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  1. #1
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    Best Tubes for the Front Range?

    Semi-serious question. Got a pinch flat at Apex. Pain in the ass. Anybody got a heavy duty tube they prefer? I know Performance actually makes some decent ones, but I dont think they have a heavy duty 26" tube with a Presta. Thoughts? I hate pinch flats, but dont want to hassle going tubeless yet.

  2. #2
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    Best Tubes for the Front Range?

    Hassling with tubeless has decreased my pinch flat issues from about 1 per every two rides, to a couple per year. YMMV.

    Also, tires with good sidewalls and proper air pressure are the key, not necessarily thicker tubes.
    The older I get, the faster I was.





    Punch it, Chewie.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Rizz View Post
    I hate pinch flats, but dont want to hassle going tubeless yet.
    I have found that not dealing pinch flats is far less of a hassle than going tubeless...
    I know that doesn't answer your question, sorry

  4. #4
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    How extensively have you tried tubeless? I ride 5x a week and also ride DH laps on my trail bike, I never get pinch flats and change tires (rear is an XC/AM tire, not DH) about every 6 months. Tubeless is the answer for the rocky, haggard terrain of CO.

    Gorilla tape = $3
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    2012 Knolly Chilcotin
    2002 Haro VGF V3 - Still have my first real mtb

  5. #5
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    Best Tubes for the Front Range?

    To actually answer your question, most manufacturers make mid- and heavy-weight tubes. Finding presta valves might be a thing, but it can be done. A quick Google search for "heavy duty presta bicycle tube" revealed a couple options...


    http://www.kendatire.com/en/bicycle/...bicycle-tubes/
    http://bicyclesouth.com/product/cont...e-181931-1.htm

    Also try REI maybe? Their house brand might work. All said, I stand by my earlier assertion that tires with good sidewalls and proper pressure will make more of a difference.
    The older I get, the faster I was.





    Punch it, Chewie.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Trucker View Post
    ... tires with good sidewalls and proper air pressure are the key, not necessarily thicker tubes.
    ^^ This.

    Probably the worst thing about tubes is that in order to avoid pinching you have to boost the pressure up to where you are sub-optimal in terms of handling. And you really need to check it pretty often. I'm bad about that, I'll just grab a bike and go, and won't really notice that I'm low until my first corner. And unless it's really low I might not notice for a while.

    Pressure slowly leaks down out of tires, tubes or not. They aren't perfectly non-porous, even when they are perfect. But obviously you can get a tiny little cactus thorn or some other really small puncture and have a slow leak. Makes it lots more likely that you'll get low-ish pressure and pinch.

    Thick tubes are a total waste of money and weight. They pinch and puncture just as readily as normal, basic butyl tubes. When I was still running tubes I ran sealant. Lead-pipe heavy but it kept me from having trouble in that area almost without exception. They slow-leaked much less unless they got a really bad puncture, or if they got so old that the sealant dried up.

    Like almost everyone else who rides mtbs more than three times/year, I've gone to tubeless. You can still pinch a tubeless tire, and you still have to mind your pressure or you can burp out your air or whatever. But it's way less hassle than otherwise if you get yourself a basic compressor.

    One super-big downside to tubeless that I've realized in the last six months: if you cut a sidewall or pinch a tire badly enough that the sealant won't fix it, you get into a less fixable solution than with tubes. Meaning, you can put a tube in, but if the cut is bad enough to let the tube bulge out, a tire boot won't stick now because the sealant makes the inside of the casing too slimy. Friend of mine had to actually find a litter coke bottle and put a peice of plasic inside the tire to get home.

    If you put a tube into a tire that had stans, you won't be able to patch it if you puncture again later. Tube becomes too slimy, patch won't stick. So if you put a tube in you better hope that you don't pinch or pick up a thorn.

    Back in the tubes days, you could boot a cut sidewall, put in a fresh tube, and if you had a patch kit you could deal with as many subsequent punctures as you had patches. With tubeless you can much more quickly get to a game-over scenario where you're walking.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Trucker View Post
    To actually answer your question, most manufacturers make mid- and heavy-weight tubes...
    My assertion would be, if you're going to bother with the weight and expense of a heavier tube, do a normal thickness tube with slime or other sealant. More robust, probably no heavier, and definitely more supple. Tires with those thick tubes ride like they're made of wood.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    One super-big downside to tubeless that I've realized in the last six months: if you cut a sidewall or pinch a tire badly enough that the sealant won't fix it, you get into a less fixable solution than with tubes. Meaning, you can put a tube in, but if the cut is bad enough to let the tube bulge out, a tire boot won't stick now because the sealant makes the inside of the casing too slimy. Friend of mine had to actually find a litter coke bottle and put a piece of plastic inside the tire to get home.
    An old trick is to use one or two dollar bills depending on the size of the slice. Should be enough to get you back to the point of origin. Nice thing is dollar bills are light, easy to carry and don't cost much.

  9. #9
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    I vote tubeless, but if you're totally against it, Maxxis makes a "freeride" tube that sits between a normal one and a DH tube.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    You guys suck im all bummed now

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Like almost everyone else who rides mtbs more than three times/year, I've gone to tubeless.
    That's not only obnoxious (and not usually your style from what I have seen here), it's wrong.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bagwhan View Post
    That's not only obnoxious (and not usually your style from what I have seen here), it's wrong.
    Yeah, that was a little harsh. And elitist-sounding. Mea culpa.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigSteve in CO View Post
    I vote tubeless, but if you're totally against it, Maxxis makes a "freeride" tube that sits between a normal one and a DH tube.
    Thanks for that suggestion. Looks like that might be the ticket for right now.

