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  1. #1
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    What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension

    What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension setups? Would like to know what kind of bikes you have with Front and rear shock pressures or what pound coils you run. Thanks for the info!

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    Rigid bikes. Suspension is great but not mandatory for mountain biking and most suspension cannot handle our weight.

    There's a thread like 5 posts down about setting up a fully for a big guy.

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    This post is meant for guys over 300 lbs with FS. I own a rigid w front suspension and its great. Looking to go full suspension and want to hear from 300+ lb'ers to find out who successfuly have used full suspension and what they used. I already read the post "5 below" and that is one option....obviously looking for others. If you want to post something not related to full suspension setups please respect the thread topic and not post to it

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    Full suspension setup: Lots of travel in my arms and legs. Fat tires.

    How much travel are you looking for? Nobody makes coil springs to handle our weights, At 270lbs I could flex any fork with 32mm stanchions and 20mm TA enough to rub the brake pads on the rotor. I'm building up a hardtail with a Lyrik so I'll post up when I know how 35mm stanchions hold up. You can easily lower a Lyrik, Fox 36, or Totem to minimize the flex. Good thing is these forks are all rated for 203mm rotors so you can have good braking as well.

    Look for simple single chamber air springs so you'll have less seals to worry about popping when running 200-300psi. Rockshox solo air forks seem to handle high pressures really well, Fox rear shocks can handle high pressure as well. Neither are designed for 300lb riders.

    Rear triangles on duallies are flexy. When 160lb riders complain of rear triangle flex, how do you think that bike would fare under a 300lb rider?

    Not to be an ass, but there's a search feature in the blue bar at the top of this forum. Once a month there is a thread about setting up a full suspension bike for larger guys. Yours is probably the 10th one this year.

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    Not to be an ass my self but I feel like a broken record.....I did not nor did I ever ask how to set up someone's bike or to give me information on components, I asked if anyone out there in forum land who is over 300lbs has an "ACTUAL" Full Suspension bike that they own and ride. If they do, then would they kindly post what their successful suspension setup is. I have done searches and all the replies are like yours. TheMammothRider is one of the only guys on this forum who posted his build that works on this website, unfortunately he doesn't know the suspension specs because it was tuned for him, which is probably the best option. It would be nice if you had just one thread that had a list of working setups for Big Clydes so that they had a rock solid concrete starting point with variety of options to look at. Unfortunately this post is turning in to someone trying to give an opinion on a topic when you obviously do not have a full suspension bike that is set up successfully and at 270lbs........I WASN'T ASKING FOR A RESPONSE FROM YOU IN THE FIRST PLACE. It is frustrating when you ask for something specific and you get an opinion on something entirely else. To say there has been 10 posts this year......considering you cannot even understand what information this thread was originally looking for....I can see how you think that to be true.

    AGAIN I ask the following:

    "What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension? I would like to know what kind of bikes you have with Front and rear shock pressures or what pound coils you run. Thanks for the info! If you are kind enough to respond, please let me know just the specific frame and your suspension tuning setup that you are using. Thanks in advance for all your positive responses.

    PLEASE DO NOT REPLY IF YOU ARE NOT OVER 300LBS WITH A FULL SUSPENSION BIKE...

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    Not to be an ass, but I asked the same question not too long ago and felt like an ass after asking because I didn't search first.

    29er Full Suspension for Clydes

    6ft 10" & 448lbs Rider..... (you already found this one)

    Full suspension... super clyde aka fat ass... any hope? (yeah, I got better replies than you... maybe try not being an ass after one "off topic reply?)

    Those are just after a single search for "full suspension" limited to the clydesdale forum. The people riding them are there, but there aren't really whole threads about them. If you see someone that rides the bike you are thinking and is close to your size, hit up a PM for the direct answer. I asked about a ~300# rider that had a Trek Hi-Fi and was told he ran "as much as [he] could" in the rear and ~145psi in the front.

    The simple matter is, you will have a hard time at our size finding something "out of the box" and would likely be much happier having a rear shock "tuned" for you. when I inquired with PUSH about just this (in regards to the Hifi, FSR and Camber) I got this reply:

    Thanks for your email, I appreciate your interest in PUSH!
    The 2012 Superfly 100 Elite uses a 7.75x1.75 shock, it is a
    leverage-monster and would not be a good choice for a rider 260lbs+.
    The Specialized Camber and FSR 29'er would work better for you, but in
    my opinion, I would check out the Niner Rip 9 or a Trek Fuel EX 8/9.
    Those are low-leverage bikes, and we can tune an air shock no problems at all on those bikes. If you're planning on more aggressive riding and resort-type riding, a coil work be more beneficial.
    Hope this helps a bit... I know it is VERY frustrating because there really aren't many 300+ guys riding... unless you mean riding the couch in front of the TV.

    Interesting to me, on the subject, most threads that ask to post specs and set ups, people rarely post THEIR specs and don't actually post how they are set up. They become threads with people posting pictures of their bikes and list out all the components leaving out things that would prove valuable to frustrated clydes...
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Not to be an ass, but there's a search feature in the blue bar at the top of this forum. Once a month there is a thread about setting up a full suspension bike for larger guys. Yours is probably the 10th one this year.
    As I said above... the problem with so many threads is that nobody actually talks about set up.... just bike and what is on it... not pressures or sag or anything else really useful. JJust because someone is riding bike X and fails to tell you they have 375psi in the rear shock doesn't help anyone.... I understand the OP's frustration... I have been there too.... I was probably post #8 for the year asking just about the same question.
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    And... FWIW... I ride a soft tail with a rear shock that has a max 250psi limit.... at 314 I ride with 150psi and do great. The bike is a Trek STP200 (not made in ~10 years) but I am helped because there is no true swing arm and the carbon chain stay acts as the pivot. This adds spring pressure and compensates for my fat ass. The bad thing is... it is a light weight XC bike... and it flexes like a $%^%$! If there were a company that made a bike like this (carbon fiber sprung like the current Cannondale Scapel) but with some added strength, there would be a single company producing bike for us big guys!
    Last edited by Knight511; 10-08-2011 at 12:05 PM.
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    The most important factor for us Uber Clydes in choosing a FS bike is the leverage ratio of the rear suspension.
    The lower the better.
    The way you calculate the ratio is simply divide the wheel travel by the stroke of the rear shock.
    So for my Chumba XCL that has 120mm (4.7") and has a rear shock with a 51mm (2") stroke it has a leverage ratio of 2.35 : 1 which is on the low side.
    The bike works very good for me with merely 250psi in th erear shock and the RP23 is rated for 300psi.
    I run it a little on the plush side with about 30% sag when the pro pedal is turned off.

