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  1. #1
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    Anyone else hear the bicycle rant on 105.9 this morning?

    WTF??? Did any of you hear the "Intelligent Talk with Howie" segment on FM105.9 this morning? I only caught the last half of it or so, but the basis of the discussion was whether or not cyclists should be allowed on (busy) roadways. I will acknowledge that there are far too many ignorant cyclists out there who feel that they "own the road" and wrongly ignore all traffic laws and other drivers, but Howie actually was making jokes about 'wiping cyclists off the road' with cars and that hitting one would earn you '20 points'!! I'm all for humor and all, but suggesting that hitting someone on a bike is in any way ok is simply not acceptable. Haven't other radio DJs gotten fired over these sorts of things???

  2. #2
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    I didn't hear it, but damn that chaps me. I went to their website to see if I could hear it, but I could just find streaming. I sent the morning show a short but firey email, and would encourage others to do the same.
    Have at em.... TheAliceMorningShow@alice1059.com
    I really identify with you...SO MUCH.

    "Feelin stupid? I know I am."
    "You just have to forget everything you know about gravity."
    H. Simpson

  3. #3
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    I believe they are owned by Clear Channel. Clear Channel has been in all kinds of hot water about this same thing on the east coast and down south. DJ's have been fired. What needs to be done is to contact Bicycle Colorado and then request transcripts of the radio show. Contact management at Alice....this is BOLLSHIT!!!!!!!!!

    As a tax payer and a commuter, I have the right to be on the road. I also have to follow all traffic rules of the road.

    Grass roots campaign to get this guy fired......Now I know why I dont listen to Alice
    Proud Tribe member since 1992 - looking for better singletrack to be ridden year round

  4. #4
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    Maybe a biker should have to have a licence and insurance for the PRIVILAGE to use the roadways.

    Driving is not a right, it is a privilage. It shouldn't be any different for bikers.

  5. #5
    Your bike sucks
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    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    Maybe a biker should have to have a licence and insurance for the PRIVILAGE to use the roadways.

    Driving is not a right, it is a privilage. It shouldn't be any different for bikers.
    Heck yeah. Don't forget walkers. They need their walking license if they want the privilege of using public throughways. Rollerbladers, cyclists, skateboards, joggers - -pffft - where do they get off using public lands for transportation without their papers? Don't like it? Stay home and starve. Don't forget our nation was founded on the idea that every citizen needs a license and insurance before setting foot on public roadways. It's the American way
    Last edited by Carl Mega; 04-18-2006 at 12:11 PM.

  6. #6
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    You don't have to like it, but driving isn't a right on the public roadways. Biking on them is not a right either.

  7. #7
    Your bike sucks
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    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    Biking on them is not a right either.
    How does one earn this privilege? Prove your point. I don't think you can.
    Last edited by Carl Mega; 04-18-2006 at 12:11 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    You don't have to like it, but driving isn't a right on the public roadways. Biking on them is not a right either.
    We should have licenses for trails, too. And insurance. Different licenses for different land managers at that. Come to think of it, we should just not worry about it and sell the forest. heh heh
    Redstone Cyclery
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  9. #9
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    Right to Ride on Road

    While driving a car is a privilege that requires a license and insurance, riding a bike on the roads curently does not. Having insurance and getting a license makes sense for cars, which are very large, attain great speeds and thus can hurt other people and property if not driven properly. Chances are that when riding a bike, poor handling will only hurt the person riding the bike. I believe in this case our government has wisely decided NOT to create regulations to protect people from their own stupidity (riding a bike recklessly on public roads, not wearing a helmet, etc.). As mentioned, bicyclists still must adhere to the rules of the road. Perhaps DamoNNomaD's frustration comes from riders who do not obey the rules and law enforcement that does not enforce the rules on bicyclists. However, none of this renders acceptable what the morning DJ apparently said. That sounds like it was just mean-spirited.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Mega
    How does one earn this privilege? Prove your point. I don't think you can.
    If indeed it was treated that way, bikers would have to pass a written and a course test to earn the privilage.

    There is nothing to prove.

