pay the extra money?

  14. #14
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    Moral of the story. if you want a good bike. pay the extra money.

    If your gonna go cheap your gonna get cheap.

  15. #15
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    Is 2 grand considered cheap?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowskilz
    Moral of the story. if you want a good bike. pay the extra money.

    If your gonna go cheap your gonna get cheap.

    No moral of the story is if you want it fixed right do it yourself.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitek79
    Is 2 grand considered cheap?
    In this situation yes. 2 grand for some bikes is super expensive. 2 grand for others is a drop in the bucket. My fork and cranks retail for what he bought his bike for. In mtn biking you pay for what you get. plain and simple. The hub was prolly some off the shelf taiwanese that was never checked by a person. The bike was preassembled by ppl who dont care.

    Plain and simple you get what you pay for!

  18. #18
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    Maybe he should tell us what kind of bike it is.

  19. #19
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    for what its worth

    It appears your riding a spec. I had a similar issue about 4 yrs ago on my 05? stumpjumper fsr rear hub went out relatively soon, and the bolt broke off inside the mounting tab. for the shock. I went back and forth with the shop and after they had it for a week they told me it couldn't be fixed. I was pretty upset after spending that kind of money. This was a week before a moab trip so they hooked me up with a free loaner. Actually on the way home the Specialized rep called me and said they were going to replace the frame after two of my friends had similar issues. Long story short they upgraded the frame, converted my 80mm fork to 100mm. complete bike build, new seat post, new front derailleur and i was only charged for some new cable housing. They did lose my computer but no big deal.

    I had better luck going directly through the specialized rep but the shop also went above and beyond with all they did as well. I will mention it was wheat ridge cyclery. Too bad that bike hasn't been ridden but twice in the last three yrs.!

    Good luck!
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  20. #20
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    A. If you're off you bike for a weekend on a $2k bike that you bought 4 months ago, you should get a loaner to go rip around on. It's Saturday in June, everyone should be riding

    B. Stuff does break, and sometimes by coincidence on the same bike more than one thing goes wrong. But if you are having several things go wrong at once, let a manager know. They should go the extra mile. Like pulling a bearing off a instock bike to get you going. Most shops will do this, if you ask (some even if you don't)

    Sorry to hear about your experience. $2k is a good bit of money, so I'm sure you got a fine bike, and will have a fun time ripping it up once you get through this.

    In the meantime, grab a loaner and go find some singletrack. The trails are extra tacky right now.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ignazjr
    If you paid $2k, chances are your bike was preassembled, put in the box then shipped to the shop. A shop mechnic pulled it out of the box and slapped it together, probably in a timely enough fashion to get right on to the next bike. The brakes rubbed, but were "good enough." The chain was a couple of links to long because that's what the assembly factory did before they put it on the box. The brakes should've been perfect, but the chain thing isn't really that big of a deal.
    This was pretty much my assumption. I wish they would have spent another five minutes with it. Heck, take it around the block once. It would have saved me a few visits.

    Of course I don't blame the shop for the hub, or now the pivot bearing (although they did report the creaking issue was finally solved in one of the pivots, so they had been in there). It just compounds my frustration after the initial carelessness, and they haven't been supportive. I wish they'd stand behind the merchandise they sold me a little more. It wouldn't take much. Heck, just lie to me - tell you me you called around and couldn't get the part quicker. Instead it's a one minute look and "we'll have to call the bike company monday, let me get your name and number".

    They haven't charged me for any of the warranty service, and I wouldn't say they've cheated me at all.

    They're fast food, I now realize. Wish I could go back and patronize a different bike shop.

  22. #22
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    The shop did sell him the bike and should stand behind the quality of the product or represent a different brand. They sold a lemon. Even if they can not rectify the situation by loaning a bike, can't they at least apologize for the inconvenience? A big part of customer service is support after the sale. They will just lose repeat business without it.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBR me!
    It appears your riding a spec. I had a similar issue about 4 yrs ago on my 05? stumpjumper fsr rear hub went out relatively soon
    Yeah, the cheaper stumpjumper's have never been known for their great wheelsets, I see. I do love the way it rides. But having two part failures inside of four months might put me off Spec for a while (the rear hub is shimano). I went eight years on a 2000 stumpy hardtail, too. (Did replace the wheels early on.)

  24. #24
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    offtherack, what shop and what bike are you dealing with? If you're having this much trouble, that deserves to be advertised so at a minimum other riders can be aware of it during their decision making process.

    Different angle here.....I have friend who is constantly running into problems with his bikes. He'll never admit it, however, it's clearly due to his lack of riding skills and his weight. He shifts way too late with the drive train under a ton of torque. He is not able to finesse through rough terrain. He crashes and just generally needs to improve his technique. You be the judge of if any of this applies, I'm not saying it does. Just an angle to consider. But I would definite let the mtbr community know what shop and bike you're dealing with.

