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  1. #1
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    What's A Good Clydesdale Bike to Purchase?

    I am new to this forum and wanted to say hi. I'm looking at getting back into mountain biking since being out of it for about 17 years. I am quite a few pounds heavier now (340 lbs)but still 6'3" tall. My last bike was a 1997 Giant ATX 890, but no longer have it and no longer 205 pounds. Since the glory days, I have had lower back surgery and left wrist surgery as well. Now, my wife and kids (8 yrs old and 10 yrs old) want all of us to get bikes to ride together, so I have been looking a little bit. The Specialized Fuse Comp and the Specialized Rockhopper Pro are the two bikes that stand out to me right now. I haven't ridden either one yet, but wanted to get opinions on what bike you all think would be better for me. Dirt roads and a little single track are probably the type of riding we would be doing until I drop 100+ pounds!

  2. #2
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    Steel frame. And there is nothing wrong with steel.

  3. #3
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    Congrats on taking the steps to change your life, cycling is a great way to go about it too! I was 305 in October, 254.2 this morning. I started off riding my 17 year old Trek 4500 and this week started riding a 2017 Diamondback Atroz Comp. It is a very solid bike and my lower back is really loving the full suspension. I always felt like I had been beaten with a telephone pole when I climbed off the hard tail bike. The plushness of FS has me wanting more every day!

    It is great that you will be making it a family activity. I am teaching my wife and 6 year old to ride currently so we can do the family trail thing.

    Good luck with the weight loss, sorry I can't offer much info on the bikes you listed, I only test rode FS bikes while looking for my new one.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the encouragement! With having lower back surgery 17 years ago, I'm in need of a good comfortable ride, so maybe a FS will be in my future after I drop most of the weight.

  5. #5
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    Unfortunately I know what it is like to have a vertebrae smashing a nerve, I have found there is something about aluminium that is particularly unfriendly to the joints. FS might help, I don't know, but aluminium produces low frequency vibrations that are absent with steel. For a hard tail, I'd seriously consider steel, or carbon fiber, fat tires and a suspension seat post to top it all off.

  6. #6
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    Any frame material, go for a HT first because it's going to be way too hard to get suspension to work for you. A 27.5 bike that can take + size tires might give you options on a more forgiving ride, but a HT is sensible.
    Given that all bikes are built to the same test standards, get whatever material you want. 'Low frequency vibrations'? That is the first time I've ever heard that bit of folklore!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erwick View Post
    I am quite a few pounds heavier now (340 lbs
    Except for maybe non-bike store bikes, you will have no issues with the frame, unless you are going to get some crazy air, which at heavier weights, isn't a good idea (the bigger they are, the harder they fall).

    I've got seven years on a Cannondale Trail SL (Aluminum entry level frame). I started at 400Lbs, and get in about 1500 miles a year. Have yet to break 300.

    Wheels are what most Clydes fight, so you may need to lace up some stronger rims. You can help yourself by starting off with 36 spokes rear, 32 front, if you can swap wheels. Getting off of a 28/32 setup eliminated wheel issues for me. My wheels were built with DH rims, but if you are starting at 350 and start losing weight immediately, you won't need DH rims unless you're going to DH.

    If you run a loose bearing hub (aka cup and cone, like Shimano), do not run an aluminum free hub, you will want steel. I managed to crack a steel one, but it was during an aggressive climb on a rocky trail in a very low gear.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  8. #8
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    budget?

    +1 3" tires on sturdy rims.

    Check out the Surly Krampus or Karate Monkey. They're both very stout and versatile frames and loads of fun. The only weakpoint for a bigger rider is the Shimano rear hub, but that will be true of most stock wheels.
    Rigid SS 29er
    Fat Lefty
    SS MonsterCross
    SS cyclocross
    all steel

    "Fully rigid" isn't a thing.

  9. #9
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    I am thinking Surly Krampus or possibly even ann ECR? The 29+ tires will be golden and the bike meant for being in the saddle for long periods of time would help at first. As you lose weight, if you get the Krampus, you will find that you have a multi-applicational bike.

    5 years ago I was at 305 ,and got back into MTB after about a 20 year hiatus for the same reasons as you. I was on my old Trek Mountain Trek 830. Granted, I was not doing crazy DH or dropping off 10 foot ledges, but I got back on that old guy and just started riding. The weight came off and I am now around 210.

    I got a Krampus last year and have LOVED everything about it. Having grown up in (and still riding) BMX, I knew I did NOT want any squish front or back and that I wanted steel. I did 2 years or researching bikes as I rode the Trek - which is now my commuter - and narrowed it down to the ECR and Krampus. The Krampus won out b/c it can be a bike packing bike (which is what I like to do the most), a gravel bike, a "zippy" (for a 29er) trail bike. It also rides like a BMX in a way. That is the biggest reason I chose it over the ECR...I liked the geo of the Krampus more. It is great for climbing...

    Just my 2 cents, but I think you should check these bikes out!!
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
    '15 Surly Krampus
    '87 Mongoose Californian Pro

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    budget?

    +1 3" tires on sturdy rims.

    Check out the Surly Krampus or Karate Monkey. They're both very stout and versatile frames and loads of fun. The only weakpoint for a bigger rider is the Shimano rear hub, but that will be true of most stock wheels.
    Around 1500 and the closest Surly dealer to me is about 6 hours away.

  11. #11
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    I was at 300lbs and strated with a 29 ht then 27.5 then a 27.5+. Definitely go for plus tires, they really make you feel stable, avoid wheel deaths and a little softer ride. Check out the diamondback mason, access growler, fuse

  12. #12
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    I'm sure you probably purchased a bike by now, and if you did I'm curious on what you purchased. I also have been looking at a fuse comp but am waiting for the 2018 models to come out. I know when I got my first bike I was 375lbs and everyone told me I should go with a hardtail. I ended up getting a fs bike and loved every ride on that thing. I also purchased a giant xtc back in 08 and love that bike. I am currently 320 and have been riding my giant and have had no issues. I think that riding singletrack and fireroads, it wont matter on the bike. It is when you start getting into technical riding that it may make a difference. I was riding a lot down in California on some pretty technical stuff after I got used to my fs bike and even did some small drops and such and my bike held up perfect. From what I have been reading the fuse comp looks like a good bike for a clyde. I usually ride singletrack and from what I see its perfect for that! Glad your getting back into it, I know I am enjoying being out riding trails again and looking forward to getting back to the 250 mark. Whatever you purchase im sure you will enjoy especially being out with your wife and kids. Good luck and enjoy the trails out there. Let me know what you think of your new bike.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapva View Post
    Steel frame. And there is nothing wrong with steel.
    TRUTH...in fact for anything except full suspension it is my preferred material.

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