  11. #11
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by angryasian
    "Intelligent Talk ... on FM105.9"
    isn't this an oxymoron?
    -
    .And following our will and wind . . .
    . . .We'll ride the spiral to the end
    and may just go where no one's been.

  12. #12
    Your bike sucks
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    Huh? Then why did you write this...."You don't have to like it, but driving isn't a right on the public roadways. Biking on them is not a right either." Now you contradict yourself? Strange indeed!

    Rights are inherent. Privileges are given. Cycling on public roadways falls under "rights to use". Like all other rights it (public use) is restricted by laws and has boundaries.
    Driving a motor vehicle typically falls under privilege - it is granted. However, some libertarians have challenged this take and have even won a few court cases in support of it being a right under certain circumstances. Don't try and cite this if you get pulled over without a license though.

  13. #13
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    Carl-

    The fact that biking on roadways could be regulated through a greasy ease of lubed legislation is what makes it a privilage to me... and the fact is that it IS regulated and mostly PROHIBITED. It is a privilage that one does NOT have to take a test and get a license to ride on the roads that ARE legal to ride on.

    If riding your bike on the roadways is your "inherent right", then why don't you pop out onto Interstate 70 and see how long it takes for the highway patrol to show up and haul your butt away... with a heavy fine. Biking on public roads may seem like a "inherent right" in your little world, but not in the grand scheme of the system. In that system they are all but ostracized. Indeed a privilage at this point.

  14. #14
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    So I have called Alice to get a transcript of the show and had to leave a message with thier control dept. Dont really expect to hear back from them.

    I then called Bicycle Colorado and wanted to know what can be done. The nice lady that answered the phone had received many calls about this and they were also looking for a transcript of the show. They will be able to get something done.

    I have a right to complain, but they were all out of license's at the time.
    Proud Tribe member since 1992 - looking for better singletrack to be ridden year round

  15. #15
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    DamoNNomaD,
    Actually you can ride on I-70. You can ride between Genesse and Evergreen Parkway, Georgetown and Loveland Pass, and there are other spaces between Vail and Glenwood Springs.

    Plenty of places to do what you say you cant......
    Proud Tribe member since 1992 - looking for better singletrack to be ridden year round

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by yetirich
    DamoNNomaD,
    Actually you can ride on I-70. You can ride between Genesse and Evergreen Parkway, Georgetown and Loveland Pass, and there are other spaces between Vail and Glenwood Springs.

    Plenty of places to do what you say you cant......
    And even more where you can't!



    I-70 is an INTERSTATE highway. So you can ride on bits of it? It is still regulated and most of it is NOT open to bikes NO MATTER WHAT. It is not a privilage. It is not a right. It is ILLEGAL.

    It would be pretty suicidal to leave Glenwood Springs on I-70 towards Vail on a bike, not to mention TOTALLY illegal. If it is not open to the public on bikes, then it is not a inherint right to ride bikes on the roads of America. The fact is that it is regulated and illegal on many roads. If one could ride on the roads, it would be a privilage not a right. THAT is the status and reality of riding bikes on public roads no matter what people have told others to believe.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ignazjr
    we should just not worry about it and sell the forest. heh heh
    You mean build schools and golf courses and stuff?
    Tony
    is making a comeback.

    Turns out that five years of not mountain biking, really makes one strive to get back to it.

  18. #18
    I meant to do that
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    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    Carl-

    The fact that biking on roadways could be regulated through a greasy ease of lubed legislation is what makes it a privilage to me... and the fact is that it IS regulated and mostly PROHIBITED. It is a privilage that one does NOT have to take a test and get a license to ride on the roads that ARE legal to ride on.

    If riding your bike on the roadways is your "inherent right", then why don't you pop out onto Interstate 70 and see how long it takes for the highway patrol to show up and haul your butt away... with a heavy fine. Biking on public roads may seem like a "inherent right" in your little world, but not in the grand scheme of the system. In that system they are all but ostracized. Indeed a privilage at this point.
    I actually saw a roadie out on one of our Interstate bypasses (which are illegal to cycle on) in full roadie regalia, headed straight for a very steep bridge, which has no break-down lane. One of the craziest things I've seen. The entrance ramp is clearly marked: No bicycles, no motorized scooters, no farm equipment, no motorized vehicles less than 5hp, etc.

