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Thread: bike fit

  1. #1
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    bike fit

    I'm headed to denver next week, and I just can't quite seem to get comfy on my newest bike.

    I'll be heading up on Weds, July 7th and will come home on Sunday, July 11th.

    I'd like to get a fitment done while there, but I will be on a tight schedule and don't want to get an appointment to just have it canceled or have them be behind schedule, etc.

    So...

    I need a shop that is reliable, first and foremost. 2nd, I want as good of a fit as I can get.

    I'd rather pay top dollar because an additional trip up to Denver to get fit is going to cost me a lot of money, and it is just too dang hard for me to get to a shop only to have a guy that really doesn't know what he's doing fit me and it not work out. Additionally, since I don't really know anything about myself, I won't be able to help them much. I've always just bought a bike and ridden it until I figured everything out. For some reason, on this bike I just can't, so I don't know how much help I'll be for the "fitter".

    Anyway, I've looked up Retul and they have a couple of slots open in Boulder while I'm in town. Anyone else want to reccomend someone else over Retul or warn me away from Boulder for any reason?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Ned at Campus Cycles does good work and the service at the shop is great. BR

  3. #3
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    Green Mtn Sports

    Corky at Green Mountain Sports is excellent for bike fit. I have paid top dollar twice for bike fits else where, once with an experienced health care professional and once at one of metro Denver's best known shops that advertised a full service fit program. Both times I ended up back at Corky's to fix the issues caused by the other fitters. I will never go anywhere else again.

  4. #4
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    Are Corky and Ned reliable? How much do they cost?

    Thanks

  5. #5
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    Corky and GMS

    Corky is very reliable, I have been a customer of his and GMS for 15 years. He charges around $100, and can be reached at 303-987-8758.

  6. #6
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    Also check into Boulder Center for Sports Medicine. Sean and Andy there do a top notch job. They have medical backgrounds as well as cycling backgrounds so it could benefit you more than going to a shop guy trained in "fitting."
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  7. #7
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    Retul

    Go to Retul
    It's on 30 th street in Boulder
    Ask for Todd Carver
    he will help you
    All of the top racers go to Retul

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by R steve
    Go to Retul
    It's on 30 th street in Boulder
    Ask for Todd Carver
    he will help you
    All of the top racers go to Retul
    Well said. +1

  9. #9
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    What sort of fit are you looking for? XC fit is completely different from DH fit, AM fit, DJ fit and Trials fit.
    Golden Bike Park Group

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    Trestle Bike Park

  10. #10
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    Oh, sorry. This is for XC, but not racing. I'm just a recreational rider that wants to be more comfortable on this new bike.

  11. #11
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    Panhndl,
    Where did you end up going and what did you think of them?

  12. #12
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    I went to Retul in Boulder and was fit by Mat. I took all the 1.5 hours they had me scheduled for. The basic fit is about $250 plus any stems, seats, or bars you buy. My total was about $350 with the Ritchey stem I bought.

    I was having problems with numbness in my hands and my butt. I had purchased several saddles, bars, and stems trying to sort things out. For some reason, I just couldn't manage to get comfy.

    The shop is pretty small with one fitting studio. Mat was the only staff in residence when I arrived, but it was late Friday and they had a university going on at the same time so no one else was around.

    Mat was a very nice guy who hooked me right up and got started. First thing was to get my bike hooked up to a stationary trainer. That required a wheel switch. Next we got me fitted with velcro dots at my knee, hip, ankle, foot, shoulder, etc. Retul hangs transmitters (I actually think they were diodes) to your various parts and you have to ride the bike to they can "capture" your movement on the bike. I think he was having me output various kilowatts, but I'm not sure and didn't ask.

    After they have their initial capture, they basically move the saddle up/down and forward/backward along with any stem changes. I was really screwed up and frankly I'm not expirienced enough to be a lot of help with the procedure. He made pretty sweeping changes to my saddle placement and had me ride again and got another "capture". Then we fiddled with my stem, changing it out. Another capture and then further fiddling with my saddle.