    I also ran a BMC Superstroke that had adjustable travel of 150-130mm. It has a 2.5" stroke shock.
    When set in 130mm mode it has a leverage ratio of close to 2:1 which is one of the lowest out there.
    The bike worked great for me.....but I had to run about 260psi out of a possible 300.

    The higher the leverage ratio, the more air you need in the shock, or stiffer spring you need if it has coil suspension.

    The leverage ratio will act different with different suspension types.
    My Chumba is a Horst link and has a higher ratio than my BMC, but I find I need to use a little less air in the shock.
    Some of that can be attributed to the geometry of the bike, and how it sits you on the center of gravity of the bike.

    For forks I run a 2010 Fox 36 RC2 Talas which the manual said was rated for 90psi.......well, that s all their psi chart went up to, but when I talked to FOX they told me it can run ALOT more PSI than that. 200psi to be exact.
    I used to run about 110psi when I weighed 330lbs, probably close to 345 geared up.
    Well, I've lost a good chunk of weight recently and am closer to 310lbs geared up and am running closer to 85psi.
    This gives me a plush ride with about 25% sag. But FOX forks are not well known for sagging properly, so I set it up for how it feels while riding. I would say it rides closer to a 30% sag aggressive setup.

    Both my Chumba and my BMC are very stiff frames. The chumba frame weighs around 6.5 lbs and the BMC a whopping 9+lbs!!!!

    I chose these bikes very carefully for their construction, tubing design, leverage ratio and overall feedback regarding lateral stiffness.
    The chumba is an aggressive XC bike that is completely overbuilt for it's intended use.
    I've got a couple thousand hard miles on it and it's been a great bike.

    One thing I did do is add a modified link to the rear end that changed the BB height, makes it lower, and slackens out the head angle about 1* to make it closer to 67* HA. Chumba was offering these kits and it sounded like just the ticket for me, since I do some aggressive riding on this bike.

    FOES is also another brand that I was seriously considering, as they have some really nice bikes and most of them have really low leverage ratios of around 2:1, and the curnutt shocks can take some serious abuse, so I've heard.

    I am about to put together a new bike. A Santa Cruz Nomad, which has a leverage ratio of 2.5 : 1.......a bit higher than what I have been running.
    Remember when I mentioned how different suspension designs will effect the leverage ratio?
    Well, the VPP design of SC effects it in a very positive way, as people usually are running a much lighter spring than on bikes of similar travel/ratio.

    I have a FOX RP23 that will fit the Nomad and will buy the frame with a coil FOX RC4 rear shock.
    I wasn't sure if they made a spring that would work well for me, but after some research it looks like I will be between a 650lbs and 700lbs spring on that bike. FOX makes them up to 750lbs and there are aftermarket options that will far exceed that.

    So there is my collective CLYDE knowledge that I have retained after doing some serious research/testing over the last few years.
    Hopefully it helps you and others out.
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    I forgot to add that I am running the RP23 High Compression tune on my chumba........ Which helps a bit for us bigger dudes to not bottom out.

    There are also ways to tune the internal volume of rear shocks using shims.

    Some float shocks are available in either a regular or high volume air can. I find the HV can makes it harder to setup. When you have proper sag, it will blow through its travel easier.

    It seems to me that regular volume shocks work better for us as they ramp up faster.

    There is always the option of having a suspension tuner rework your suspension, such as PUSH or Avalanche to name 2.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann View Post
    i forgot to add that i am running the rp23 high compression tune on my chumba........ Which helps a bit for us bigger dudes to not bottom out.

    There are also ways to tune the internal volume of rear shocks using shims.

    Some float shocks are available in either a regular or high volume air can. I find the hv can makes it harder to setup. When you have proper sag, it will blow through its travel easier.

    It seems to me that regular volume shocks work better for us as they ramp up faster.

    There is always the option of having a suspension tuner rework your suspension, such as push or avalanche to name 2.
    thanks

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    Knight, Thanks for the info, I did read you post and was just looking for more.........definitely thanks for your input. And again, you're right.....I do have a bit of an A-Type personality..... and I probably was a bit harsh after one reply.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzdyrko View Post
    Knight, Thanks for the info, I did read you post and was just looking for more.........definitely thanks for your input. And again, you're right.....I do have a bit of an A-Type personality..... and I probably was a bit harsh after one reply.
    NP... like I said, I fully understand the frustration. I am with you in size and have spent a lot of time reading and being lied to by some LBSs. I am hopeful that I can get away with riding a FS bike in the future as I know aluminum hardtails are a pain (literally) to ride after an hour or so and my soft tail has been a dream, but replacement parts are dried up and once the rear shock seals blow, I am screwed (I talked to SRAM looking for rebuild and they can't even find one). I am desperately trying to lose weight to really be able to enjoy a FS and hope there is a good one out there for me.
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    Thought I'd pipe in here as I am a 6'5" 330lb'er and am currently trying to dial in my FS bikes. My 26er is a '10 Stumpy Expert with a 140mm Talas up front and the Fox/Speshy AFR 120mm w/ brain in the rear. I just sent both away for tuning, the fork to Push and the AFR to Specialized for their S-tune program. Push's recommendation for my Talas is to run it at 150psi and 1 click from full firm and Speshy recommended my AFR at 325psi 1 click from full firm after the tuning. I have to say that I haven't gotten to ride it yet because I just got the shock back last week and it's been raining ever since.

    For my 29er, I have a '10 Fisher HiFi Deluxe with a Fox Float 100mm up front and an RP2 100mm for the rear. I'm having major problems getting the sag dialed on this bike. This was my first bike I bought in like 10 years and didn't really know what I wanted at the time. For the Float, I run 135psi and it's fine. But the RP2 does not really cooperate with me, even at 300psi. Actually, it's fine going downhill, but there's way too much bob while pedaling uphill. And because I can't get the sag dialed in, my ground clearance is so low that I end up bashing things all the time. I emailed Push about tuning it and they told me the geometry, an issue mentioned in an earlier post, won't really allow them to tune the shock for me. So after talking to Fox, I've tried Fox's air volume reducer which didn't so anything really. And I considered having Fox firm up the valving, but I think it's all a lost cause so I'm just going to sell the bike and pick up a Niner RIP 9 and get a way beefier fork, like a 34 Talas 140mm. I'll probably send the RP23 from the new Niner RIP to Push for tuning too. It sucks being big because as mentioned before, nothing stock really works for us, which I've been learning since starting riding again a little over a year ago. It ain't cheap either.