    Msurk

  25. #25
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    Warranty issues not included, I won't let anyone else work on my bike. It takes a fairly minimal investment in tools and isn't very difficult. When I buy a bike I hope to never bring it back to the shop. Learning to do maintnence and adjustments saves a lot of time and hassle. Some of the things people leave their bike in a shop for take 5 min. to fix or adjust.

    That said, it sounds like you got a lemon and I'd ask for a loaner or credit toward a different bike. The shop has to be responsible for what they sell, it's what you're paying them for.
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  26. #26
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    Sounds like you and I should go bowling!!

    I bought a stumpjumper last spring from the wal-mart of bike shops and had terrible luck. They always treated me really nice and they did not give me that condescending F%$! You with a smile that some other shops love to do. My Fox Talas crapped out after 3 months of riding. I took it to them to be fixed and they took it apart and then they gave it back and it would not hold any air pressure (they had the fork for a week). The mechanic said they did not have the specific fox tools to put it back together????? He told me to take it to another bike shop and they might be able to fix it????I had my truck loaded to head to crested butte for the weekend and i wanted to give this dude an arm-bar and choke him out!! The showroom floor has over a million dollars worth of inventory and they don't even have tools to service the bikes they sell???? Awesome!!!! They did give me a S-Works demo to take for the weekend which was super cool but take a guess where i don't shop anymore?

    The stumpjumper is long gone now and i found a small bike shop that kicks ass!! It's a great feeling to find a shop that will take care of you and get it done right the first time and treat you nice!! I even look forward heading to the bike shop, i use to dread it like the plague!!
    Now i see why people always harp on buying from your local bike shop, i just had to find the right one.






    Quote Originally Posted by offtherack
    This was pretty much my assumption. I wish they would have spent another five minutes with it. Heck, take it around the block once. It would have saved me a few visits.

    Of course I don't blame the shop for the hub, or now the pivot bearing (although they did report the creaking issue was finally solved in one of the pivots, so they had been in there). It just compounds my frustration after the initial carelessness, and they haven't been supportive. I wish they'd stand behind the merchandise they sold me a little more. It wouldn't take much. Heck, just lie to me - tell you me you called around and couldn't get the part quicker. Instead it's a one minute look and "we'll have to call the bike company monday, let me get your name and number".

    They haven't charged me for any of the warranty service, and I wouldn't say they've cheated me at all.

    They're fast food, I now realize. Wish I could go back and patronize a different bike shop.

  27. #27
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    I guess the other important question is why does the shop have to keep ordering parts for you everytime something goes wrong? It seems to me (growing up in a family who owned a ski shop) that a "good" shop should have a sufficient stock of the replacement parts to replace that which comes on the bikes that they sell. Really doesn't make sense to have to special order a part every time something breaks. Just a no brainer to me. It sounds as though they are really not earning your business. You are probably just as well off to learn how to fix the bike and buy the parts over the internet cheaper and change it out yourself or find another shop.

    -E

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser
    No moral of the story is if you want it fixed right do it yourself.

    Ditto.

    There are some great shops out there, but it's been my experience that the only way to avoid this sort of thing is to learn how to take care of your own bike and leave the tougher stuff (wheelbuilding, etc...) to a shop you trust, like Mojo Wheels or Redstone Cyclery.

    The truth of the matter is that you should know the basic stuff anyhow, if you're going to be riding around in the woods miles away from your car.

    One question about the creaking - did you wash your new bike with a hose? Doing so has made several of my bikes creak like crazy, until a mechanic friend explained the connection to me.
    Now with more vitriol!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdw0123
    The fact that you bought a bike from this shop and they "remain unapologetic" speaks volumes about the shop. Also, the fact that they are not preemptively offering you a loaner says alot as well. The shop is really out of line. That you are not naming which shop is dropping the ball shows some patience and class on your part but I think that it is time for you to explain to them that they owe you a loaner bike so you can get out and ride. Good luck with your conversation with the bike shop owner.
    Customer service is not dead.
    Find the shop that has it ....stick with them.
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    WRC used to have good CS. I dont know now.

    OP: ANY bike you buy prebuilt should be taken apart and reassembled with grease in the right places . Wheels tensioned etc.... A small hassle for a quality build.(yes they should be good right from the shop but....)
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  30. #30
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    A couple things.

    -I do a good amount of repairs myself. My thought was, this is my new baby so I'll have professionals work on it. I realize now that was a silly thought, for this shop. I'm sure they have some talent there, but it's a rush environment.