  19. #19
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    I never could stand Alice and now I couldn't say I like it much more. I didn't hear the radio this morning, (thank God for KTCL for not having loud DJ's) and I completely agree that its wrong what they said. But the best thing to do is handle the manner in a civil way. I agree with Yetirich and him contacting Bicycle Colorado, these are the people who you want to handle these kind of matters.
    I can also say being a roadie and a mountain biker that there are roadies out there that don't respect the laws or others in general. Its best that we all educate ourselves so that safety comes first.
    No life is worth losing over simple measures that can be learned by all. Our roads are busy and they will continue to get busier. Why take unwarranted risk??
    I hope that the DJ learns a lesson but I also hope that people don't encourage this kind of behavior for the young out there.
    Ride Fast, Take Chances!

  20. #20
    pin 'er up
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    Quote Originally Posted by DamoNNomaD
    You don't have to like it, but driving isn't a right on the public roadways. Biking on them is not a right either.
    Get over yourself!! Then add chlorine to your gene pool!! Nancy!!
    miSSionary
    Black Sheep...where it'ss at!!
    "I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays." LA

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by miSSionary
    Get over yourself!! Then add chlorine to your gene pool!! Nancy!!
    miSSionary
    I'm sorry you have trouble with facts. That is what happens when you have been told lies about the subject matter your entire life. Now you refuse the truth.

    It doesn't have anything to do with me.

    Riding bikes on roads is a privilage that can be snapped away at virtually anytime for any reason. Driving is also a privilage. There are regulations on both that don't make them inherint rights by nature.

    These are facts. If you feel you disagree with that, then please address it. There is no reason to attack me because you feel uncomfortable with the truth. I can handle it though. You obviously need someone to project on until you think about it.

  22. #22
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    I need to do some research first but wasn't something passed in the past few months that allowed bikers to use a full 1/3 of the road way and not be relegated to the gutter? It also went through with the change to allow a right turn signal by a biker to be a point to the right with the right hand and not the left hand up?

    Correct me if I am wrong and from earlier posts I am sure someone will, but aren't bikes not allowed on SIDEWALKS?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Daddy
    I need to do some research first but wasn't something passed in the past few months that allowed bikers to use a full 1/3 of the road way and not be relegated to the gutter? It also went through with the change to allow a right turn signal by a biker to be a point to the right with the right hand and not the left hand up?

    Correct me if I am wrong and from earlier posts I am sure someone will, but aren't bikes not allowed on SIDEWALKS?
    Bikes are indeed illegal on most city sidewalks.

  24. #24
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    Statute regarding operation of a bicycle in Colorado

    http://bicyclecolo.org/page.cfm?PageID=45

    Just an interesting read . . .

  25. #25
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    Maybe someone should site the actual law...

    ...instead of pulling half baked information out of their a$$. It took me all of 3 minutes to find.

    from Colorado Statutes : TITLE 42 VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC : REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC : ARTICLE 4 REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC : PART 14 OTHER OFFENSES : 42-4-1412. Operation of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles.

    Operation of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles

    (1) Every person riding a bicycle shall have all of the rights and duties applicable to the driver of any other vehicle under this article, except as to special regulations in this article and except as to those provisions which by their nature can have no application. Said riders shall comply with the rules set forth in this section and section 42-4-221, and when using streets and highways within incorporated cities and towns, shall be subject to local ordinances regulating the operation of bicycles as provided in section 42-4-111.

    (2) It is the intent of the general assembly that nothing contained in House Bill No. 1246, enacted at the second regular session of the fifty-sixth general assembly, shall in any way be construed to modify or increase the duty of the department of transportation or any political subdivision to sign or maintain highways or sidewalks or to affect or increase the liability of the state of Colorado or any political subdivision under the "Colorado Governmental Immunity Act", article 10 of title 24, C.R.S.

    (3) No bicycle shall be used to carry more persons at one time than the number for which it is designed or equipped.

    (4) No person riding upon any bicycle shall attach the same or himself to any motor vehicle upon a roadway.