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    I am going to email PUSH about the JET9 because the RIP seems to be a bit of overkill for my area. I venture a guess to say that the JET should also be prime for tuning because the leverage ratio is even lower than the RIP.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    As I said above... the problem with so many threads is that nobody actually talks about set up.... just bike and what is on it... not pressures or sag or anything else really useful. JJust because someone is riding bike X and fails to tell you they have 375psi in the rear shock doesn't help anyone.... I understand the OP's frustration... I have been there too.... I was probably post #8 for the year asking just about the same question.
    Again, not trying to be an ass, but sag is sag whether you're 140lbs or 280lbs. Sag = suspension setup

    Depending on your terrain you may want 20% or 30% sag. Air springs are awesome for being able to dial in the proper sag for your riding style.

    When I hear suspension setup for clydes, I assume that people know how to set sag on their bike and are asking about what suspension holds up to abusive riding. This generally means DH/FR parts as our XC riding is as abusive as downhill riding for lighter guys.

    Suspension setup - use zipties or o-rings if you've serviced your shocks recently. Get the sag set when you're in the attack position, not as you're comfy sitting in the saddle.
    Adjust the rebound so the fork comes up at a comfortable speed - most big guys like to run more rebound
    Adjust the compression to compensate for brake dive. If you have platform or HSC/LSC adjustment then play with those settings. Again most big guys like more compression damping as we've got more weight to throw around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by masonmoa View Post
    Thought I'd pipe in here as I am a 6'5" 330lb'er and am currently trying to dial in my FS bikes. My 26er is a '10 Stumpy Expert with a 140mm Talas up front and the Fox/Speshy AFR 120mm w/ brain in the rear. I just sent both away for tuning, the fork to Push and the AFR to Specialized for their S-tune program. Push's recommendation for my Talas is to run it at 150psi and 1 click from full firm and Speshy recommended my AFR at 325psi 1 click from full firm after the tuning. I have to say that I haven't gotten to ride it yet because I just got the shock back last week and it's been raining ever since.

    For my 29er, I have a '10 Fisher HiFi Deluxe with a Fox Float 100mm up front and an RP2 100mm for the rear. I'm having major problems getting the sag dialed on this bike. This was my first bike I bought in like 10 years and didn't really know what I wanted at the time. For the Float, I run 135psi and it's fine. But the RP2 does not really cooperate with me, even at 300psi. Actually, it's fine going downhill, but there's way too much bob while pedaling uphill. And because I can't get the sag dialed in, my ground clearance is so low that I end up bashing things all the time. I emailed Push about tuning it and they told me the geometry, an issue mentioned in an earlier post, won't really allow them to tune the shock for me. So after talking to Fox, I've tried Fox's air volume reducer which didn't so anything really. And I considered having Fox firm up the valving, but I think it's all a lost cause so I'm just going to sell the bike and pick up a Niner RIP 9 and get a way beefier fork, like a 34 Talas 140mm. I'll probably send the RP23 from the new Niner RIP to Push for tuning too. It sucks being big because as mentioned before, nothing stock really works for us, which I've been learning since starting riding again a little over a year ago. It ain't cheap either.
    Thanks For the great info!!! That's exactly the kind of info that I was looking for. Thanks you very much.

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    Here is my set up's

    6'2" (You always have to state your height) Roughly 320lbs

    Cannondale Prophet (08) Float R rear(Soon to be push'ed) 07 Marz all mountain 1 SL (air) Roughly 230psi in rear (Around 30-35% sag) 150psi/85psi in AL1 (Positive/Neg chambers for front fork 20mm thru (32mm stanchions)

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    750lbs spring with DHX5 COIL shock 2010 Marz 888RC3 fork Heavy spring/7.5 weight oil.

    Already said but Leverage ratio is important for what kind of bike. Here's my thoughts based off of the bikes I've owned (Giant Trance, Santa Cruz Bullit, Trek Session 77, Azonic Elemenator) I only run 10mm thru for rear(XC) 20mm thru for front (The diamenter of the stanchion is slightly relevant, A older zoke with 32mm is a thicker walled tube than the 35mm version)

    I ride 3-4 times a week with fast guys and DH at least 2-3 times a month(Depending on Wife and work!) New England area(Highland, Attitash, Diablo KT for DH)

    I'm a gear hound. I just listed my FS bikes (I also have a Road bike, A hardtail stumpjumper, and a Yeti DJ for pump, indoor skate sessions and general fun single speed)

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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Again, not trying to be an ass, but sag is sag whether you're 140lbs or 280lbs. Sag = suspension setup

    Depending on your terrain you may want 20% or 30% sag. Air springs are awesome for being able to dial in the proper sag for your riding style.
    The assumption one knows how to set sag isn't the issue. What we (the OP and I) have asked about is actual numbers to achieve the sag. We are trying to get an idea of which bikes would perform best for guys our size. A bike that runs 104psi in the rear shock is going to run MUCH different than one that requires 315psi. And just because a person can get 20% sag doesn't mean the shock is worth a damn riding, ie large volume air canister that bottoms out too easily.

    Air springs are awesome, but there is more to FS bikes than just the rear shock. The RP23 on the Superfly 100 is going to perform differently than the same RP23 on the JET9. Since most of us can't afford to buy multiple $3K bike to figure this out, we like to have some idea of what to look for before going shopping. Everybody seems to agree that the JET9/RIP9 perform better for higher weights than the Superfly 100 and since shop A (in my area) carries Giant/Niner and shop B carries Trek/Specialized, we are trying to figure out who should get more time. I prefer shop B, in my case, but they may not be my best choice since the best service in the world can't make up for a bike that is impossible to dial in.

    We are trying to get a better idea of which bikes with which geometry and set up work better... not just what we need to air ours up to to ride.
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    I am 6ft1in and weigh in the 260s. Dont worry, I got mybike when I weighed in the 330s. I have a 2009 Pivot Mach 429. I have run from 150-190psi or so in my shock throughout the last year and during this weight loss. Alot closer to 150 psi now, and I have never really noticed the shock bottom out. But I dont consider my bike plush. I still think it would ride better with a 100psi in the shock, but I need to drop 60 or more lbs for that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adim_X View Post
    I am 6ft1in and weigh in the 260s. Dont worry, I got mybike when I weighed in the 330s. I have a 2009 Pivot Mach 429. I have run from 150-190psi or so in my shock throughout the last year and during this weight loss. Alot closer to 150 psi now, and I have never really noticed the shock bottom out. But I dont consider my bike plush. I still think it would ride better with a 100psi in the shock, but I need to drop 60 or more lbs for that.
    That is interesting. First time I have seen the 429 come up and running less than 200psi for 330 is pretty good for the range of the shock.... thanks for the info!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adim_X View Post
    I am 6ft1in and weigh in the 260s. Dont worry, I got mybike when I weighed in the 330s. I have a 2009 Pivot Mach 429. I have run from 150-190psi or so in my shock throughout the last year and during this weight loss. Alot closer to 150 psi now, and I have never really noticed the shock bottom out. But I dont consider my bike plush. I still think it would ride better with a 100psi in the shock, but I need to drop 60 or more lbs for that.
    Thanks Adam for the great information, and congrats on the weight loss. I have dropped 30 lbs but that was from 355lbs. Still have a ways to go

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    You guys will get there. Just find a bike that works for you. Hopefully some of these suggestions help your weight loss, even though they may damage your credit card.