    -The bike is a Specialized Stumpjumper. I'm going to leave the shop name out of it for now. I think I'll have a talk with a "manager" there, and see if I can feel any better about the situation. Besides, at the moment they have my bike.
    That said, let me recall one encounter: I dropped the bike off after the rear hub went out. I was disappointed to learn they'd have to have the part delivered and I'd be waiting a week. Anyway, I asked them to true the front wheel while they had it, and also check it over ("lifetime service"). A week later I pick it up and the front wheel is clearly untouched. I mention that and he trues it while I wait (without taking the tire off). I can only assume no "lifetime service" has been done, too. This is confirmed when I get home and realize the back brake is rubbing hard - the wheel they rebuilt. Sigh.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by offtherack
    The bike is a Specialized Stumpjumper.
    FWIW; I've an '06, on which I've trashed the pivot bearings, rear hub and the shock has been warrantied three (or was it four?) times. The bike shop has no control over warranty issues or how long it takes to get a part.

    For the sake of playing devil's advocate, have you ever messed up at work? Heck, I know I have. We all make mistakes. Talk to the manager (nicely - don't be a pushover, but keep in mind anger and hateful language rarely yield positive results) before thrashing a (yet to be named) shop on the internet. They cannot give you something you don't ask for.

    I can say I've been very happy with the friendly, competent service I've had at the following:

    1. Golden Bike Shop
    2. Wheat Ridge
    3. Green Mountain Sports
    4. Edge Works/Bicycle Dr
    5. Turin


    I hear great things about Dave and Larry's shops, however, they're really out of my bubble.


  32. #32
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    For the love of Pete, NAME THE SHOP! You come on here b!+ching and moaning about how you've been wrong'd. How deep does that shop need to poke you before you realize protecting them does other shoppers not a DAMN bit of good?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitek79
    Is 2 grand considered cheap?
    It's a lot of money for a bicycle.

    However, I tend to walk away from threads where the poster indicates how much they spent, as if there is extra entitlement involved with their money. It doesn't matter if they are right or wrong, but there's a strong correlation between their indication of the money off the bat and the outcomes of these kinds of stories.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y
    For the love of Pete, NAME THE SHOP! You come on here b!+ching and moaning about how you've been wrong'd. How deep does that shop need to poke you before you realize protecting them does other shoppers not a DAMN bit of good?
    I agree completely. If a merchant of any sort is doing poor business, they deserve to have that publicized and to deal with the ramifications of that publicity. Who knows, that publicity might serve as the impetus for improvement on their part.

    Msurk

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by msurk
    I agree completely. If a merchant of any sort is doing poor business, they deserve to have that publicized and to deal with the ramifications of that publicity. Who knows, that publicity might serve as the impetus for improvement on their part.

    Msurk
    Nothing motivates like the bottom line. And nothing impacts the bottom line like a bit of public knowledge of p!ss poor service. Of course this can be abused. But judging from the OP's experience and the mech issues he's encountered, he's got grounds for some dissatisfaction.
    And yes hitek, $2K is a lot of money regardless of whatever elitist attitudes you may run into on this forum. I'm also in the same boat as Snowskills which at $2k, you're looking at fork and wheels at a very good deal. But so what, it's still $2k!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y
    I'm also in the same boat as Snowskills which at $2k, you're looking at fork and wheels at a very good deal. But so what, it's still $2k!
    Me too. I have a $6,000 road bike, but I certainly wouldn't say a $2,000 bike is cheap.

  37. #37
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    In boulder there are 3 spec dealers I know of and I wouldn't shop at any of them.
    University bikes, bicycle village, and boulder cycle sport.
    All poo IMO.

    2k aint squat for a bike.

    Sorry but its the truth.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by TIMBERRR
    2k aint squat for a bike.
    Correction: $2k aint squat for a bike of someone on this forum.

    $2k is a lot for Joe Schmoe off the street who looks at cycling as an option, and not a necessity/life-style/main form of entertainment.

    Just like audio/video-philes, $2k "aint squat" for stereos/TVs. But $2k for a LCD can get you a lot these days! Hell, my discontinued 46" XBR4 for $1500 is a LOT of TV, but "aint squat" for an videophile. But I consider those people friggin' nutz! I'm sure Joe Schmoe would think just about everyone on this forum (the elitists of the sport) are also friggin' nutz!

    So let's keep things in perspective, $2k aint no squat. We're just over the top.

  39. #39
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    I got my SC Heckler for under 1700$ summer of 2007 and I ll say yes 2K is a lot of money for your first full suspension bike in my opinion, I have upgraded the Heckler over the past 2.5 seasons of riding and it would take more than 2K to replace it now, but, for the money I got a very reliable and fun bike, in the future I might consider spending 3K or more on a bike but I still have to squeeze some of my moneys worth out of the Heckler As far as the OP goes I think that the shop doesn't need to be mentioned until he has a chance to contact them and let them know what his perception of how the shop has ben treating him goes, and how they react to it. They might sympathize and go above and beyond in customer service which would be great or they might give him some attitude and some BS and then by all means he can come here and out them
    2007'ish Heckler and 2006 Chameleon
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    $2,000 is a lot for a two wheeled vehicle without a motor. More is an insane amount that people outside us fanatics should not be expected to understand. Us fanatics quickly loose perspective. (I have two bikes each costing more then twice $2,000. I don't even tell people. They wouldn't understand).

