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  1. #1
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    2010 Stumpy Expert

    Alright, alright so I don't even get the bike for 2 more weeks and I'm already looking at what I could replace on it. Not really a weight weenie but I'm curious to hear from you all out there who are a bit more tech savvy than I about what parts you would replace from stock to save a bit of weight. Any stock parts on a Specialized that you don't like in general and would choose to replace?

    Bored on a Sunday evening and figured I'd throw it out there. Here's a link to what comes stock on it.

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...enuItemId=9248

  2. #2
    Rigid in Evergreen
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    The only thing that stands out to me are the cranks, but I wouldn't be in a hurry to replace them.. just ride it hard for a while and see what breaks first.

    And the integrated headset virus has spread to mountain bikes?

  3. #3
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    If this was my bike...

    Standard upgrades:
    -Swap the cassette for XT/XTR
    -Lose that big front rotor and scoot down to something smaller. Those Elixirs will slow ya down plenty already.
    -Lose the cranks for SLX/XT/XTR
    -You could probably save 80-100 grams on a Ti railed saddle. Just remember, a really light saddle can bite you in the ass... literally.

    Other non-weight saving upgrades:
    -Get some strips for those wheels and run that **** tubeless (beware of the thin specialized sidewall)
    -Buy a bar that's an appropriate width. 660mm?! Why own such a nice bike if you can't control it due to such a narrow ass bar?

  4. #4
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    Appreciate the replies guys. Yeah, the cranks had me a bit nervous, but coming from an Enduro this bike feels like a feather already. Good call on the tubeless for sure. Probably one of the first things I do. Sorry for the ignorance, but can I keep the same rims for an easy conversion or would I need to go ghetto tubeless with that setup?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by fredbohm
    Not really a weight weenie but I'm curious to hear from you all out there who are a bit more tech savvy than I about what parts you would replace from stock to save a bit of weight.
    So, you dropped around 3k on a bike and want to upgrade to save weight, but you're not a weight weenie??!!

    Embrace the truth, brother, embrace the truth!
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  6. #6
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    Just curious,

    What made you go with stumpy?

    The first thing I would go with is a different wheelset. I can't believe those crank scome on a $3300 bike. Seems the part spec is very low for a bike of that money. They try to spruce it up by giving you a XO derailleur.

    Erik

  7. #7
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    Ha! Yeah, I'm probably a bit in denial. Mostly talk though, doubt I'll pull the trigger on buying much more than a wheelset. But over long term who knows. As for going with a stumpy, just kinda partial to Specialized.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fredbohm
    Ha! Yeah, I'm probably a bit in denial. Mostly talk though, doubt I'll pull the trigger on buying much more than a wheelset. But over long term who knows. As for going with a stumpy, just kinda partial to Specialized.
    This is what you get for around that price in a Giant:

    http://giant-bicycles.com/en-US/bike...x1/3897/37063/

    Pretty much full XT (XTR cassette).


  9. #9
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    Meh, the bike's got a pretty nice wheelset on it. To build a nicer lighter wheel would cost you $$$. I'd run those wheels til they die.

    As far as wanting to change parts, don't listen to the others. I've bought bikes everywhere from $500 to $7000 in value and I always end up changing probably half the parts either to save weight, add stiffness, or just make it the way I want it. If you ask me, the small amount of changes I would make on that bike is on the low end of the spectrum.

    And the Giant... Nice bike, but god I hate that XT der and shifters and the 68.5 degree head angle on the Stumpy will ride better in a trail application anyway. I'd still take the stumpy personally. Oh and the Giant doesn't come with a Talas fork. At best it's six in one hand, one half dozen in the other.

    I wouldn't worry too much about it man, you bought a good bike.

  10. #10
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    Well, the Color alone is boring... There are already too many ninja black wanna-be's out there... I own 3 black bikes, and my ninja skillz haven't gotten any better. In fact, my Indian turquoise loud Team Yeti colors have increased my skill level... Perhaps neon pink would take me into true jedi levels. If you sand the frame down, you'll have significant weight savings.

    The slower option is to just ride the piss out of it. All the bug splats and dirt clods you'll hit will naturally buff the paint off. Until its all off, you'll have the aerodynamics of a golf ball, which may make you fly farther.

    The more you ride, the more wear you'll have on the parts.... thus less material. Be sure to be kind to the environment and pick up the shavings you left behind.

    On a serious note, The only think I'd change is the spoke nipples. Aluminum spoke nipples are useless when it comes to truing a wheel... feggers crack and fail...