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    So I just noticed today that the Cannodale Scapel is a pivotless design like my STP only with 4x the travle and 29" wheels. The added spring from the carbon/aluminum should help lessen the load on the shock, but I wonder if they would hold up with a clyde on board...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    So I just noticed today that the Cannodale Scapel is a pivotless design like my STP only with 4x the travle and 29" wheels. The added spring from the carbon/aluminum should help lessen the load on the shock, but I wonder if they would hold up with a clyde on board...
    Hey Knight, I noticed that Cannondale has their bikes listed with a 300lb weight limit in their manuals online. Whether it would hold up, that I wouldn't know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    So I just noticed today that the Cannodale Scapel is a pivotless design like my STP only with 4x the travle and 29" wheels. The added spring from the carbon/aluminum should help lessen the load on the shock, but I wonder if they would hold up with a clyde on board...
    Not sure what type of riding you do but I am looking into the SC Nomad and 12' Intense Uzzi with coils. You had said you're 314, on a Nomad you'd need around a 700-750lb 2.8 stroke spring that you can find, the Uzzi although a heavier frame, runs at 35% sag you'd need a 500lb spring. I have been talking to Fox and Push and they think both should work well if you're looking for an all mountain rig that still pedals uphill. I have my Kona Hoss for most of my XC riding but I am looking for something that I can bring to Mammoth or Northstar out in Cali and Highland now that I live out in Mass. The 2012 UZZI is supposed to have a stiffer rear in the new model and will also run a 142x12 rear axle. I am waiting until December for its release. Now that I am in New England though.......too much SNOW so I probably won't purchase till March.....Tax return always makes a $3-4000 purchase easier

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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    The assumption one knows how to set sag isn't the issue. What we (the OP and I) have asked about is actual numbers to achieve the sag. We are trying to get an idea of which bikes would perform best for guys our size. A bike that runs 104psi in the rear shock is going to run MUCH different than one that requires 315psi. And just because a person can get 20% sag doesn't mean the shock is worth a damn riding, ie large volume air canister that bottoms out too easily.

    Air springs are awesome, but there is more to FS bikes than just the rear shock. The RP23 on the Superfly 100 is going to perform differently than the same RP23 on the JET9. Since most of us can't afford to buy multiple $3K bike to figure this out, we like to have some idea of what to look for before going shopping. Everybody seems to agree that the JET9/RIP9 perform better for higher weights than the Superfly 100 and since shop A (in my area) carries Giant/Niner and shop B carries Trek/Specialized, we are trying to figure out who should get more time. I prefer shop B, in my case, but they may not be my best choice since the best service in the world can't make up for a bike that is impossible to dial in.

    We are trying to get a better idea of which bikes with which geometry and set up work better... not just what we need to air ours up to to ride.
    When I spoke to Fox about the Trek Slash, and Remedy, they told me that the DRCV rear shock on those two bikes are known to Blow through their travel pretty easily and at the high pressures that we would need to run them at, probably wouldn't work to well. Treks setup guide for those bike are @ 25% sag, general setup is bodyweight + 10lbs. The Fuel is bodyweight + 5lbs. Unfortunately with my body frame type, I played College football as an Offensive lineman at 275lbs with 12% BF. Even if I was to get back into that kind of shape, I couldn't see myself weighing less than 250lbs with the muscle mass that I carry. Unfortunately I am not a clyde that is able to lose 100lbs to ride around at 220-230lbs. I wish, but not possible. I am definitely gonna make a purchase this spring and just go for it....and like you said earlier, i can't afford to buy multiple $3k bikes....if it doesn't work I guess I'll have to sell and try again.

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    I live in North Texas and don't travel much with the bike. I am a prime candidate for a XC bike. My current bike has 25mm of rear travel and I love the way it rides. Just enough to take out the harshness of the trail (between 25mm and carbon). I plan on making this my city bike once I get a new one. 100mm of travel on a 29er would be more than enough for me, I think. Right now, I sit with the Specialized Camber and Niner JET9 at the top of the list. I am not rich, so I have to have a realistic budget to boot.

    The Fuel remains high also because Push recommended it... the Fuel EX8 is spec'd very nicely for the price and falls well within my budget. I would be more interested in just a carbon HT, but most of those are actually over budget or very high in it.

    I put another email in to Push... waiting for a reply.

    It is a drag that Cannondale lists a lower max weight.... I really think that design would be nice for us. I think my STP is a dream and would be happy with it for a while longer, but I can no longer repair/rebuild the shock since no one has parts... and it is a special design that means newer shocks won't fit.

    I am like you... 314 pounds and I know that I won't be getting down to 230 or possibly even 250. I will try, but I have a large frame (evidently very large since finding a saddle with the right spacing for my sit bones was even hard) and I think at 250 I would look funny....
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    Very interesting comments guys - I am following this thread with interest.

    I have recently been talking to the 2 main mtb suspension tuners in the UK - Push and Mojo regarding a new shock for my '98 fsr which takes a 165mm i2i unit. I weigh around 320 lbs. The concensus is go spring and shock rather than air as I will run air units too close to their limit to be effective. the only problem for me at least is that the max spring they do is a 1050 x 1.5 which may do at pinch but a 1200 would be better. It seems from this thread that I should reconsider air for the rear and check out Fox's competitors.

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    Just got a 2010 mach 429, I am 330lbs. running 220psi on the rp23 and 130psi on my 120mm f29. So far everything has been going great with the suspension, its my first fs bike so im still trying to discover more about the rear suspension

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    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann View Post
    The most important factor for us Uber Clydes in choosing a FS bike is the leverage ratio of the rear suspension.
    The lower the better.
    The way you calculate the ratio is simply divide the wheel travel by the stroke of the rear shock.
    So for my Chumba XCL that has 120mm (4.7") and has a rear shock with a 51mm (2") stroke it has a leverage ratio of 2.35 : 1 which is on the low side.
    The bike works very good for me with merely 250psi in th erear shock and the RP23 is rated for 300psi.
    I run it a little on the plush side with about 30% sag when the pro pedal is turned off.

