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  1. #1
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    What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension

    What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension setups? Would like to know what kind of bikes you have with Front and rear shock pressures or what pound coils you run. Thanks for the info!

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    Rigid bikes. Suspension is great but not mandatory for mountain biking and most suspension cannot handle our weight.

    There's a thread like 5 posts down about setting up a fully for a big guy.

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    This post is meant for guys over 300 lbs with FS. I own a rigid w front suspension and its great. Looking to go full suspension and want to hear from 300+ lb'ers to find out who successfuly have used full suspension and what they used. I already read the post "5 below" and that is one option....obviously looking for others. If you want to post something not related to full suspension setups please respect the thread topic and not post to it

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    Full suspension setup: Lots of travel in my arms and legs. Fat tires.

    How much travel are you looking for? Nobody makes coil springs to handle our weights, At 270lbs I could flex any fork with 32mm stanchions and 20mm TA enough to rub the brake pads on the rotor. I'm building up a hardtail with a Lyrik so I'll post up when I know how 35mm stanchions hold up. You can easily lower a Lyrik, Fox 36, or Totem to minimize the flex. Good thing is these forks are all rated for 203mm rotors so you can have good braking as well.

    Look for simple single chamber air springs so you'll have less seals to worry about popping when running 200-300psi. Rockshox solo air forks seem to handle high pressures really well, Fox rear shocks can handle high pressure as well. Neither are designed for 300lb riders.

    Rear triangles on duallies are flexy. When 160lb riders complain of rear triangle flex, how do you think that bike would fare under a 300lb rider?

    Not to be an ass, but there's a search feature in the blue bar at the top of this forum. Once a month there is a thread about setting up a full suspension bike for larger guys. Yours is probably the 10th one this year.

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    Not to be an ass my self but I feel like a broken record.....I did not nor did I ever ask how to set up someone's bike or to give me information on components, I asked if anyone out there in forum land who is over 300lbs has an "ACTUAL" Full Suspension bike that they own and ride. If they do, then would they kindly post what their successful suspension setup is. I have done searches and all the replies are like yours. TheMammothRider is one of the only guys on this forum who posted his build that works on this website, unfortunately he doesn't know the suspension specs because it was tuned for him, which is probably the best option. It would be nice if you had just one thread that had a list of working setups for Big Clydes so that they had a rock solid concrete starting point with variety of options to look at. Unfortunately this post is turning in to someone trying to give an opinion on a topic when you obviously do not have a full suspension bike that is set up successfully and at 270lbs........I WASN'T ASKING FOR A RESPONSE FROM YOU IN THE FIRST PLACE. It is frustrating when you ask for something specific and you get an opinion on something entirely else. To say there has been 10 posts this year......considering you cannot even understand what information this thread was originally looking for....I can see how you think that to be true.

    AGAIN I ask the following:

    "What Are Your Suspension Setups for Clydes over 300lbs with full suspension? I would like to know what kind of bikes you have with Front and rear shock pressures or what pound coils you run. Thanks for the info! If you are kind enough to respond, please let me know just the specific frame and your suspension tuning setup that you are using. Thanks in advance for all your positive responses.

    PLEASE DO NOT REPLY IF YOU ARE NOT OVER 300LBS WITH A FULL SUSPENSION BIKE...

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    Not to be an ass, but I asked the same question not too long ago and felt like an ass after asking because I didn't search first.

    29er Full Suspension for Clydes

    6ft 10" & 448lbs Rider..... (you already found this one)

    Full suspension... super clyde aka fat ass... any hope? (yeah, I got better replies than you... maybe try not being an ass after one "off topic reply?)

    Those are just after a single search for "full suspension" limited to the clydesdale forum. The people riding them are there, but there aren't really whole threads about them. If you see someone that rides the bike you are thinking and is close to your size, hit up a PM for the direct answer. I asked about a ~300# rider that had a Trek Hi-Fi and was told he ran "as much as [he] could" in the rear and ~145psi in the front.