    I don't care how little a bike or any product costs. If its used within its designed purpose the product should work for the purchaser and the customer should be treated with respect by the merchant in the case of difficulties. I'm sure this is an aberration regarding Specialized. I've heard good things about them, but the shop should step up the customer service. Its clearly time to have a level headed constructive conversation with the manager. The trick is not to get upset. Ask for the manager's help in making things right.

    Msurk

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    Sports Garage in Boulder, but you won't be getting a bike for 2K. To be honest, if you got a full suspension for 2K I am not all that surprised you are having issues. Not to slam you, just a fact of life. At that price the components or frame have to be skimped on. If the frame is decent than I know for a fact your wheels suck and a blow hub is not all that surprising. A creak...well my Yeti creaked day one and still does six years later. I can fix it but then the seat always falls down. Part of mountain biking imho. As for a pivot going bad, depends on who did the assembly. If the factory did it I say crappy bike or crappy luck. If the shop did it then never go there again. Pay the cash and find a great mechanic to stick with for life (or till you learn to fix it yourself).

    Sorry to hear your luck is sucking and I hope you have a better time the rest of the season.

    Lifetime service means Bicycle Village and they only do the free service one month in the winter. Read the fine print it sucks. Look for an old guy there that does the fittings. He has huge calvs and seems a little odd at first. He is a PHD in something and super cool/nice. Chat him up a little and see if he can help iron out the temperment of the craptastic staff that is a signature of WallBike I.E. Preformance, Bicycle Village and ofter Trek Bikes.

  42. #42
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    op: sucks that the shop doesn't have quaility customer service. i hope the manager or owner takes care of you. maybe it isn't the shop's fault all of those issues are happening, but they should stand behind their product- the least they can do is give you a loaner. just like when you have to bring your car in under warranty and there are issues.

    please do name the shop- even if it's after speaking with the manager- it will be intersting to hear the whole story. if the manager is good, then hopefully he is at least empathetic and stands behind the brand he chooses to sell. if you still don't get anywhere with a manager, hopefully the owner does something- if not, screw them and let everyone know about it. then find a new shop, have them look your bike over and start building a new relationship.

    good luck!
    ez
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  43. #43
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    Here's my thought on it. Not so much as a bike shop owner, but more as a rider who always valued durability over anything else.

    I'm not sure about the $2k vs $5k durability facts. A $2k bike should hold up for everyday riding about as well as a $4k bike at least for the first couple of years. If the $2k bike is well speced, the difference should be more weight and performance than durability. Of course there are many poorly speced bikes, but for $2k I would want Fox shocks front and rear( or equal quality from Rock Shox), Deore level components(durability does not get much better with XT/XTR just a good bit smoother) and some good wheels . I would not expect tubeless wheels, or aluminum chainrings, or carbon bars/seatpost, Ti railed saddle, kevlar tires, but none of those things add durability just lighter weight and better ride. If the bike is speced well(where the product manager focused on building a good bike, not just putting on a top notch rear derailleur), and the shop took the time to assemble it well, you should be able to go out and hammer a $2k bike daily.

    Now after 3-4 years, a more expensive bike is worth tuning and keeping up to date, while a $2k bike may be ready to replace if you've really ridden it daily, but for those first few years--I would expect durability out of my $2k.

    just my 2 cents of selling $2k bikes for the past 20 years. I bet your bike is not so far off of this level, the shop with some effort should get you rolling and happy again.
    Last edited by Kaj; 06-07-2009 at 09:55 PM.
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ignazjr
    If you paid $2k, chances are your bike was preassembled, put in the box then shipped to the shop. A shop mechnic pulled it out of the box and slapped it together, probably in a timely enough fashion to get right on to the next bike. The brakes rubbed, but were "good enough." The chain was a couple of links to long because that's what the assembly factory did before they put it on the box. The brakes should've been perfect, but the chain thing isn't really that big of a deal.

    The hub and the pivot bearing sound like they are more than likely excusible warranty claims. Those things just happen. Sucky that you got a double whammy on it, though. A creek 4 months down the road is par for the cours on a mountain bike, but the bike shouldn't be creaking after only a couple of rides. Creaks and brake rubs are something that shouldn't take more than a day or two tops regardless of how busy the shop is. That stuff is quick and easy to fix usually. When you need extra parts, though, the wait times are acceptable. No shop can stock every part for every bike. You're looking at a 3-4 day shipping time to get the part plus a day or two to get the fix done depending on how busy the shop is.