    I'll probably go tubeless eventually, but dont have the time to figure out the sealing/sealant thing right now. Thanks all!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Yeah, that was a little harsh. And elitist-sounding. Mea culpa.
    Best Tubes for the Front Range?-image.png
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  14. #14
    The 5th knuckle
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    Anyone used this?

    Name:  3655999A-1D09-7033-84B5437D83B1BDDA.jpg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  15. #15
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    Most shops have thorn resistant tubes. If they don't already have sealant in them, they can usually put some in. Having said that, none of them really protect very well against pinch flats - slime, true goo, even stans won't seal a pinch on the inside of a tube very well or at all. I did read somewhere that latex tubes are more resistant to pinch flats than butyl tubes....don't know if that's true or not but it makes some sense.

    Tubeless, although a more of a hassle in the garage, rarely leaves you stuck out on the trail unless you are running ww tires with very thin sidewalls. Save those for race day.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaycastlerock View Post
    Anyone used this?
    Yes. Fail. Would not stick.

    I'm interested in some of the other solutions. I know a guy from AZ who uses the plug style kits and then stitches up the tear with dental floss. Haven't tried it.

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    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Yes. Fail. Would not stick.

    I'm interested in some of the other solutions. I know a guy from AZ who uses the plug style kits and then stitches up the tear with dental floss. Haven't tried it.
    Interesting. When I was running the thin Specialized tires my bike came with I had a nasty cut on the rear tire. I used the tin foil my sandwich was wrapped in and it worked pretty well. Got me from Lennys back to the Indian creek trail head.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Yes. Fail. Would not stick.

    I'm interested in some of the other solutions. I know a guy from AZ who uses the plug style kits and then stitches up the tear with dental floss. Haven't tried it.

    Name:  3655999A-1D09-7033-84B5437D83B1BDDA.jpg
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    I just happened to google this Saturday after a nice puncture...

    Tech Tuesday - Three Ways to Save A Leaky Tubeless Tire - Pinkbike

  19. #19
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    What exactly about going tubeless is a hassle?
    2 Hands Working Do More Than 1000 Hands Praying

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Rizz View Post
    Got a pinch flat at Apex. Pain in the ass.
    Question for ya: did this happen yesterday 7/30 ? If so, what time were you riding?
    The older I get, the faster I was.





    Punch it, Chewie.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by provin1327 View Post
    What exactly about going tubeless is a hassle?
    Sometimes it's not.

    Sometimes it is.

    That's part of it, there's the question about whether the particular tire and/or rim and/or rimstrip-valve setup is going to work right. Uncertainty is a hassle. Walk out of a bike shop with a $60 tire not knowing whether it's going to work for you...

    Some tire beads are too loose, some ridiculously tight. Some just don't seem to be willing to seat and/or seal. Some blow right off the rim as soon as you pressure them up.

    I had a Continental X King Protection, seemed like a really nice tire. $60-ish. I put it on a tubeless-specific rim, a Bontrager Duster. It seated and sealed. I left it for a while with lots of pressure, probably 60 lbs or so for a little while then went and rode it. I let the pressure down into the low 20's and it started losing air around the bead as soon as I did any cornering on it. Just seemed like that was the way it was going to work.

    So I tried it on my ghetto setup, on a Mavic TN 719 that has worked flawlessly with other tires. Same deal. I tried everything I could think of--leaving it aired up hard, riding it for a couple rides on the road aired up hard (dangerous to trail ride that way, no cornering). Just wouldn't hold air when it was at riding pressure, only when it was pumped up to 45+ psi.

    I wound up putting a tube in it on the back of my SS just to use it up (cut the sidewall badly after a few rides--sh!tcanned it after less than a month).

    I blew a WTB tire right off the rim.

    I have had VERY good luck with Specialized tires. I have several wheels built with Duster rims with factory tubeless rimstrip and valve. And I have the one TN 719 that I set up with the yellow Stan's rim tape and some stems that were shipping in the owner's manual bag of Specialized bikes a couple years ago. I have never had any trouble getting them to mount right up. The Duster rims are tight, and I've had to put some huge pressure in a couple tires to get them to seat (part of the bead will be buried into the spoke bed and will only pop into place so that the tire is aligned properly after putting over 60 PSI into them).

    If you get low pressure and unseat a tire out on the trail, it's often difficult or impossible to get it to re-seat. CO2 will usually do it, but if you have spilled out any of the sealant it probably will lose air again.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  22. #22
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    Mtn Goat showed me these. I ripped a sidewall on my first ride and repaired it at home and was able to ride the tire until it wore out. Worth every penny!!!!

    Amazon.com: Radial Tire Patch Kit: Automotive

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrniceguy42 View Post
    How extensively have you tried tubeless? I ride 5x a week and also ride DH laps on my trail bike, I never get pinch flats and change tires (rear is an XC/AM tire, not DH) about every 6 months. Tubeless is the answer for the rocky, haggard terrain of CO.

    Gorilla tape = $3
    Stans sealant = $15
    You forgot valves...unless you're cutting apart a tube.
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
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  24. #24
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    Tubeless has made riding much more hastle-free IMHO. I haven't flatted in like 6 months and I ride 4-5 times a week.
    I'm bored and at work or else I would be riding

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Trucker View Post
    Question for ya: did this happen yesterday 7/30 ? If so, what time were you riding?
    Yesterday morning around 6:30am.

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