    The simple matter is, you will have a hard time at our size finding something "out of the box" and would likely be much happier having a rear shock "tuned" for you. when I inquired with PUSH about just this (in regards to the Hifi, FSR and Camber) I got this reply:

    Thanks for your email, I appreciate your interest in PUSH!
    The 2012 Superfly 100 Elite uses a 7.75x1.75 shock, it is a
    leverage-monster and would not be a good choice for a rider 260lbs+.
    The Specialized Camber and FSR 29'er would work better for you, but in
    my opinion, I would check out the Niner Rip 9 or a Trek Fuel EX 8/9.
    Those are low-leverage bikes, and we can tune an air shock no problems at all on those bikes. If you're planning on more aggressive riding and resort-type riding, a coil work be more beneficial.
    Hope this helps a bit... I know it is VERY frustrating because there really aren't many 300+ guys riding... unless you mean riding the couch in front of the TV.

    Interesting to me, on the subject, most threads that ask to post specs and set ups, people rarely post THEIR specs and don't actually post how they are set up. They become threads with people posting pictures of their bikes and list out all the components leaving out things that would prove valuable to frustrated clydes...
    Fat guys need bikes too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Not to be an ass, but there's a search feature in the blue bar at the top of this forum. Once a month there is a thread about setting up a full suspension bike for larger guys. Yours is probably the 10th one this year.
    As I said above... the problem with so many threads is that nobody actually talks about set up.... just bike and what is on it... not pressures or sag or anything else really useful. JJust because someone is riding bike X and fails to tell you they have 375psi in the rear shock doesn't help anyone.... I understand the OP's frustration... I have been there too.... I was probably post #8 for the year asking just about the same question.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

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    And... FWIW... I ride a soft tail with a rear shock that has a max 250psi limit.... at 314 I ride with 150psi and do great. The bike is a Trek STP200 (not made in ~10 years) but I am helped because there is no true swing arm and the carbon chain stay acts as the pivot. This adds spring pressure and compensates for my fat ass. The bad thing is... it is a light weight XC bike... and it flexes like a $%^%$! If there were a company that made a bike like this (carbon fiber sprung like the current Cannondale Scapel) but with some added strength, there would be a single company producing bike for us big guys!
    Last edited by Knight511; 10-08-2011 at 11:05 AM.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  9. #9
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    The most important factor for us Uber Clydes in choosing a FS bike is the leverage ratio of the rear suspension.
    The lower the better.
    The way you calculate the ratio is simply divide the wheel travel by the stroke of the rear shock.
    So for my Chumba XCL that has 120mm (4.7") and has a rear shock with a 51mm (2") stroke it has a leverage ratio of 2.35 : 1 which is on the low side.
    The bike works very good for me with merely 250psi in th erear shock and the RP23 is rated for 300psi.
    I run it a little on the plush side with about 30% sag when the pro pedal is turned off.

    I also ran a BMC Superstroke that had adjustable travel of 150-130mm. It has a 2.5" stroke shock.
    When set in 130mm mode it has a leverage ratio of close to 2:1 which is one of the lowest out there.
    The bike worked great for me.....but I had to run about 260psi out of a possible 300.

    The higher the leverage ratio, the more air you need in the shock, or stiffer spring you need if it has coil suspension.

    The leverage ratio will act different with different suspension types.
    My Chumba is a Horst link and has a higher ratio than my BMC, but I find I need to use a little less air in the shock.
    Some of that can be attributed to the geometry of the bike, and how it sits you on the center of gravity of the bike.

    For forks I run a 2010 Fox 36 RC2 Talas which the manual said was rated for 90psi.......well, that s all their psi chart went up to, but when I talked to FOX they told me it can run ALOT more PSI than that. 200psi to be exact.
    I used to run about 110psi when I weighed 330lbs, probably close to 345 geared up.
    Well, I've lost a good chunk of weight recently and am closer to 310lbs geared up and am running closer to 85psi.
    This gives me a plush ride with about 25% sag. But FOX forks are not well known for sagging properly, so I set it up for how it feels while riding. I would say it rides closer to a 30% sag aggressive setup.

    Both my Chumba and my BMC are very stiff frames. The chumba frame weighs around 6.5 lbs and the BMC a whopping 9+lbs!!!!

    I chose these bikes very carefully for their construction, tubing design, leverage ratio and overall feedback regarding lateral stiffness.
    The chumba is an aggressive XC bike that is completely overbuilt for it's intended use.
    I've got a couple thousand hard miles on it and it's been a great bike.

    One thing I did do is add a modified link to the rear end that changed the BB height, makes it lower, and slackens out the head angle about 1* to make it closer to 67* HA. Chumba was offering these kits and it sounded like just the ticket for me, since I do some aggressive riding on this bike.