    Sounds like you've had a bit of bad luck and some not over the top great service. I'd ask for a loaner bike, what the heck. It never hurts to ask. I wouldn't be upset if they say no, though. That would be an example of over the top great service, but wouldn't be expected.
    This man has good words from good experience.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by 05Willys
    Sports Garage in Boulder, but you won't be getting a bike for 2K. To be honest, if you got a full suspension for 2K I am not all that surprised you are having issues.
    Got my Heckler at the Sports Garage for about 1700$ and like Kaj said I think durability is fine my bike just weighs in kind of heavy'ish.
    2007'ish Heckler and 2006 Chameleon
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  46. #46
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    Most bikes at that price point would have a low end Shimano (Deore?) rear hub, but Specialized likes to use their own in house "Specialized" stuff...I think maybe I'd be more angry about how the manufacturer buries cheap parts on the bike. Other companies don't do it that way as much, like Jamis and Santa Cruz to name a few. So the OP should be looking to replace certain "specialized" parts real soon with atleast low end reliable name brand parts...and do the work yourself! Being able to diagnose and fix problems empowers you and makes you feel less helpless, more knowledgeable, and that sometimes results in less frustration. Oh, am I still talking about bikes?
    This won't hurt a bit...

  47. #47
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    stop buying bikes that creak.

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    It really doesn't matter if your bike costs $500!

    You shouldn't have these issues..and after the 2nd time, or maybe 3rd worst case of you bringing the bike back in, it should've been swapped for a new one. At our shop, we have an intensive check in, and setup process for EVERY bike that is assembled. Out the door, whether you are buying a $500 bike, or a $5000 bike, they both mean the world to the person buying them and wanting to ride them worry free. There are no excuses for what you've had to deal with..and it's more than likely the manufacturer, but regardless the shop should've gone to bat for you. Same type of thing happened to my cousin in CA..and it went on for a year. He finally bought a new bike out of my shop here and we shipped it to him. Sucks that it's happening! Hope it all works out and you get back on your ride.
    Guerilla Gravity stable: Megatrail, Trail Pistol, Pedalhead

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by offtherack
    Advice appreciated. Anything I can do, beside wait and be frustrated?

    I bought a bike from a (popular, reputable) Boulder bike shop four months ago. I paid $2000. Two days later I was back at the shop because after riding I realized the chain was 2+ links too long, also the brakes were rubbing. Wait a day. A week later I'm back again, this time so they can check into the horrific creak. Took them a couple days but they found it. Except on my next ride it was louder than ever. Another two days at the shop.

    Repeat that patten a couple times - them fixing things that I don't think should be problems on a brand new bike. I asked them many times "I just bought this here, can you please check it over and dial it in." That never seemed to take - I had to discover this stuff on the trails.

    Two weeks ago the rear hub went out. Fun walk to the parking lot. Shop took a week to get the part and have the bike ready.

    Two days ago, after a ride, I notice there's a lot of play in a pivot in the rear suspension. I brought it by for what I hoped would be a quick tighten and learned they need a bearing for the pivot. They'll call the bike co. on Monday, wait on delivery, and I'm depressed again on a beautiful Saturday. They're unapologetic.

    Am I just unlucky? Should the shop be taking better care of me? ie, are these week long waits usual? Should I ask for a loaner bike?

    Crap.... It sounds like you bought a chevy.
    ~ Honestly... any idea what their refund / exchange policy is?

    I can tell you this much from my experience.
    Recently @ a LBS I purchased an left over / late model RM Slayer50 model for a pretty kick butt price. After riding it on the rocky terrain we have here, the head-tube creeked and the front bomber fork was just squishy and seem like not holding air (lack of oil).
    Keep in mind this is a *new* bike, but has been sitting. Before taking delivery they were suppose to inspect it and making sure it was safe / properly to ride.
    As it comes down to, they half assed the work and I decided to do the work on it myself. I pulled most of the parts off relube'd everything and woo-laa.

    I never ever had a wheelset go out, but I have snapped plenty of hangers. Even on my RM and still waiting from Northshore billet to send me some.

    Good luck and hope they'll get you squared away
    Last edited by TX_Shifter; 06-09-2009 at 08:56 AM.

  50. #50
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    Its clear that nobody on this forum has worked at the retail level of the cycling industry, bike builders make $8 an hour, good mechanics may make $12-15. the industry does not have the resources to offer quality control like the automotive, electronics etc... industries do. things break, things creak (stumpjumpers especially), things are defective... constantly. the 8 year old girl in Taiwan that prebled your avid brakes most likely did a crappy job. Also think about the amount of people who own a bicycle/bicycles in your area, now think about how many bike shops there are in your area... this time of year the shops are busy, crazy busy... be patient and polite to the poor guy that makes 18K a year so everyone with a neglected bike can ride on a nice day. Customer service is important but with that kind of volume a couple people are gonna be upset because they think they should come before the next customer, it is what it is. it doesn't matter if you buy a $300 bike or a $7000 bike these things happen, its summertime bike shops are busy!

