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  1. #1
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    Wheel help for a BIG guy (350+)

    A good friend I work with is about to start cycling with me. I am a clyde myself, but I am around 250 - 260. I run Sunringle MTX 33's. What wheel can hold a 350ish guy?
    Thanks in advance for ANY help

  2. #2
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    I weigh in at about 315 fully loaded with gear and I am riding on Sun Ringle EQ 31 36h laced to Hope Pro 2 hubs. I haven't been able to get them out of true yet.

  3. #3
    Big Test Icycles
    Reputation: Hangtime's Avatar
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    I'd look at a custom wheel. Hope Pro II Hubs and Mavic 729 rims. 20mm up front and bolt in the back.

  4. #4
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    about 315 here, I'm running the MTX 33's in the 29er persuasion and so far they've been bomb proof.

  5. #5
    Former Bike Wrench
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    36h Sun MTX39 with DT Alpine spokes. Hadley or King (with steel driveshell) would be the most durable hubs but expensive. Hope Pro II would be a more economical choice but I'd want the steel driveshell which ups their price to about the same as the Hadleys.

  6. #6
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    For that kind of strength, who built your wheel matters more than the components. First step is finding a wheelbuilder with some experience building clyde wheels.


    I'd go "custom", 36 spokes, whatever rims, alpine 3 spokes are probably worth the upgrade, I think I'd use a Shimano hub because they are cheap, and have a steel freehub that's easy to replace (and readily available).
    I'd guess a 350# guy who starts riding isn't going to stay 350# for long, so I'd be reluctant to spend a ton on a wheel.

  7. #7
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    Stay away from shimano. You will break the freehub. I would recommend nothing less than a Hope rear hub. DT Swiss and Chris King would work great but very spendy.

  8. #8
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    I'd tend to agree with the exception of the Saint hubs, but they are up in the Hope Pro II price range.

  9. #9
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    I'm around 330 and I've now blown 2 shimano rear hubs on my Fisher 29er in the last year. I plan on building some wheels with King hubs, Stan's Flow rims, 36 hole for the back and 32 up front. Lbs guy told me the stainless Hope hubs would work too, but I'm going to drop the dough for King's.

  10. #10
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    As inferred before, the build is the most important part of a wheel build. Hand built by someone who knows what they are doing and will take the time necessary will result in a strong build. There are some very narrow/light rims that will hold up to abuse, even from a 300+, if they are built well.

    As far as wheel components, you should use high quality if the funds allow. I will add the Mavic EX721 to the recommendations. Decent weight and strong. For his weight, 36 hole would be best, but 32 will work. Straight gauge or butted spokes--you will get a bunch of opinions here. I always use straight gauge because I think they flex less (I hate to feel the wheel flex). If think tubeless, EX823 would be the one. These would not only be good for a 300+ beginner, but would be good as he loses weight and starts riding more technical.

    Probably the best rear hub for your friend is Hadley in the 36pt. Very good reputation. I have found front hubs not as much concern as rear hubs, so you have a lot to choose from.

    A lot of this depends on available funds of course. It is tough to justify the high cost of a good wheel when you are just beginning, but if he (and you) thinks he will stay with it, it will pay for itself in the long run. But if need to spend less money, then maybe a Mavic 321 or 521, and Hope hubs.

  11. #11
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    I have been ridding on ryno lite rims, laced with phil wood 36 hole hubs that were for a tandem real sealed cartridge bearings, no some axle with loose bearings in grease. and 14 gauge spokes. yes it cost lawts of money, and yes it's heavy but wheels have stayed true for years and hubs are happy, smooth and run like a champ. I did do some searching in my area and found a bike builder that is a 1 man operation and a great wheel builder. cross lacing the spokes he told me helps in strength.

  12. #12
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    I have a dumb question. How do you know if you have damaged your rear hub. Im 280lbs and have been rocking the stock rear hubs on my three rigs and i think they have held up well. should i be checking it somehow.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigE610 View Post
    I have a dumb question. How do you know if you have damaged your rear hub. Im 280lbs and have been rocking the stock rear hubs on my three rigs and i think they have held up well. should i be checking it somehow.
    Check for any cracks and that the freehub and bearings are working smoothly. If you damage it you will know it on the trail.