    FOES is also another brand that I was seriously considering, as they have some really nice bikes and most of them have really low leverage ratios of around 2:1, and the curnutt shocks can take some serious abuse, so I've heard.

    I am about to put together a new bike. A Santa Cruz Nomad, which has a leverage ratio of 2.5 : 1.......a bit higher than what I have been running.
    Remember when I mentioned how different suspension designs will effect the leverage ratio?
    Well, the VPP design of SC effects it in a very positive way, as people usually are running a much lighter spring than on bikes of similar travel/ratio.

    I have a FOX RP23 that will fit the Nomad and will buy the frame with a coil FOX RC4 rear shock.
    I wasn't sure if they made a spring that would work well for me, but after some research it looks like I will be between a 650lbs and 700lbs spring on that bike. FOX makes them up to 750lbs and there are aftermarket options that will far exceed that.

    So there is my collective CLYDE knowledge that I have retained after doing some serious research/testing over the last few years.
    Hopefully it helps you and others out.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

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    I forgot to add that I am running the RP23 High Compression tune on my chumba........ Which helps a bit for us bigger dudes to not bottom out.

    There are also ways to tune the internal volume of rear shocks using shims.

    Some float shocks are available in either a regular or high volume air can. I find the HV can makes it harder to setup. When you have proper sag, it will blow through its travel easier.

    It seems to me that regular volume shocks work better for us as they ramp up faster.

    There is always the option of having a suspension tuner rework your suspension, such as PUSH or Avalanche to name 2.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann View Post
    i forgot to add that i am running the rp23 high compression tune on my chumba........ Which helps a bit for us bigger dudes to not bottom out.

    There are also ways to tune the internal volume of rear shocks using shims.

    Some float shocks are available in either a regular or high volume air can. I find the hv can makes it harder to setup. When you have proper sag, it will blow through its travel easier.

    It seems to me that regular volume shocks work better for us as they ramp up faster.

    There is always the option of having a suspension tuner rework your suspension, such as push or avalanche to name 2.
    thanks

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    Knight, Thanks for the info, I did read you post and was just looking for more.........definitely thanks for your input. And again, you're right.....I do have a bit of an A-Type personality..... and I probably was a bit harsh after one reply.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzdyrko View Post
    Knight, Thanks for the info, I did read you post and was just looking for more.........definitely thanks for your input. And again, you're right.....I do have a bit of an A-Type personality..... and I probably was a bit harsh after one reply.
    NP... like I said, I fully understand the frustration. I am with you in size and have spent a lot of time reading and being lied to by some LBSs. I am hopeful that I can get away with riding a FS bike in the future as I know aluminum hardtails are a pain (literally) to ride after an hour or so and my soft tail has been a dream, but replacement parts are dried up and once the rear shock seals blow, I am screwed (I talked to SRAM looking for rebuild and they can't even find one). I am desperately trying to lose weight to really be able to enjoy a FS and hope there is a good one out there for me.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

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    Thought I'd pipe in here as I am a 6'5" 330lb'er and am currently trying to dial in my FS bikes. My 26er is a '10 Stumpy Expert with a 140mm Talas up front and the Fox/Speshy AFR 120mm w/ brain in the rear. I just sent both away for tuning, the fork to Push and the AFR to Specialized for their S-tune program. Push's recommendation for my Talas is to run it at 150psi and 1 click from full firm and Speshy recommended my AFR at 325psi 1 click from full firm after the tuning. I have to say that I haven't gotten to ride it yet because I just got the shock back last week and it's been raining ever since.

    For my 29er, I have a '10 Fisher HiFi Deluxe with a Fox Float 100mm up front and an RP2 100mm for the rear. I'm having major problems getting the sag dialed on this bike. This was my first bike I bought in like 10 years and didn't really know what I wanted at the time. For the Float, I run 135psi and it's fine. But the RP2 does not really cooperate with me, even at 300psi. Actually, it's fine going downhill, but there's way too much bob while pedaling uphill. And because I can't get the sag dialed in, my ground clearance is so low that I end up bashing things all the time. I emailed Push about tuning it and they told me the geometry, an issue mentioned in an earlier post, won't really allow them to tune the shock for me. So after talking to Fox, I've tried Fox's air volume reducer which didn't so anything really. And I considered having Fox firm up the valving, but I think it's all a lost cause so I'm just going to sell the bike and pick up a Niner RIP 9 and get a way beefier fork, like a 34 Talas 140mm. I'll probably send the RP23 from the new Niner RIP to Push for tuning too. It sucks being big because as mentioned before, nothing stock really works for us, which I've been learning since starting riding again a little over a year ago. It ain't cheap either.

