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Thread: Air Compressor

  1. #1
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    Air Compressor

    Anyone have any recommendations on a decent air compressor that I'd be using primarily for tubeless maintenance?

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    If it will only be for tires and not paint or tools, low hp is alright. Tank size is more important. I would stay in the 20-30 gallon size with a good ball-valve shut off. Harbor Frieght sells a few decent bang-for-buck models depending on the price range.
    '93 Giant Sedona ATX custom
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    Quote Originally Posted by supersedona View Post
    If it will only be for tires and not paint or tools, low hp is alright. Tank size is more important. I would stay in the 20-30 gallon size with a good ball-valve shut off. Harbor Frieght sells a few decent bang-for-buck models depending on the price range.
    Size does matter. But holy crap, a 20-30 gallon just for tires?

    I paid around $75 for a consumer-quality compressor/tank combo at Home Despot. I think it's a 1-gallon. It's awesome for mounting tubeless bike tires, fine for my truck tires. I've even blown out my sprinkler system with it the last couple years (that takes some patience, but it works). Nice to have just to blow dust out of stuff and things like that too.

    If you aren't going to run a paint sprayer or other air tools I really don't see how you need to spend big dollars for a compressor.

    My $.02
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  4. #4
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    20+ gallons does seem like overkill for my needs, plus I'm looking for something on the smaller side and I'd like to keep it under $100 if possible. I'm just tired of blowing through CO2 canisters while maintaining a few bikes of my own, the girlfriends, and even some friends.

    Tom, did yours come with the necessary attachments for the tires/valves, or did you have to purchase them separately?
    Quote Originally Posted by BBW
    Its amazing how easy somebody can make 10.000 posts making such stupid comments.

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    I have a 2 gallon campbell hausfeld from walmart. It's totally fine for regular bike tires, but for my latest fat tire tubeless setup I was wishing for a little bigger tank. It still worked, I just had to go get a beer while it refilled the tank.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ebry74 View Post
    20+ gallons does seem like overkill for my needs, plus I'm looking for something on the smaller side and I'd like to keep it under $100 if possible. I'm just tired of blowing through CO2 canisters while maintaining a few bikes of my own, the girlfriends, and even some friends.

    Tom, did yours come with the necessary attachments for the tires/valves, or did you have to purchase them separately?
    As I recall, mine came with a thread-on schrader attachment, but I bought a quick coupler to install on the hose instead, then got a quick coupler schrader fitting, lock-on schrader (for the sprinkler system), and a blower.

    All that brass fitting stuff is pretty cheap. I think I got my compressor and all fittings for less than $100.

    Here's a fitting kit, everything you could ever want for $20:

    Air Compressor Starter Kit H-3863 - Uline

    Compressors are better for mounting tires not only because it's cheaper but because the CO2 blows too cold. It works, but it can cause problems.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by maddslacker View Post
    Good point, you probably aren't going to find many native presta fittings. I just keep one of these around:

    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddslacker View Post
    Thanks for sharing this DIY link. A trip to Harbor Freight might be in my near future. Those Presta/Schrader adaptors drive me nuts. It's probably just my mechanical ineptitude, but I have a hard time getting my compressor to blow a steady stream of air through the adaptor.

  10. #10
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    Thanks gents!
    Quote Originally Posted by BBW
    Its amazing how easy somebody can make 10.000 posts making such stupid comments.

  11. #11
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    I have a two gallon Husky from Home Depot. On my old DT rims I could never get a 2.4 Conti to seat on the front even after pulling the valve core. The 2.1 in the back was no problem. I would take a beer and go to the Midas and use theirs to seat the front. When I switched to Maxxis I never had a problem mounting the 2.4 upfront. The Maxxis on my Chargers are easy peasy lemon squeezy to mount.

    Just an FYI that results may vary depending on rubber and rim choice.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

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    Agreed it may be overkill, but I have had many gripes with stubborn units that were smaller. The cost margin of a 20 gal vs smaller is actually pretty minimal if you look around. Like with many things, bigger opens options for later.

    There is a company advertizing in Mountain Bike Action in one of the small ads in the back that makes a tire inflator attachment with a gun and guage for presta. If I could recall what it was called I would send a link, but its out there.
    '93 Giant Sedona ATX custom
    '93 Giant Sedona AtX aero-edition
    '73 Schwinn Suburban
    '95 Fuji Suncrest

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    I've got a 3 gallon Craftsman with an OILED air compressor piston. The oiled (vs. oil-less compressors) are much nicer, quieter and longer lasting.

    I'd sell mine for $75 (1 year old) as I need to get a larger capacity compressor for running air tools in the garage.

    PM me. I'm in Arvada.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hokiebrett View Post
    I've got a 3 gallon Craftsman with an OILED air compressor piston. The oiled (vs. oil-less compressors) are much nicer, quieter and longer lasting.

    I'd sell mine for $75 (1 year old) as I need to get a larger capacity compressor for running air tools in the garage.