  14. #14
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    you'll know because it noisy and hard too pedal and when you try and free wheel your chain will flop down, excessive play. of in my case...grind,grind,grind.....snap. axle and free hub.

  15. #15
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    36h Mavic 823s with Hope2 hubs, love them! I am 350lbs and ride pretty hard....

  16. #16
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    I was thinking Mavic 719's may hold up. What say you guys?

    Thanks soo much for the help guys

  17. #17
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    Well, the 519s (precursor to 719s) that were on my xc hardtail lasted a long time, even at my max weight of 290lbs. After about 5 or 6 years, and starting to jump off bigger stuff, some of the rear wheel spokes started loosening on every ride, so it was time for rebuild. Because I use tubeless now, I built the new wheel with a 819, which is working great.

    Not certain about longevity of the 719 for a 300+ lb rider, so I will let those big boys chime in here more.

  18. #18
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    When looking at components for a big boy wheel build, how does the type of riding you're doing factor in?

    I'm 220 lbs. and I ride in the city almost exclusively, and while I'm not doing HUGE drops or rolling over roots and rocks, I do ride pretty aggressively and run into all manner of potholes, multi-stair drops, curbs, and (my favorite) century old cobblestone streets (think of it as "urban all-mountain" riding). My rear wheel gets wrecked pretty much on a weekly basis now, and while I'm not exactly rolling in cash, I want to make sure I'm spending money on the parts that count before getting a wheel custom built.

    Obviously I need the wheel to handle the abuse in stride, but does the type of riding I'm doing call for different parts than someone who is doing, say, a regular single track circuit? Does the fact that I roll on relatively thin street slick tires make a difference? The terrain is pretty flat, so I'm more concerned with strength than weight at this point...and I'm pretty darn poor, so cost is a factor as well.

    Anyone with knowledge or experience with my style of riding who can recommend some components is welcome. Also, any shout outs for good, affordable wheel builders in NYC would be sweet.

  19. #19
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    I agree with most of what's been stated so far:
    - go with 36 hole rims
    - CK / Hope are preferred hubs
    - get a wheel builder experienced with clydes

    My $.02, the CK / Hope stuff really is WORTH the coin. If you're on a budget, then get the rear wheel first.

    NYC, you answered all your own questions. You are just abusing your equipment. Nothing is really made for your urban assault style of riding. Under your riding conditions, most equipment is subject to failure.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jason333 View Post
    I was thinking Mavic 719's may hold up. What say you guys?

    Thanks soo much for the help guys
    I have been through many wheels at 350+ I would buy the 823s and ride then and not look back. I now have 2 sets that I keep with different tire combos, i love these wheels!

  21. #21
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    how many of you 300+ pounders have custom built wheels? Also, was the outcome less or more expensive than outfits in previous posts (i.e. Mavic, Sun Ringle, Hope Pro 2, Stans ...etc.)?

  22. #22
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    yes custom wheels are a must and so is a good builder. I have sun ringle ryno lite dh with 14 gauge spokes and 36 hold phil wood hubs that are built for a tandem. same hubs and spokes on my fat tired surly pugsley.....

  23. #23
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    I am about 315 and I have Sun Rhyno Lite wheels with XT hubs. I bought them after I moved to Pittsburgh where the trails were a lot rougher than NC about 6 years ago and got sick of truing my rear rim after each ride on my GF hardtail. They were under $200 and have held up great. I now run them on my GF Cake and only seem to have to true them once a year or so.

  24. #24
    native.
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    +1 on the Rhyno Lites with XT hubs, those are probably the only set of off the shelf wheels that have held up with singletrack as well as urban riding. Other wheels that were custom built for me are 36h Phil Wood K.I.S.S. hubs laced to 700c Rhyno Lites and 32h Hope Pro 2 hubs laced again to 26" Rhyno Lites.

  25. #25
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    im in the same boat im almost 300 pounds whats a quality budget 10 speed cassette and hub combo?

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