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    I am going to email PUSH about the JET9 because the RIP seems to be a bit of overkill for my area. I venture a guess to say that the JET should also be prime for tuning because the leverage ratio is even lower than the RIP.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    As I said above... the problem with so many threads is that nobody actually talks about set up.... just bike and what is on it... not pressures or sag or anything else really useful. JJust because someone is riding bike X and fails to tell you they have 375psi in the rear shock doesn't help anyone.... I understand the OP's frustration... I have been there too.... I was probably post #8 for the year asking just about the same question.
    Again, not trying to be an ass, but sag is sag whether you're 140lbs or 280lbs. Sag = suspension setup

    Depending on your terrain you may want 20% or 30% sag. Air springs are awesome for being able to dial in the proper sag for your riding style.

    When I hear suspension setup for clydes, I assume that people know how to set sag on their bike and are asking about what suspension holds up to abusive riding. This generally means DH/FR parts as our XC riding is as abusive as downhill riding for lighter guys.

    Suspension setup - use zipties or o-rings if you've serviced your shocks recently. Get the sag set when you're in the attack position, not as you're comfy sitting in the saddle.
    Adjust the rebound so the fork comes up at a comfortable speed - most big guys like to run more rebound
    Adjust the compression to compensate for brake dive. If you have platform or HSC/LSC adjustment then play with those settings. Again most big guys like more compression damping as we've got more weight to throw around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by masonmoa View Post
    Thought I'd pipe in here as I am a 6'5" 330lb'er and am currently trying to dial in my FS bikes. My 26er is a '10 Stumpy Expert with a 140mm Talas up front and the Fox/Speshy AFR 120mm w/ brain in the rear. I just sent both away for tuning, the fork to Push and the AFR to Specialized for their S-tune program. Push's recommendation for my Talas is to run it at 150psi and 1 click from full firm and Speshy recommended my AFR at 325psi 1 click from full firm after the tuning. I have to say that I haven't gotten to ride it yet because I just got the shock back last week and it's been raining ever since.

    For my 29er, I have a '10 Fisher HiFi Deluxe with a Fox Float 100mm up front and an RP2 100mm for the rear. I'm having major problems getting the sag dialed on this bike. This was my first bike I bought in like 10 years and didn't really know what I wanted at the time. For the Float, I run 135psi and it's fine. But the RP2 does not really cooperate with me, even at 300psi. Actually, it's fine going downhill, but there's way too much bob while pedaling uphill. And because I can't get the sag dialed in, my ground clearance is so low that I end up bashing things all the time. I emailed Push about tuning it and they told me the geometry, an issue mentioned in an earlier post, won't really allow them to tune the shock for me. So after talking to Fox, I've tried Fox's air volume reducer which didn't so anything really. And I considered having Fox firm up the valving, but I think it's all a lost cause so I'm just going to sell the bike and pick up a Niner RIP 9 and get a way beefier fork, like a 34 Talas 140mm. I'll probably send the RP23 from the new Niner RIP to Push for tuning too. It sucks being big because as mentioned before, nothing stock really works for us, which I've been learning since starting riding again a little over a year ago. It ain't cheap either.
    Thanks For the great info!!! That's exactly the kind of info that I was looking for. Thanks you very much.

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    Here is my set up's

    6'2" (You always have to state your height) Roughly 320lbs

    Cannondale Prophet (08) Float R rear(Soon to be push'ed) 07 Marz all mountain 1 SL (air) Roughly 230psi in rear (Around 30-35% sag) 150psi/85psi in AL1 (Positive/Neg chambers for front fork 20mm thru (32mm stanchions)

    2010 Trek Session 88
    750lbs spring with DHX5 COIL shock 2010 Marz 888RC3 fork Heavy spring/7.5 weight oil.

    Already said but Leverage ratio is important for what kind of bike. Here's my thoughts based off of the bikes I've owned (Giant Trance, Santa Cruz Bullit, Trek Session 77, Azonic Elemenator) I only run 10mm thru for rear(XC) 20mm thru for front (The diamenter of the stanchion is slightly relevant, A older zoke with 32mm is a thicker walled tube than the 35mm version)