    Now, from my totally inexpirienced position, I could really "feel" it when we got things "right". All of a sudden, I'd have a LOT more power, and comfort. Being a novice and riding incorrectly for so long, I don't think that was that surprising.

    If I understand the system correctly, the idea is that for the most comfort/power, there are zones that your movement should occur in when riding. Your legs should be at such and such angle at the top and such and such angle at the bottom of your spin.

    Since I was so far off at the beginning, we didn't do a lot of fine tuning. If I had been closer to an optimum, maybe we would have spent the entire time making very minor adjustments, but I wasn't.

    From my standpoint, the idea behind the Retul fit makes sense. Take the subjective portion of the bike fit away and just use the science. Your movements don't lie. The changes Mat made have REALLY helped since then, but because the heat has been so bad, the longest ride I've had since the fit was about an hour and half. I've put about 65 miles on the bike so it really is kind of early to say whether or not I'm completely satisfied. Additionally, Mat gave me a couple other changes to make and try over time. I haven't made any of those changes yet. It just seems too early.

    Lastly, additional trips to Retul to fine tune or add bikes doesn't cost the same as the initial one. He inputs all your data (including data on your bike) into the the computer and sends you an attachement of all your measurements. This data is stored in case you buy another bike or need to come back for some more fine tuning.

    I have to admit that my riding is MUCH more comfortable than before the fit, but I was so screwed up that it would have been about impossible to not have some improvements.

    If you are a total novice, I think you could get a fit from about any solid dealer and get a lot out of it. I am pleased with the fit and think it was money well spent but I'd guess I'm hardly typical. A better test would have been someone very expirienced that could say it improved my time by such and such.

    I think it is a good system but will openly admit that I haven't had any other fits and have very limited knowledge of them. I probably could have gotten the same improvements for less money since I was so green and screwed up. Would I have got the same improvements if I was as knowledgeable as many here? I don't know, but the lady with 3 bikes in front of me seemed very pleased, too.

    I'll be glad to try to explain anything else you want to know. Just ask.

  13. #13
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    Never heard of a "professional fitting" on an MTB. How would they decide what's "right" since everything is a compromise in regard to climbing/descending, powering/cornering? Even cleat placement varies depending on how you prioritize pedaling efficiency vs. stability/handling. I guess they could give you a baseline setup and explain the effect each change has but you'd still have to try each setting on the trail and decide what you like. If biometrics were the only deciding factor our XC bikes would position us just like our road bikes.
    Keep the Country country.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt
    Never heard of a "professional fitting" on an MTB. How would they decide what's "right" since everything is a compromise in regard to climbing/descending, powering/cornering? Even cleat placement varies depending on how you prioritize pedaling efficiency vs. stability/handling. I guess they could give you a baseline setup and explain the effect each change has but you'd still have to try each setting on the trail and decide what you like. If biometrics were the only deciding factor our XC bikes would position us just like our road bikes.
    You probably wouldn't benefit from a fitting much.

    And "professional fitting"...I'm guessing there are quite a few people that would argue that getting fit by a professional for your bike would be beneficial.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by panhndl
    And "professional fitting"...I'm guessing there are quite a few people that would argue that getting fit by a professional for your bike would be beneficial.
    By "professional fitting" I meant the paid for, on a trainer, thorough fittings we did on road bikes at my shop. The guy would measure all your body parts, watch you pedal, and tell you where everything should go. For an MTB this seams like it would just result in a roadbike like position that would only be best for powering along smooth flats or climbs. These days every XCer makes concessions to handling (look at all the riser bars on a pro start line) and it seems personal preference outweighs biometrics. I guess so long as an MTB fitting ended with, "Try this out and report back" it could help people start to get their bike sorted.
    Keep the Country country.

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