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  1. #1
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    2008 Leadville 100

    Can anyone tell me how the registration works? Can I apply online or do they mail out forms? We have a team of 6 guys from the midwest looking to try our luck and lungs out...

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by MPowelka
    Can anyone tell me how the registration works? Can I apply online or do they mail out forms? We have a team of 6 guys from the midwest looking to try our luck and lungs out...
    They hand deliver the entries along with a 12 pack of Fat Tire, a genuine gold nugget and a $300 check just for entering. I just got mine yesterday.

    If you don't believe me, you might want to check http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/ for more info.

  3. #3
    skillz to pay billz
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    Quote Originally Posted by yosh
    They hand deliver the entries along with a 12 pack of Fat Tire, a genuine gold nugget and a $300 check just for entering. I just got mine yesterday.

    If you don't believe me, you might want to check http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/ for more info.

    the quote button is fun

  4. #4
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    It's a lotto system. You send in your entry and hope they pick yours. It isn't really a team event though. You are allowed to send in your entry with 5 others which just makes it an all-or-none deal. Either you're in with your buddies or you're all out. Entries will come out in January-ish and will be due February-ish.
    **** censorship

  5. #5
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    Anyone know what exactly you get for paying the registration fee, besides being able to ride thru private property? I went and watched a little bit of it last year and really doesn't look too costly to put on, appeared that most of the workers were volunteers, aid stations were not impressive at all, no hired rent-o-cops as there are usually at some organized rides I've been on. I've ridden further for 1/2 the price the Triple Bypass for instance. Do you at least get a jersey? Their website is not very informative. Just wondering, thanks!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by co_biker
    Anyone know what exactly you get for paying the registration fee, besides being able to ride thru private property?

    From the website:

    Race mementos and t-shirts to all entrants. Under 9 hours handcrafted gold and silver trophy belt buckle, under 12 hours handcrafted silver belt buckle. A medal to all finishers and a hooded sweatshirt to finishers under 12 hours. Fantastic awards for gender and age group top finishers. Unique ore cart trophy to the first male and female finisher. Awards ceremony Sunday.



    I'm not too picky, but the t-shirt / hooded sweatshirt designs are pretty ugly. That's just my opinion, and you may love them, but my t-shirts went straight to the bike rag bin. The buckle is a fantastic prize, though. Original, thoughtful, and give you instant cred with your fat tire homies.

    Yeah, it's definitely a very expensive race, and not a very good deal if you compare it to Laramie or the Firecracker, but part of what you pay for is the competition, and this race attracts some very, very, fast people.

  7. #7
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    Your money gets you into one of the last great races we are likely to see in our lifetime. Rare is such a race with such fame as to attract names like Wiens and Landis but still has hacks like you and I. Your money gets you the welcome arms of the whole town, a town which is well aware that these races are it's new economic lifeblood. It gets you and your crew into a spaghetti feed party without any stupid wristbands or proof- just walk in and enjoy the vibe. Last year there was a guy literally stuffing our pockets with Coors.
    So you don't get a jersey. Do we really need any more sublimated monstrosities to justify this race? IF you really do have the minerals for this race you get the buckle. The buckle says more than any billboard jersey does. I wear mine all the time, and on the odd occasion that my shirt slips up enough for someone to recognize it I can say with pride that I earned it.
    Your money buys you the chance to participate in a race that isn't about winning or beating the next guy. This is a race about proving to yourself that you can do it. About facing a great challenge and succeeding (or failing) and pushing to ones limits. The person that creeps up the boulevard at 11:59:59 is as great a success as Wiens and Landis. This is a race to discover amazing things about yourself and others.
    But then again... what am I saying? It is a lotto system.
    Do not enter this race. It is not worth it. You won't get a jersey. You might not even place in your age category. The weather is terrible and the people are mean.
    **** censorship

  8. #8
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    100 miles? phish...





    * actual size
    Last edited by nOOby; 11-20-2007 at 01:56 PM.

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    You're right co biker, the Leadville 100 bites.
    Where do I start? They made us wait in line for the spagetti dinner with beer. The swag bag, tee shirt, and poster were lame. They allowed local cops in a cruiser to set the pace at the start of the race and then had the State Patrol interferring with drivers at Twin Lakes. The staff at the aid stations were surly and didn't have the right color MM's. They only gave us a medal, buckle, and sweatshirt after we completed the event. The people of Leadville hate cyclists and never miss an opportunity to heckle a rider. Last but not least, the guy who founded the event, Ken Clouber, is a real prick. He kicked my dog and hit on my girlfriend while I was out racing. Save your money and skip the event.

  10. #10
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    I always laugh

    when people make statements like this about anything. I do it myself sometimes.

    Quote Originally Posted by co_biker
    really doesn't look too costly to put on
    Yes there are cheaper races. For that matter there are lots of free races. If you want a jersey just go buy one

    I can tell you there is nothing like coming across that finish line after what your body and mind has gone through over the course of a Leadville day. I have my buckle on every single day. It reminds me that I can rise above anything that life throws at me and kick it square in the nuts, and I need something to hold up my pants.

    Triple Bypass? It's not the same thing. It is however a good "warm up" for Leadville.