    Oh, a bell might be a nice touch... but get a titanium one.

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  11. #11
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndecentExposure
    Well, the Color alone is boring... There are already too many ninja black wanna-be's out there... I own 3 black bikes, and my ninja skillz haven't gotten any better. In fact, my Indian turquoise loud Team Yeti colors have increased my skill level... Perhaps neon pink would take me into true jedi levels. If you sand the frame down, you'll have significant weight savings.

    The slower option is to just ride the piss out of it. All the bug splats and dirt clods you'll hit will naturally buff the paint off. Until its all off, you'll have the aerodynamics of a golf ball, which may make you fly farther.

    The more you ride, the more wear you'll have on the parts.... thus less material. Be sure to be kind to the environment and pick up the shavings you left behind.

    On a serious note, The only think I'd change is the spoke nipples. Aluminum spoke nipples are useless when it comes to truing a wheel... feggers crack and fail...

    Oh, a bell might be a nice touch... but get a titanium one.

    IE for the win.

  12. #12
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    Stumpy is a great bike, I've got an 09 elite. Only upgrade I made was throwing on a wheelset I already had, and got a profesional bike fit.

    The bike fit will save you from going through the buy, try, buy cycle for bars, stems, and seats, which in the long run saves you money. More confortiable too. My writs, back, and knees never felt so good, and my spinning technique is better now that I've got my weight proply supported.

    After that, could go tubeless if you want with the rim strips. Could slap on your favorate tires.

    Stock components are holding up great. Rock the dirve line and brakes you've got until something breaks, then upgrade if you need to. Current spec should be just fine though.

    Long term upgrades - wait until the anual service is due for the suspention and send your fork to PUSH to get their tuning and a blow off put in. Could also pick up an RP3 and have them custom tune the rear for you.

    Mostly, just ride the **** out of your new bike.

  13. #13
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    Nice bike. The best weight savings I have ever made to my bikes were starting with my gut.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mateomtb
    Nice bike. The best weight savings I have ever made to my bikes were starting with my gut.
    But that takes an actual effort, lightening the bike just takes opening the wallet.



    *Neither of which happens in my world.
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  15. #15
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    140mm travel and QR front/rear?, tsk tsk

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bngofast
    If this was my bike...

    Standard upgrades:
    -Swap the cassette for XT/XTR
    -Lose that big front rotor and scoot down to something smaller. Those Elixirs will slow ya down plenty already.
    -Lose the cranks for SLX/XT/XTR
    -You could probably save 80-100 grams on a Ti railed saddle. Just remember, a really light saddle can bite you in the ass... literally.
    here's a cheaper version that Bngo mentions

    -Remove cogs you don't want or use... lighter, cheaper
    -Drill more holes in area's you don't care about. Be careful doing this, rain may get in.
    -lose the seat altogether. The more you standup, the faster you'll go. now you just saved a seat & a seatpost, and its lighter than the local XC ti or carbon.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fredbohm

    Bored on a Sunday evening and figured I'd throw it out there. Here's a link to what comes stock on it.

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...enuItemId=9248
    1. Tubeless and lighter wheelset. You can pick up a set of Crossmax XLs on ebay or CL for $350ish.

    2. Wider bar, carbon. Easton - $75 on ebay.

    3. Ti railed seat

    4. XTR cassette

    5. XT crank

    6. Sell the bike after a year and buy a 5 Spot.

    Items 1 and 2 will change the ride - do them now.

    The rest can wait till you wear them out.

  18. #18
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    Have you thought of drilling holes in everything?
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  19. #19
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    No I'm actually going to go with the no bike method. They're way lighter that way. I figure if I spend more time on this forum and less actually riding, then I will know more about how to talk about bikes and give my wicked awesome advice to others that ask it.

    Otherwise... good call on the bar and wheelset advice, that will probably be the first things that I do. I'm sure some of these things will become more obvious as I put some miles down on the new bike. Thanks for the feedback guys.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by fredbohm
    No I'm actually going to go with the no bike method. They're way lighter that way. I figure if I spend more time on this forum and less actually riding, then I will know more about how to talk about bikes and give my wicked awesome advice to others that ask it.

    Otherwise... good call on the bar and wheelset advice, that will probably be the first things that I do. I'm sure some of these things will become more obvious as I put some miles down on the new bike. Thanks for the feedback guys.
    We're just playing with ya.

    All idea's are good. Besides, you can't have too many extra wheelsets! Build up a light weight set with skinnier tires and let'er rip!
    Golden Bike Park Group

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