    I also ran a BMC Superstroke that had adjustable travel of 150-130mm. It has a 2.5" stroke shock.
    When set in 130mm mode it has a leverage ratio of close to 2:1 which is one of the lowest out there.
    The bike worked great for me.....but I had to run about 260psi out of a possible 300.

    The higher the leverage ratio, the more air you need in the shock, or stiffer spring you need if it has coil suspension.

    The leverage ratio will act different with different suspension types.
    My Chumba is a Horst link and has a higher ratio than my BMC, but I find I need to use a little less air in the shock.
    Some of that can be attributed to the geometry of the bike, and how it sits you on the center of gravity of the bike.

    For forks I run a 2010 Fox 36 RC2 Talas which the manual said was rated for 90psi.......well, that s all their psi chart went up to, but when I talked to FOX they told me it can run ALOT more PSI than that. 200psi to be exact.
    I used to run about 110psi when I weighed 330lbs, probably close to 345 geared up.
    Well, I've lost a good chunk of weight recently and am closer to 310lbs geared up and am running closer to 85psi.
    This gives me a plush ride with about 25% sag. But FOX forks are not well known for sagging properly, so I set it up for how it feels while riding. I would say it rides closer to a 30% sag aggressive setup.

    Both my Chumba and my BMC are very stiff frames. The chumba frame weighs around 6.5 lbs and the BMC a whopping 9+lbs!!!!

    I chose these bikes very carefully for their construction, tubing design, leverage ratio and overall feedback regarding lateral stiffness.
    The chumba is an aggressive XC bike that is completely overbuilt for it's intended use.
    I've got a couple thousand hard miles on it and it's been a great bike.

    One thing I did do is add a modified link to the rear end that changed the BB height, makes it lower, and slackens out the head angle about 1* to make it closer to 67* HA. Chumba was offering these kits and it sounded like just the ticket for me, since I do some aggressive riding on this bike.

    FOES is also another brand that I was seriously considering, as they have some really nice bikes and most of them have really low leverage ratios of around 2:1, and the curnutt shocks can take some serious abuse, so I've heard.

    I am about to put together a new bike. A Santa Cruz Nomad, which has a leverage ratio of 2.5 : 1.......a bit higher than what I have been running.
    Remember when I mentioned how different suspension designs will effect the leverage ratio?
    Well, the VPP design of SC effects it in a very positive way, as people usually are running a much lighter spring than on bikes of similar travel/ratio.

    I have a FOX RP23 that will fit the Nomad and will buy the frame with a coil FOX RC4 rear shock.
    I wasn't sure if they made a spring that would work well for me, but after some research it looks like I will be between a 650lbs and 700lbs spring on that bike. FOX makes them up to 750lbs and there are aftermarket options that will far exceed that.

    So there is my collective CLYDE knowledge that I have retained after doing some serious research/testing over the last few years.
    Hopefully it helps you and others out.
    Let me know if you build a Nomad and how it works for you. I have been considering a SC Nomad, or possibly an 2012 Intense Uzzi (new model supposed to have stiffened the rear triangle and added 142x12)

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzdyrko View Post
    "What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension?
    I'm about 310 geared up with a loaded camelbak riding a 2006 Specialized Enduro Pro. After blowing the stock Fox DHX 5.0 Air twice I purchased and installed a Fox RC2 coil shock with a 650lb spring (the largest spring they make for that length shock). After the chainstay cracked I had them replaced with the upgraded (stronger) Enduro SX trail chainstays. With the (slightly longer) coil shock and new chainstays the bike is essentially like a 2006 SX Trail with 167mm rear travel. The current setup is stiff and handles any terrain, but is a pig going uphill. Admittedly, some of that sluggishness is my fault, though.

    I'm running the stock Fox 36 Talas on the front, I did have it rebuilt by the guys at MTB Suspension Experts a couple of years ago and asked them to keep my weight in mind. It is stiff, and performs well for me with 75psi. If I had a spare $500 I'd send both the shock and fork to PUSH to get them custom tuned, but they do work well as is.

    My previous trail bike was a 2002 Turner RFX [with a PUSH'd Fox Vanilla RC (750lb coil) and Marzocchi 66SL (150psi negative; 20psi each positive)] and ended up selling it. I was a bit small for me, and I had issues with rear end flex. I also owned a Specialized Big Hit 3 (Marzocchi 888R fork, heavy coil and 15w oil; Fox DHX 5.0 w/ 650lb coil) and a Sinister R9 (same Marzocchi fork; Avalanche-tuned Progressive 5th Element w) for DH riding. They both performed well.

    As far as newer models go I've demo'd the Pivot 429 with Fox RP23 and thought it handled very well. Obviously not as plush as my Enduro, but soaked up tech terrain as well as expected and the frame felt plenty stiff. If I were in the market for a full sus 29er it'd be neat the top of my list.

    I hope that was helpful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by masonmoa View Post
    Thought I'd pipe in here as I am a 6'5" 330lb'er and am currently trying to dial in my FS bikes. My 26er is a '10 Stumpy Expert with a 140mm Talas up front and the Fox/Speshy AFR 120mm w/ brain in the rear. I just sent both away for tuning, the fork to Push and the AFR to Specialized for their S-tune program. Push's recommendation for my Talas is to run it at 150psi and 1 click from full firm and Speshy recommended my AFR at 325psi 1 click from full firm after the tuning. I have to say that I haven't gotten to ride it yet because I just got the shock back last week and it's been raining ever since.