    (5) Any person riding a bicycle shall ride in the right-hand lane. When being overtaken by another vehicle, such person shall ride as close to the right-hand side as practicable. Where a paved shoulder suitable for bicycle riding is present, persons operating bicycles shall ride on the paved shoulder. These provisions shall apply, except under any of the following situations:
    (a) When overtaking and passing another bicycle or vehicle proceeding in the same direction;
    (b) When preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway;
    (c) When reasonably necessary to avoid hazardous conditions, including, but not limited to, fixed or moving objects, parked or moving vehicles, pedestrians, animals, or surface hazards.

    (6)(a) Persons operating bicycles on roadways shall ride single file; except that riding no more than two abreast is permitted in the following circumstances:
    (i)When riding two abreast will not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic; or
    (ii)When riding on paths or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles.
    (b) Persons riding two abreast shall ride within a single lane.

    (7) A person operating a bicycle shall keep at least one hand on the handlebars at all times.

    (8)(a) A person riding a bicycle intending to turn left shall follow a course described in sections 42-4-901 (1), 42-4-903, and 42-4-1007 or may make a left turn in the manner prescribed in paragraph (b) of this subsection (8).
    (b) A person riding a bicycle intending to turn left shall approach the turn as closely as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway. After proceeding across the intersecting roadway to the far corner of the curb or intersection of the roadway edges, the bicyclist shall stop, as much as practicable, out of the way of traffic. After stopping, the bicyclist shall yield to any traffic proceeding in either direction along the roadway the bicyclist had been using. After yielding and complying with any official traffic control device or police officer regulating traffic on the highway along which he intends to proceed, the bicyclist may proceed in the new direction.
    (c) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this subsection (8), the transportation commission and local authorities in their respective jurisdictions may cause official traffic control devices to be placed on roadways and thereby require and direct that a specific course be traveled.

    (9)(a) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection (9), every person riding a bicycle shall signal his intention to turn or stop in accordance with the provisions of section 42-4-903; except that a person riding a bicycle may signal a right turn with the right arm extended horizontally.
    (b) A signal of intention to turn right or left when required shall be given continuously during not less than the last one hundred feet traveled by the bicycle before turning and shall be given while the bicycle is stopped waiting to turn. A signal by hand and arm need not be given continuously if the hand is needed in the control or operation of the bicycle.

    (10)(a) A person riding a bicycle upon and along a sidewalk or pathway or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk shall yield the right-of-way to any pedestrian and shall give an audible signal before overtaking and passing such pedestrian. A person riding a bicycle in a crosswalk shall do so in a manner that is safe for pedestrians.
    (b) A person shall not ride a bicycle upon and along a sidewalk or pathway or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk where such use of bicycles is prohibited by official traffic control devices or local ordinances. A person riding a bicycle shall dismount before entering any crosswalk where required by official traffic control devices or local ordinances.
    (c) A person riding or walking a bicycle upon and along a sidewalk or pathway or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk shall have all the rights and duties applicable to a pedestrian under the same circumstances, including, but not limited to, the rights and duties granted and required by section 42-4-802.

    (11)(a) A person may park a bicycle on a sidewalk unless prohibited or restricted by an official traffic control device or local ordinance.
    (b) A bicycle parked on a sidewalk shall not impede the normal and reasonable movement of pedestrian or other traffic.
    (c) A bicycle may be parked on the road at any angle to the curb or edge of the road at any location where parking is allowed.
    (d) A bicycle may be parked on the road abreast of another bicycle or bicycles near the side of the road or any location where parking is allowed in such a manner as does not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic.
    (e) In all other respects, bicycles parked anywhere on a highway shall conform to the provisions of part 11 of this article regulating the parking of vehicles.

    (12)(a) Any person who violates any provision of this section commits a class 2 misdemeanor traffic offense; except that section 42-2-127 shall not apply.
    (b) Any person riding a bicycle who violates any provision of this article other than this section which is applicable to such a vehicle and for which a penalty is specified shall be subject to the same specified penalty as any other vehicle; except the section 42-2-127 shall not apply.

    (13) Upon request, the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction shall complete a report concerning an injury or death incident that involves a bicycle on the roadways of the state, even if such accident does not involve a motor vehicle.

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