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbkid
    Its clear that nobody on this forum has worked at the retail level of the cycling industry, bike builders make $8 an hour, good mechanics may make $12-15. the industry does not have the resources to offer quality control like the automotive, electronics etc... industries do. things break, things creak (stumpjumpers especially), things are defective... constantly. the 8 year old girl in Taiwan that prebled your avid brakes most likely did a crappy job. Also think about the amount of people who own a bicycle/bicycles in your area, now think about how many bike shops there are in your area... this time of year the shops are busy, crazy busy... be patient and polite to the poor guy that makes 18K a year so everyone with a neglected bike can ride on a nice day. Customer service is important but with that kind of volume a couple people are gonna be upset because they think they should come before the next customer, it is what it is. it doesn't matter if you buy a $300 bike or a $7000 bike these things happen, its summertime bike shops are busy!

    10+ years as a bike mechanic thats why no one puts there hands on my bikes.

  52. #52
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    I'll bet you 3 beers I know from which shop you bought that bike. I've heard several similar complaints from my customers about a particular shop. Good luck and hopefully everything will work out for you.
    Last edited by mwolff001; 06-09-2009 at 10:25 PM.

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    I call bs. It doesn't matter what the labor is paid. If the product doesn't function as designed when used within reason, the product or assembly is faulty. This in turn should cause the seller and/or manufacturer to make corrections. If a functional product cannot be sold at a profitable price, the manufacturer can and should leave that business.

    I work in IT. We purchase many very sophisticated but essential small electronic parts which are assembled in Mexico where I am certain labor is paid much less then the standard of living in the US would demand and possibly that of Mexico too. In my line of work people's live's depend on these parts and they do, indeed, function as designed and clearly Cisco makes a profit.

    When a consumer purchases a product at any price, that product should function and if the business is run correctly, they should make a profit as well.

    Msurk

  54. #54
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    Clearly it is BV in Boulder.
    Having intuited that I am completely unsurprised that you have gotten this kind of service from them. I've gone looking to test ride some Specialized Enduros and no one said hello or offered anything. When I finally did get to test ride, many little things were not adjusted correctly and I noticed them in 5 minutes.
    This isn't always the case with chain bike shops as sometimes they get lucky and hire a mechanic who is skilled, detail oriented and has pride in their work. However they usually alienate said talent with stupid quotas or lousy pay and they leave. YMMV, etc but there are reasons why it's better to frequent shops with good reputations for quality or just do the work yourself.
    Every new bike I've ever gotten has always gotten a full overhaul before I ever ride just for this reason. It makes a big difference in enjoyment and overall bike and component longevity.

  55. #55
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    "How quickly the world owes you something..."

    Man, what a lame thread. Ignazjr nailed it in the 5th post and others echoed what he said afterward. Yet somehow, after 53 posts, there are still folks posting with the undertone that the OP has essentially been victimized and that the shop should go above and beyond to make it right. And customer service is dead, seriously? Customer service may be alive and kicking or cold and dead depending where you shop, but one thing that seems to be universal, and this thread indicates this strongly, is that customer expectations are on the rise and approaching unrealistic levels. If your expectations are to be treated like a king and you aren't, don't shop there. It's not rocket surgery.

    But even then, I don't think the name of the shop needs to be mentioned because the issues described need to be brought to the attention of the shop manager, not the MTBR forums. If things get out of hand after the manager is involved, which they are far from at this point, then take it to the public. But I actually respect that the OP has not mentioned the shop name until the manager has been made aware of the issues the OP has experienced -- even if I do think some of them are ignorance related -- and been allowed to respond to those issues.

    Offtherack, welcome to the bike world and the fact that very expensive parts break out of nowhere. It sucks that your first experiences have been relatively negative, but hang in there, find another shop that meets your needs -- I recommend Redstone Cyclery -- and keep pedaling. As your experience with bikes and parts increases, so will the positive experiences with shops and mechanicals.
    A trail thatís too difficult wouldnít exist because itíd never be used. But, trails can exist thatíre too difficult for you.

  56. #56
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    I'm a little reluctant to blast another bike shop because I don't know all the facts and sometimes you do get a "perfect storm" of bad luck on a bike-- I once sold a bike that just seemed to be cursed (good customer but bad seal on fork, bad brake caliper, and both failed within a month; then the shock company "lost" the fork and took nearly a month to replace it).

    Sometimes the big chain shops offer deep discounts on bikes that smaller shops just can't match. All too frequently, however, the killer deal has drawbacks-- like poor service or bad build quality. What then? It's nice when you have the skills to rebuild a bike on your own, but not everyone has the experience or the time to do it.

    Perhaps the best approach going forward is to find a shop where you are confident and comfortable with the level of service. Take your bike there, even if you bought it at another shop, and let them inspect/tune it for you. It may cost you a little, but in the long run it's a small price to pay for the confidence of riding a finely tuned machine.

    A good mechanic will be able to correctly identify service vs. warranty issues. If there are any warranty issues, take it back to the original shop to resolve them. You can also attempt to have the original shop reimburse you for the tune-- believe it or not some shops will do this; it isn't common, but worth the shot.