    For my 29er, I have a '10 Fisher HiFi Deluxe with a Fox Float 100mm up front and an RP2 100mm for the rear. I'm having major problems getting the sag dialed on this bike. This was my first bike I bought in like 10 years and didn't really know what I wanted at the time. For the Float, I run 135psi and it's fine. But the RP2 does not really cooperate with me, even at 300psi. Actually, it's fine going downhill, but there's way too much bob while pedaling uphill. And because I can't get the sag dialed in, my ground clearance is so low that I end up bashing things all the time. I emailed Push about tuning it and they told me the geometry, an issue mentioned in an earlier post, won't really allow them to tune the shock for me. So after talking to Fox, I've tried Fox's air volume reducer which didn't so anything really. And I considered having Fox firm up the valving, but I think it's all a lost cause so I'm just going to sell the bike and pick up a Niner RIP 9 and get a way beefier fork, like a 34 Talas 140mm. I'll probably send the RP23 from the new Niner RIP to Push for tuning too. It sucks being big because as mentioned before, nothing stock really works for us, which I've been learning since starting riding again a little over a year ago. It ain't cheap either.
    +1

    I knew being 300lbs and wanting to beat the snot out of my 29er I went big and strong from beginning. NinerWfo9 with foxdhxair rc4 and fox 34 29er upfront. It cost some dollars to do this for sure but I have been so happy not blowing stuff up. I just ride and don't worry about a thing. I am though currently looking for the right tires to run tubeless and not burp do to my weight. Being a heavy guy and bike I want a fast Rollin tire combo with good grip.......currently using nevegal/small block 8 combo with tubes though. Super fast but without tubes I was painting the trail with sealant

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    Thought I'd return to this thread as I'm sitting around hurting after a fall from my newly tuned Push'd Fox Talas blowing out on me yesterday sending me over the bars and down the hill about 20 feet. I've already emailed Push and they're going to pay for the shipping both ways and see if they can do anything/fix it for me. But yeah, as my previous post stated, I'm big, and my ideal weight nowadays would still be like 285-290. I'd be sucked up at 250. I'm getting REALLY frustrated trying to dial in the bikes I have to work for my weight, and suspension is the biggest issue. The Talas is on my '10 Stumpy Expert FSR and when I sent the fork to Push I also sent the shock into Specialized for their S-tune service. The shock is now really firm and to be honest I don't know if the cost was worth it. I think a coil is kind of a must have for large guys. But yeah, I've been riding pretty regularly for a little over a year now, so still kind of a noob, but I'm now finally getting a really good idea to what I want, or I should say what I need (being a big dude). I might do what you did Vince with a Wfo instead of a RIP. I'm also curious to hear from anyone about what full suspension 26er frame is best for big dudes because my Stumpy Expert flexes like a mofo. I'm also interested in hearing if running a fork with larger stanchions is better for big guys?

    Hey Vince. I'm running tubeless on both my 26er and 29er and haven't have any problems with burping at all except for my fall yesterday. My 29er has Stan's Flows with a Speshy 2.4 Purgatory control up front with 2.2 Captain rear. My 26er has Mavics 823's with WTB Weirwolves 2.3 on both. With enough Stan's in them they both hold their seals well. There's another forum post about tubeless in the Clyde section too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by masonmoa View Post
    Thought I'd return to this thread as I'm sitting around hurting after a fall from my newly tuned Push'd Fox Talas blowing out on me yesterday sending me over the bars and down the hill about 20 feet. I've already emailed Push and they're going to pay for the shipping both ways and see if they can do anything/fix it for me. But yeah, as my previous post stated, I'm big, and my ideal weight nowadays would still be like 285-290. I'd be sucked up at 250. I'm getting REALLY frustrated trying to dial in the bikes I have to work for my weight, and suspension is the biggest issue. The Talas is on my '10 Stumpy Expert FSR and when I sent the fork to Push I also sent the shock into Specialized for their S-tune service. The shock is now really firm and to be honest I don't know if the cost was worth it. I think a coil is kind of a must have for large guys. But yeah, I've been riding pretty regularly for a little over a year now, so still kind of a noob, but I'm now finally getting a really good idea to what I want, or I should say what I need (being a big dude). I might do what you did Vince with a Wfo instead of a RIP. I'm also curious to hear from anyone about what full suspension 26er frame is best for big dudes because my Stumpy Expert flexes like a mofo. I'm also interested in hearing if running a fork with larger stanchions is better for big guys?

    Hey Vince. I'm running tubeless on both my 26er and 29er and haven't have any problems with burping at all except for my fall yesterday. My 29er has Stan's Flows with a Speshy 2.4 Purgatory control up front with 2.2 Captain rear. My 26er has Mavics 823's with WTB Weirwolves 2.3 on both. With enough Stan's in them they both hold their seals well. There's another forum post about tubeless in the Clyde section too.
    Sorry to hear about your fall, hopefully you ended up with a graceful enough tuck and roll to stay away from further damage.

    What was the shock over the maximum recommended pressure? If you were over the max pressure, then I would imagine a blowout would be expected. If you were under, then thats just a crappy, fluke shock.

    Also, my important questions to you is:

    Specifically, what wheelset are you running? I want a set of Stans flows in the worst way and I cant decide on hubs, spokes, etc. I was hoping for some input. Thank you.

    Hope you feel better soon and get back on the trails for this nice fall riding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vince7870 View Post
    +1

    I knew being 300lbs and wanting to beat the snot out of my 29er I went big and strong from beginning. NinerWfo9 with foxdhxair rc4 and fox 34 29er upfront. It cost some dollars to do this for sure but I have been so happy not blowing stuff up. I just ride and don't worry about a thing. I am though currently looking for the right tires to run tubeless and not burp do to my weight. Being a heavy guy and bike I want a fast Rollin tire combo with good grip.......currently using nevegal/small block 8 combo with tubes though. Super fast but without tubes I was painting the trail with sealant

    Thanks for the words Psunuc. Did manage to kind of roll it, well sort of had to when the fork blew and all my weight went forward in a hurry. Worst fall since starting to ride again after a few years. The fork was set at 150 psi as Push had recommended. If you get your suspension "Push'd" when you get it back from them there's a little postcard in it telling you how to run it.

    As for wheel setup, and this is taking this thread a bit off topic, but I laced my Flows to some stainless Chris Kings. Used DtSwiss 14 gauge spokes. And did 36 for the rear and 32 up front. Probably could have gone 36 for both, but although I'm big I don't break spokes or bend rims, at least I haven't for a while. For a cheaper option I was told I could do a Hope rear hub with the stainless option but I feel like CK's are even more bullet proof, well at least I hope.

    I wanted to ask Vince about his build if you see this. Wondering what your coil is rated on your WFO? I think I may just go that way myself. Been looking for info on it but Fox's website kind of sucks for technical settings/info and MTBR doesn't have anything either. Also wondering what rear set up you got, the 150 or 135? And with psi are you running it at?

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    The rear coil is 800x2.30, I misspoke earlier thinking it was 850x2.30. It's is an 800lb spring and it is diesel. I cannot bottom this thing out and I wheelie drop of 4 footers with joy. Air pressure is set at factory specs i havent even played with that yet. I believe stock is 250 or 225. Probikesupply@gmail.com. He got it for me

    As far as my bike it is an xl wfo with 150 rear. Front shock is new fox 34 float. The bike is supper solid feeling and for my big size feels like I'm 10 years old again on a Bmx bike. I am loving it.. For all you wide chested guys I actually went to a wider bar and shorter stem. 780 bar and 55mm stem. It's such a direct feeling I climb like a goat and technical stuff is not an issue.....the only issue is squeezing in between 2 little trees, oh well cannot have it all. I had 685 bars then 720 all with a 100mm stem....bring the bars in and in crease your leverage you will never go back.....it also helps us big guy open the lungs and breath better.