    The stuff you do get BTW is nice. Sweatshirt with your finishing time on the arm, long sleeve T, free food for you and your family/crew, and most of all the buckle. That's easily $100 worth of stuff. I have no problem with the race organizers making some money, I get paid when I go to work too.

  11. #11
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    12wheeler:
    I never said the ride bites, but possibly you're on the right track about the rest of your thoughts?
    sub:
    Landis? I really can't have respect for him, taking performance enhancing drugs just to pedal a bike is pretty ridiculous if you ask me. He probably competed just for a little publicity and to raise a little cash for his legal bills. Wiens is a different story his accomplishments are very impressive, unless he's on drugs too?
    mate:
    The Triple may be just a "warm up" but on a MTB it makes it a little more difficult, the Triple is not an "out and back" like the 100 is, I guess you can think of an "out and back" as half downhill.

    My main question was where does the entry fee $$ go? If no one knows the answer that's cool, no problem.
    Thanks for your responses!!

    Attached is a picture of Mr. Landis at the start of the race..... Hmm..
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by co_biker; 11-20-2007 at 09:49 PM.

  12. #12
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    So here's the real low down on this race...............

    The money /entrance fee goes to help organize the race and then some goes to a local childrens charity, so it's for a good cause.

    The course, isn't anything super tech, it's mainly boring a$$ fire-road or road there is not single track (that 10m going to the damn is not ST).

    The volunteers really are quite good and helpful, the aid stations are well stocked.

    The pre-race pasta dinner is excellent and the buckle is really a nice momento to remind you of what you did.

    What makes this race so hard - the god damn altitude or better put, the lack of oxygen up there. It's hard as hell if you've never been to that altitude and tried to really push yourself. At mile 40 you're basically in for a 10 mile climb, gaining 3,300+ ft, which can/is very demoralizing if you've never done it before, especially the 2 mile hike a bike - I REALLY wish they would reconsider moving the aid station to the first available area as for me pushing my bike is not why I ride and you push if you're not some of the first up cause the track is so gaddamn skinny that the riders coming down make it almost impossible to ride and pass people going up. Then at about mile 77 you've got one biatch of a 3 miles climb back up the Powerline, with grades reaching into the 20's.

    When you're done this race you will wonder how and why you did this to yourself and be amazed you could do it. It's not something I would do year after year, as the course itself doesn't impress me a whole lot (more for endurance than fun riding) but the initial challenge of completing it is momentous. I pulled out at mile 87 feeling like I could possibly die having a sever time breathing after P/line and the Sugar Loaf descent and will be going back next year to conquer this once and for all.


    Quote Originally Posted by co_biker
    12wheeler:
    I never said the ride bites, but possibly you're on the right track about the rest of your thoughts?
    sub:
    Landis? I really can't have respect for him, taking performance enhancing drugs just to pedal a bike is pretty ridiculous if you ask me. He probably competed just for a little publicity and to raise a little cash for his legal bills. Wiens is a different story his accomplishments are very impressive, unless he's on drugs too?
    mate:
    The Triple may be just a "warm up" but on a MTB it makes it a little more difficult, the Triple is not an "out and back" like the 100 is, I guess you can think of an "out and back" as half downhill.

    My main question was where does the entry fee $$ go? If no one knows the answer that's cool, no problem.
    Thanks for your responses!!

    Attached is a picture of Mr. Landis at the start of the race..... Hmm..
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
    MTB Barbados
    My Phantom pics

  13. #13
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    LyNx
    Thanks for the reply, that's what I was looking for.. Elevation is not that big of an issue for me, I ride at 9 to 10k all the time and I love climbing... Yes, I have heard that a lot of people "detonate" on the powerline portion of the ride, must be a killer!! I agree the fire road would be the boring part of the ride...
    Sorry about hi jacking the post...
    Thanks!!

  14. #14
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    Mateo

    Awesome post!! Have a great thanksgiving

  15. #15
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    I'll tell you what the entry fee gets you - 8 months of MOTIVATION. You'll feel guilty that you spent $200 on a race, you will start to care about that damn belt buckle, and you'll probably actually train for it and show up at the start line.

    Well worth it if you ask me.

  16. #16
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    Hey... think about this:

    Yeah, the race registration costs a lot, but it is far more expensive to produce than one might think. Among other things, your entry pays for: the hall where the pre/post race meetings happen, dozens of port-o-pots, insurance, Forest Service permits, town service permits, all that food at the aid stations, the police and paramedics waiting in the wings, the dinner, the sound system and setup at the finish, the awards (far more than buckles, hoodies, and medals to finishers, but trophy buckles to sub-9'ers, jackets to 1000 milers, Lead man/woman awards, etc), race registration office/staff, etc, etc, etc. Left over proceeds go to charities for family assistance and scholorships for local kids.

    Anyone who has ridden this race knows the experience is far more emotional and gratifying than the Tripple or other rides. I've spun through dozens of organized centuries and felt nothing special at the end of the day. But crossing the finish of Leadville and hearing your name announced over the PA is nothing short of amazing; it seperates those who've done it from those who haven't.

    Yeah, I live at 8,000 and frequently ride to 12,000'+ in the summer and love climbing, but so what? It's still a monster course and much more difficult than simply spinning on Forest Service roads. And, yeah, there are tougher races, but this one is THE legend, the one couch dwelling tv-heads know, and bragging rights are fairly earned by all finishers.

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