    I ride 3-4 times a week with fast guys and DH at least 2-3 times a month(Depending on Wife and work!) New England area(Highland, Attitash, Diablo KT for DH)

    I'm a gear hound. I just listed my FS bikes (I also have a Road bike, A hardtail stumpjumper, and a Yeti DJ for pump, indoor skate sessions and general fun single speed)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Again, not trying to be an ass, but sag is sag whether you're 140lbs or 280lbs. Sag = suspension setup

    Depending on your terrain you may want 20% or 30% sag. Air springs are awesome for being able to dial in the proper sag for your riding style.
    The assumption one knows how to set sag isn't the issue. What we (the OP and I) have asked about is actual numbers to achieve the sag. We are trying to get an idea of which bikes would perform best for guys our size. A bike that runs 104psi in the rear shock is going to run MUCH different than one that requires 315psi. And just because a person can get 20% sag doesn't mean the shock is worth a damn riding, ie large volume air canister that bottoms out too easily.

    Air springs are awesome, but there is more to FS bikes than just the rear shock. The RP23 on the Superfly 100 is going to perform differently than the same RP23 on the JET9. Since most of us can't afford to buy multiple $3K bike to figure this out, we like to have some idea of what to look for before going shopping. Everybody seems to agree that the JET9/RIP9 perform better for higher weights than the Superfly 100 and since shop A (in my area) carries Giant/Niner and shop B carries Trek/Specialized, we are trying to figure out who should get more time. I prefer shop B, in my case, but they may not be my best choice since the best service in the world can't make up for a bike that is impossible to dial in.

    We are trying to get a better idea of which bikes with which geometry and set up work better... not just what we need to air ours up to to ride.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

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    I am 6ft1in and weigh in the 260s. Dont worry, I got mybike when I weighed in the 330s. I have a 2009 Pivot Mach 429. I have run from 150-190psi or so in my shock throughout the last year and during this weight loss. Alot closer to 150 psi now, and I have never really noticed the shock bottom out. But I dont consider my bike plush. I still think it would ride better with a 100psi in the shock, but I need to drop 60 or more lbs for that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adim_X View Post
    I am 6ft1in and weigh in the 260s. Dont worry, I got mybike when I weighed in the 330s. I have a 2009 Pivot Mach 429. I have run from 150-190psi or so in my shock throughout the last year and during this weight loss. Alot closer to 150 psi now, and I have never really noticed the shock bottom out. But I dont consider my bike plush. I still think it would ride better with a 100psi in the shock, but I need to drop 60 or more lbs for that.
    That is interesting. First time I have seen the 429 come up and running less than 200psi for 330 is pretty good for the range of the shock.... thanks for the info!
    Fat guys need bikes too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adim_X View Post
    I am 6ft1in and weigh in the 260s. Dont worry, I got mybike when I weighed in the 330s. I have a 2009 Pivot Mach 429. I have run from 150-190psi or so in my shock throughout the last year and during this weight loss. Alot closer to 150 psi now, and I have never really noticed the shock bottom out. But I dont consider my bike plush. I still think it would ride better with a 100psi in the shock, but I need to drop 60 or more lbs for that.
    Thanks Adam for the great information, and congrats on the weight loss. I have dropped 30 lbs but that was from 355lbs. Still have a ways to go

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    You guys will get there. Just find a bike that works for you. Hopefully some of these suggestions help your weight loss, even though they may damage your credit card.

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    So I just noticed today that the Cannodale Scapel is a pivotless design like my STP only with 4x the travle and 29" wheels. The added spring from the carbon/aluminum should help lessen the load on the shock, but I wonder if they would hold up with a clyde on board...
    Fat guys need bikes too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    So I just noticed today that the Cannodale Scapel is a pivotless design like my STP only with 4x the travle and 29" wheels. The added spring from the carbon/aluminum should help lessen the load on the shock, but I wonder if they would hold up with a clyde on board...
    Hey Knight, I noticed that Cannondale has their bikes listed with a 300lb weight limit in their manuals online. Whether it would hold up, that I wouldn't know.

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