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    I did a bit of digging and looking at mfg's websites in this never ending quest to get an idea of what would be decent for us. This is what I found (keep in mind most mfgs do NOT go up to 300# in their settings so these are rough guess, but it is pretty eye opening to me):

    Trek recommends a rider weighing 245 pounds put:
    255psi in a Fuel EX8 DRCV (estimating a 300# rider at 310psi; above Fox's max pressure)
    195psi in a Fuel EX6 Non-DRCV (estimating a 300# rider at 250psi; under Fox's max pressure)
    260psi in a Superfly 100 (estimating a 300# rider at 315psi; above Fox's max pressure)
    240psi in a Rumblefish (estimating a 300# rider at 295psi; under (barely) fox's max pressure)

    Specialized recommends a rider weighing 250 pounds put:
    275 psi in a Stumpjumper FSR 29er (based on 2011 numbers; estimating a 300# rider at 325psi; above Fox's max pressure)
    187 psi in a Camber 29er (estimating a 300# rider at 222psi; under Fox's max pressure)
    260psi in an Epic (estimating a 300# rider at 310psi; above Fox's max pressure)

    Niner recommends 170psi for 240-260 (estimating ~roughly~ a 300# rider at190-200psi; under Fox's max pressure)

    I found this to be rather interesting as it shed some light on the DRCV issues and confirmed what PUSH had told me... except the recommended a Fuel EX8 and I am not so sure about that... the EX5/6 seem like they would be fine though. I think this also helps direct us towards bikes that we should be able to ride without being at the max settings (head room in case we want to run more/less sag for the riding conditions).

    So my short list is still sitting at the RIP9, Camber 29er or the Fuel 6. I really am interested in a 29er this time around, so the Fuel sort of falls out of grace and in my budget, I can either buy the RIP9 frame and SLOWLY build it over the course of a year or so, or buy the Camber Comp 29 and enjoy riding it that year while upgrading a few bits and pieces.... Now.... where can I scrape together some more money?
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    And I used old numbers on the FSR because the 2012's have no numbers since they use the auto-sag feature (and me numbers may not be accurate since 2012 is a redesigned FSR). I would be very curious as to whether or not I could make use of a FSR, but I am not holding my breath.
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    Get the wfo9 if your 300lbs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vince7870 View Post
    Get the wfo9 if your 300lbs.
    Too much travel for my non-mountain mountain biking area. I would run into the same dilemma with the WFO as I do with with the RIP. I can have a pretty frame hanging on my wall for a year or I can be riding a new bike for that year.
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    Can I ask what may seem to be an obvious question - why are we apparently determined to continue with air shocks when most of the information indicates that we are pushing them close to if not over their design limits? Even if they don't fail, we will not be getting the same level of control and comfort that a user 100 lbs lighter enjoys. Even with tuning, they will not be performing optimally as we are operating outwith their design parameters.

    Are spring shocks that much worse?

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dads Taxi View Post
    Can I ask what may seem to be an obvious question - why are we apparently determined to continue with air shocks when most of the information indicates that we are pushing them close to if not over their design limits? Even if they don't fail, we will not be getting the same level of control and comfort that a user 100 lbs lighter enjoys. Even with tuning, they will not be performing optimally as we are operating outwith their design parameters.

    Are spring shocks that much worse?
    Exactly.

    At the risk of sounding like a dooschnozzle:
    If you're 300lbs you've got bigger issues than what bike to choose, maybe spend time thinking of lifestyle changes rather than bike models and suspension setups.

    Get a rigid bike or a hardtail and ride the hell out of it to lose weight. Soon enough you'll lose 20-30lbs and then you can reward yourself with a nice duallie that wont break under the heft.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dads Taxi View Post
    Can I ask what may seem to be an obvious question - why are we apparently determined to continue with air shocks when most of the information indicates that we are pushing them close to if not over their design limits? Even if they don't fail, we will not be getting the same level of control and comfort that a user 100 lbs lighter enjoys. Even with tuning, they will not be performing optimally as we are operating outwith their design parameters.

    Are spring shocks that much worse?
    The question is not about the air shock really as much as the bike's suspension design. It would be a bad idea to buy something like a Superfly 100 to convert to a coil over because you would be hard pressed to find a spring with a high enough rate for that frame's suspension design. At the same time, buying a RIP9 and swapping to a coil would be very acceptable. The air pressures just give a very realistic picture of what spring rate is needed to compare different makes of bikes.

    Remember, "tuning" a shock is not about making it handle a higher spring rate but rather making the dampening handle a higher spring rate. A shock set up to dampen a 100lb spring (coil or air) is not going to do a great job dampening a 300lb spring (coil or air). You can't really beef up a shock to handle a high air pressure as the o-rings and seals are a set size and really can't be changed.

    Personally, I would rather run a coil over because there is less to mess with. I run coils in my front and air in the back right now. I have to stop and check air before every ride and I find that a bit annoying for some reason... my front shock... always ready to go.

    Quote Originally Posted by GTScoob
    If you're 300lbs you've got bigger issues than what bike to choose, maybe spend time thinking of lifestyle changes rather than bike models and suspension setups.
    I don't know anything about you, nor do you about any of us. You make this statement under the assumption that we are all 5'4" and 300 pound fat asses. Some of us, even at a leaner state, are not going to be 200 pounds or less. So regardless of our weight loss routine, we will always have to take our size into consideration when purchasing a bike.

    The reason we are talking about this is because we have already spent "time thinking about lifestyle changes" and have decided to act on it. Believe it or not, not everybody can buy a new bike every couple of years, so if possible it is nice to get something to grow (or shrink in this case) with instead of dropping $1K on a hard tail only to turn around and drop $3K on a FS a year later. I would venture a guess that those of us talking about it already have the mentioned hard tail and are just working on plans for the future.

    Get a rigid bike or a hardtail and ride the hell out of it to lose weight. Soon enough you'll lose 20-30lbs and then you can reward yourself with a nice duallie that wont break under the heft.
    So for some reason you think a person weighing 270 doesn't have to consider weight buying a bike? You are a crazy nozzle to boot! And also since healthy weight loss is ~2 pounds a week, what sense does it make to buy a bike to ride for 3 months only to replace it? Not all of us have unlimited funds to spend on bikes and have to make our purchases very wisely. If I can get a bike that rides and handles my weight now and only get better as I lose some weight, it would be a poor decision to follow your advice and buy something to ride for a short time.