    Once your bike is back on the trail and working fine, chalk it up to experience and give all your future business to the shop that gave you the best service.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbkid
    Its clear that nobody on this forum has worked at the retail level of the cycling industry, bike builders make $8 an hour, good mechanics may make $12-15. the industry does not have the resources to offer quality control like the automotive, electronics etc... industries do. things break, things creak (stumpjumpers especially), things are defective... constantly. the 8 year old girl in Taiwan that prebled your avid brakes most likely did a crappy job. Also think about the amount of people who own a bicycle/bicycles in your area, now think about how many bike shops there are in your area... this time of year the shops are busy, crazy busy... be patient and polite to the poor guy that makes 18K a year so everyone with a neglected bike can ride on a nice day. Customer service is important but with that kind of volume a couple people are gonna be upset because they think they should come before the next customer, it is what it is. it doesn't matter if you buy a $300 bike or a $7000 bike these things happen, its summertime bike shops are busy!
    Poor customer service justification FAIL!

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by msurk
    I call bs. It doesn't matter what the labor is paid. If the product doesn't function as designed when used within reason, the product or assembly is faulty. This in turn should cause the seller and/or manufacturer to make corrections. If a functional product cannot be sold at a profitable price, the manufacturer can and should leave that business.

    I work in IT. We purchase many very sophisticated but essential small electronic parts which are assembled in Mexico where I am certain labor is paid much less then the standard of living in the US would demand and possibly that of Mexico too. In my line of work people's live's depend on these parts and they do, indeed, function as designed and clearly Cisco makes a profit.

    When a consumer purchases a product at any price, that product should function and if the business is run correctly, they should make a profit as well.

    Msurk
    Yeah, but the rest of us live in the real world...where you're lucky if you ever fully get what you pay for! Not even Mexico (or Taiwan) can fix that!
    This won't hurt a bit...

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbkid
    Its clear that nobody on this forum has worked at the retail level of the cycling industry, bike builders make $8 an hour, good mechanics may make $12-15. the industry does not have the resources to offer quality control like the automotive, electronics etc... industries do. things break, things creak (stumpjumpers especially), things are defective... constantly. the 8 year old girl in Taiwan that prebled your avid brakes most likely did a crappy job. Also think about the amount of people who own a bicycle/bicycles in your area, now think about how many bike shops there are in your area... this time of year the shops are busy, crazy busy... be patient and polite to the poor guy that makes 18K a year so everyone with a neglected bike can ride on a nice day. Customer service is important but with that kind of volume a couple people are gonna be upset because they think they should come before the next customer, it is what it is. it doesn't matter if you buy a $300 bike or a $7000 bike these things happen, its summertime bike shops are busy!
    And it's obvious you have no perception of reality of other countries.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricD4
    I guess the other important question is why does the shop have to keep ordering parts for you everytime something goes wrong? It seems to me (growing up in a family who owned a ski shop) that a "good" shop should have a sufficient stock of the replacement parts to replace that which comes on the bikes that they sell. Really doesn't make sense to have to special order a part every time something breaks. Just a no brainer to me. It sounds as though they are really not earning your business. You are probably just as well off to learn how to fix the bike and buy the parts over the internet cheaper and change it out yourself or find another shop.
    Understanding of how many different types, brands, models, and bicycle parts there are FAIL!
    Last edited by Nickle; 06-10-2009 at 02:36 PM.
    A trail thatís too difficult wouldnít exist because itíd never be used. But, trails can exist thatíre too difficult for you.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickle
    Understanding of how many different types, brands, models, and bicycle parts there are in the FAIL!


    But is it really too much to ask for to stock replacements for what you sell along with the most commonly requested/sold products?

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricD4


    But is it really too much to ask for to stock replacements for what you sell along with the most commonly requested/sold products?
    Think of how many different parts there are on one bicycle. Now consider how that part spec changes within a single model depending on the level that was purchased. Now multiply that number across all the different models AND manufacturers carried. That a huge number of spare parts to keep in the back not to mention the tremendous overhead associated with that inventory. And that's even taking into consideration that there will be many overlaps. A shop would easily have more overhead wrapped up in spare parts than they would for bikes on the floor if they even tried to carry half of all spare parts. That's not overhead that would be easily sold off and would be quickly obsoleted every time a new model/part is released.

    I think most shops try to stock the most commonly requested parts, but even that is a difficult task since many times you don't know what's commonly requested until it is commonly requested. It's difficult to know that main pivot bearings are a commonly requested item on a new model until you have a number of folks come in asking for them... and then telling them you don't have them and will have to order them.
    A trail thatís too difficult wouldnít exist because itíd never be used. But, trails can exist thatíre too difficult for you.