    PM me. I'm in Arvada.
    That's a good deal. I went for the cheapo dry setup just because I couldn't justify paying enough for an oiled one. If you have an oiled one, oil it once in a while!
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  15. #15
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    I got the cheapest one I could find and I use it primarily for dealing with the tubeless. Honestly, i wish I would have spend the extra 20-$30 and gotten a little bit better one. Does it work? Yes, but it is noisy and runs out of air quickly..
    BBZ

    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy - Benjamin Franklin

  16. #16
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    Every person who does their own maintenance and has garage space should have a compressor in my humble opinion.

    I mounted mine in the attic space above the garage and it takes up no real estate. You'd be surprised at how many jobs are made easier or more pleasant with one.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by supersedona View Post
    Agreed it may be overkill, but I have had many gripes with stubborn units that were smaller. The cost margin of a 20 gal vs smaller is actually pretty minimal if you look around. Like with many things, bigger opens options for later.

    There is a company advertizing in Mountain Bike Action in one of the small ads in the back that makes a tire inflator attachment with a gun and guage for presta. If I could recall what it was called I would send a link, but its out there.
    AirBob? It might cost as much as a compressor, but it makes filling up presta and schrader valves fast and easy. I spent far too much time trying to trigger the little pin on my old compresser valve to fill up a presta tube through an adapter. Now it's a matter of a minute to air up the family's mixed-valved bikes. (Amazon.com: Problem Solvers Air-Bob Universal Tire Inflator: Sports & Outdoors)

  18. #18
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    I've considered a compressor, but it's easier to let me LBS do the initial set up for a few bucks and then use an injector for maintenance down the road.

    2oz Tire Sealant Injector
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debaser View Post
    I've considered a compressor, but it's easier to let me LBS do the initial set up for a few bucks and then use an injector for maintenance down the road.

    2oz Tire Sealant Injector
    Not a bad idea but you are one flat(that requires you to swap to a tube temporarily) away from having to hit the bike shop again. Air compressors really make life in the garage so much better. That injector is the tits though.

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    I have a 30 gallon air compressor, but I also have this (link below) 1.5 gallon craftsman that I used prior to getting the larger one. I bring this one to races all the time. It has worked wonderfully for 3+ years now without a hiccup. Seats every tubeless tire I've ever tried with it...on any rims that I've tried it on.

    Craftsman 1.5 Gallon Portable Air Compressor with Hose and 8PC Accessory Kit : Sears Outlet

  21. #21
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    Check the ads now that spring has sprung. I got a Porter Cable 1.5 gallon pancake compressor with a hose and finish gun at Home Depot a few years ago for a couple hundred bucks.
    Harbor Freight and air compressor should not be used in the same sentence. Some advice from friends....buy good tools so you don't need to buy them twice.
    you can get passed a dog... nobody fuks with a lion

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    Can anybody post some info on the exact model they got plus the attachment(s) that are required for bike tires? Sorry I am quite ignorant on power tools and the like, and the reference to 1 or 3 or 20 gallon compressors without more info is pretty confusing. It would be a real hassle to have to take a bike to the shop just to install a tire. Or put some more sealant in the tire.

    I appreciate the reference to the Sears Air Compressor, that was helpful. Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy View Post
    Can anybody post some info on the exact model they got plus the attachment(s) that are required for bike tires? Sorry I am quite ignorant on power tools and the like, and the reference to 1 or 3 or 20 gallon compressors without more info is pretty confusing. It would be a real hassle to have to take a bike to the shop just to install a tire. Or put some more sealant in the tire.

    I appreciate the reference to the Sears Air Compressor, that was helpful. Thanks!
    Buy this one. It's on sale for $99. Oiled compressor, 3 gallon tank. 1hp motor for quick recharge.

    It's the one I had

    Sears.com

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debaser View Post
    I've considered a compressor, but it's easier to let me LBS do the initial set up for a few bucks and then use an injector for maintenance down the road.

    2oz Tire Sealant Injector
    I also have this tire selant injector and find it very useful. Seat the bead, remove valve stem and install sealant.

    I like to separate seating the bead and sealant as I don't like the chances of having a suspended medium in the tire while I'm hitting it with high pressure air. Ask anyone who has put the sealant in first and had the bead blow off the rim while trying to seat it... It sounds like 12ga shotgun and the sealant goes everywhere!

    Which brings me to my second point. When seating tubeless tires (or working with an air compressor or pressurized medium in general)... COVER YOUR EYES. PERIOD. Safety glasses, riding glasses, ski goggles... I don't care. God only gave you two eyes.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy View Post
    Can anybody post some info on the exact model they got plus the attachment(s) that are required for bike tires? Sorry I am quite ignorant on power tools and the like, and the reference to 1 or 3 or 20 gallon compressors without more info is pretty confusing. It would be a real hassle to have to take a bike to the shop just to install a tire. Or put some more sealant in the tire.

    I appreciate the reference to the Sears Air Compressor, that was helpful. Thanks!

    Depends on your budget.

    I have this 3G which has worked for fine for me.
    3-Gallon Portable Air Compressor

    and I also have a 20G... for working on my truck, house, etc...
    20 Gallon Vertical Air Compressor


    You can make the pump head yourself with this:
    Silca Pump Head

    a short piece of old hand pump tubing.....

    and this
    Craftsman 11 pc. Air Compressor Accessory Kit


    or buy this one:
    Prestacycle Prestaflator Deluxe with Presta Head


    more small parts

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