    Also at 6'9" and 270 pounds, you would even be close to maxing many of these bikes out... so even you would have to take your weight into account when shopping for a FS bike.
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    Also at 6'9" and 270 pounds, you would even be close to maxing many of these bikes out... so even you would have to take your weight into account when shopping for a FS bike.
    I definitely do. This is why I avoid duallies and ride bomber wheels, forks, and cranks.

    Frames are relatively cheap when factored into the whole cost of a bike. Get yourself a hardtail, ride it, lose weight. Get a duallie frame, swap the parts over yourself and sell the old frame to recoup some costs. Then you're not out any more $$ than the price difference on the frames.

    Rigid bikes are cheap as **** to build and then you can take the wheels and drivetrain over to a new frame. Or if you choose to keep the rigid bike, it'll make a great commuter bike, winter bike, or rigid bike to keep your handling skills and reflexes top notch.

    You'll lose weight and learn how to build bikes!

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by jzdyrko View Post
    Not to be an ass my self but I feel like a broken record.....I did not nor did I ever ask how to set up someone's bike or to give me information on components, I asked if anyone out there in forum land who is over 300lbs has an "ACTUAL" Full Suspension bike that they own and ride. If they do, then would they kindly post what their successful suspension setup is. I have done searches and all the replies are like yours. TheMammothRider is one of the only guys on this forum who posted his build that works on this website, unfortunately he doesn't know the suspension specs because it was tuned for him, which is probably the best option. It would be nice if you had just one thread that had a list of working setups for Big Clydes so that they had a rock solid concrete starting point with variety of options to look at. Unfortunately this post is turning in to someone trying to give an opinion on a topic when you obviously do not have a full suspension bike that is set up successfully and at 270lbs........I WASN'T ASKING FOR A RESPONSE FROM YOU IN THE FIRST PLACE. It is frustrating when you ask for something specific and you get an opinion on something entirely else. To say there has been 10 posts this year......considering you cannot even understand what information this thread was originally looking for....I can see how you think that to be true.

    AGAIN I ask the following:

    "What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension? I would like to know what kind of bikes you have with Front and rear shock pressures or what pound coils you run. Thanks for the info! If you are kind enough to respond, please let me know just the specific frame and your suspension tuning setup that you are using. Thanks in advance for all your positive responses.

    PLEASE DO NOT REPLY IF YOU ARE NOT OVER 300LBS WITH A FULL SUSPENSION BIKE...
    I was way over three hundred pounds and had Fox RP23 rear and a Fox Talas RL front. I used 1/2 my weight on the front fork and 85% of my weight on the rear. No problems at all. I used that on a Titus Moto-lite and never had any issues. As I dropped weight I adjusted pressures accordingly but still kept about the same percentages. It has worked out well for me. I also use those percentages on my Specialized Stumpy S-Works and it works with it.
    Currently reviewing an Ibex Maroc 29er

  47. #47
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    I have 2008 Cannondale Rize for my cross country ride. I'm 6'2" and 365lbs loaded with gear. I run all Manitou suspension, 2005 Nixon Super with an extra firm ride kit, 7.5 weight oil and 175psi in the fork. I keep the rebound fairly light but cannot remember how many clicks. I could make a FoxRP2 work format weight with out having it tuned. I moved to a Manitou Evolver and this the best shock I have ever used. This is an SPV version but with 75psi in SPV value and 290psi in the main camber the shock rides high and is fairly sensitive to manner of trail nastiness. It is very hard to bottom outso I could probably use less pressure in the shock going forward.

  48. #48
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    After reading the recent posts on this thread, to respond to the post that says maybe us big guys need to lose weight before buying a full suspension, I'm 6'4 and 330 right now. My ideal weight which I was at 10 years ago was 265. I was lean, lifting weights and swimming 6 days a week. Now in my 30's, I've broadened way out and my ideal weight now would still probably be around 280-290. Now after riding again for 1.5 years where I ride 2-3 times a week (average 10 miles a ride with moderate climbing and usually one is a tougher, more technical ride) and swim on my off days I've shed some fat, but haven't lost any weight. I'm athletic though and feel pretty healthy. Some folks are just big mofos. I know 29" wheels absorb a lot of the trail, but my back just ain't going to let me ride a hard tail anymore. There are bikes made that will take the kind of abuse we put on them. Just costs big bank and takes some time doing the research.

    On that note, I'm going down tomorrow to put down the deposit on the WFO I'm going to build. Putting the 34 Talas along with the Fox DHX 5.0 air on it though. The way the frame is set up I think that shock will work. I hope it works. It's probably overkill for what I ride, but f@#% it. I'm sick of breaking stuff and trying to make something work that wasn't built for me.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by masonmoa View Post
    After reading the recent posts on this thread, to respond to the post that says maybe us big guys need to lose weight before buying a full suspension, I'm 6'4 and 330 right now. My ideal weight which I was at 10 years ago was 265. I was lean, lifting weights and swimming 6 days a week. Now in my 30's, I've broadened way out and my ideal weight now would still probably be around 280-290. Now after riding again for 1.5 years where I ride 2-3 times a week (average 10 miles a ride with moderate climbing and usually one is a tougher, more technical ride) and swim on my off days I've shed some fat, but haven't lost any weight. I'm athletic though and feel pretty healthy. Some folks are just big mofos. I know 29" wheels absorb a lot of the trail, but my back just ain't going to let me ride a hard tail anymore. There are bikes made that will take the kind of abuse we put on them. Just costs big bank and takes some time doing the research.

    On that note, I'm going down tomorrow to put down the deposit on the WFO I'm going to build. Putting the 34 Talas along with the Fox DHX 5.0 air on it though. The way the frame is set up I think that shock will work. I hope it works. It's probably overkill for what I ride, but f@#% it. I'm sick of breaking stuff and trying to make something work that wasn't built for me.
    My thoughts exactly!

  50. #50
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    Mason: I have been trying to convince myself that the WFO is overkill for me and that the RIP would be better (I live in North Texas and we "ain't got no" real mountains). Once you have it built up, I would LOVE to see some weights and details on your build. I am not afraid of a bike that weighs a bit more (my current XC soft tail weighs 26.2 pounds) since I want something that isn't going to break every time I go out.
    2013 Specialized Camber Comp
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    2015 Surly Karate Monkey Ops (the commuter)

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