  63. #63
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    When I worked in a bike shop we had "JRA" riders, those people who always seemed to have some sort of problem (mysterious double flat, missing derailleur, cracked frame, etc.) that occurred while they were "Just Riding Along". Treat these folks right after the sale and more oft than not, they become your best customers.

    Even with the 1st-gen Specialized FSR frames, the bushings seemed to need frequent replacement (or were they bearings back then?).

    Regardless, if I had $2k to spend on a full-suspension rig, I'd go with a Giant TransX. I have a friend who owns a bike shop back east and after what Specialized tried to do to him (and apparently Specialized is rather notorious for their treatment of IBD's who don't sell their soul to them), I'll never buy or recommend a Specialized bicycle again.

  64. #64
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    State of the Consumer

    Quote Originally Posted by snowskilz
    \ My fork and cranks retail for what he bought his bike for. In mtn biking you pay for what you get.

    Plain and simple you get what you pay for!

    I'm gonna go out on a limb here and suggest that by clarifying the retail value of your parts that you didn't actually pay full value for your parts. Which makes you like a majority of the mountain bike enthusiast market which doesn't want to pay to support the industry well and gets pissed off when they don't get service that is equivilant to that of a BMW dealership. Believe me snowskilz that this is not a dig on you personally but it does present a very clear picture of why situations like "offtherack's" exist. At the end of the day, the mountain bike industry is cheap, broke and oversaturated with mid pack racers who want a pro deal on everything they can get just to sell it to the second hand market later and leave the actual dealer with nothing throughout the process except a bunch of same day service requests.

    I would argue that customer service is not dead, rather that the consumer is just more aware of customer service related topics due to the increase in markets which are competed for solely on the basis of customer service. The catch with the incident in this discussion is that here is a company that was created by the Wal-Mart consumer mentality. To everyone outside of the industry, you must realize that you cannot be mad at something YOU as a market created. Remember that businesses form in response to a demand. Businesses themselves do not create the demand. In this case the mentioned bike shop responded to a collective cry from the consumer cycling market that wanted sub 2000 dollar bikes, same day service, on the spot fits, an infinite product inventory, etc, etc. The equation here states that the market wants a lot of output for very little input. And thus we arrive at the previously mentioned statement... You get what you pay for.

    The reality is that specifically the firsthand mountain bike market is relatively small and the demands and pressures put on dealers in that market are very large. It is true that there are shops out there with incredible product selections and great customer service, etc. And it is also likely that those shops can't pay their bills and are frequently on credit holds with their creditors forcing their owners to not be able to sleep at night. On the flip side, there are companies with tighter product selections that may not be on credit holds but certainly have to deal with the stress of routinely telling frustrated customers that they can't have their bike for a week. Moral of the story... the dealer is pinched in the middle once again. Now I'm not trying to make a pitty party for those of us that turn wrenches for a living because at the end of the day, I love what I do. But what I find amazing is that throughout this thread there is a continued underappreciation for those guys behind the counter at the shop you just got your "smokin deal" on. Realistically by the time you show up, that mechanic you're talking to has likely seen 10 to 15 other similar problems that day alone. And it is likely that they've all come with the same unappreciative attitudes which are lucky to even garner a "thanks" at the end of the conversation. What I'm trying to say is, have you even considered rolling your Landrover through the liqour store on the way to the bike shop and picking up a six pack for the mechanic who's probably going to stay late and miss another ride so that he can help you, the same consumer who wanted an ultra low priced bike 2 months ago? I can assure you that just as you, the consumer, will go out of your way to take care of a shop that took care of you, we, the mechanics, will go out of our way to take care of a customer who's taken care of us.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by ignazjr
    If you paid $2k, chances are your bike was preassembled, put in the box then shipped to the shop. A shop mechnic pulled it out of the box and slapped it together, probably in a timely enough fashion to get right on to the next bike. The brakes rubbed, but were "good enough." The chain was a couple of links to long because that's what the assembly factory did before they put it on the box. The brakes should've been perfect, but the chain thing isn't really that big of a deal.

    The hub and the pivot bearing sound like they are more than likely excusible warranty claims. Those things just happen. Sucky that you got a double whammy on it, though. A creek 4 months down the road is par for the cours on a mountain bike, but the bike shouldn't be creaking after only a couple of rides. Creaks and brake rubs are something that shouldn't take more than a day or two tops regardless of how busy the shop is. That stuff is quick and easy to fix usually. When you need extra parts, though, the wait times are acceptable. No shop can stock every part for every bike. You're looking at a 3-4 day shipping time to get the part plus a day or two to get the fix done depending on how busy the shop is.

    Sounds like you've had a bit of bad luck and some not over the top great service. I'd ask for a loaner bike, what the heck. It never hurts to ask. I wouldn't be upset if they say no, though. That would be an example of over the top great service, but wouldn't be expected.
    Second that!!!!!!!!

  66. #66
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    Resolution?

    Offrherack,

    Did this situation ever get resolved?

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