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  1. #1
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    What shock and fork for a 240lbs guy

    I'm looking at replacing my fork and rear shock. Rear shock first i bottom that out more than the fork. I'm riding an iron horse mavrick fs(obviously if I have a rear shock right?) I don't do any major jumps or drops. Drops probably at most 2-3 ft to flat and maybe 4 to trans if I'm feeling froggy. But I don't have a chance to do a 4ftr offten. Mostly just ride single track xc w/ lots of roots and log crossings. I have an MZ comp (marzochii) front for w/ 100mm travel. For most of the time it's ok. But I know will be wearing out sooner than later. Rear shock is a tough shock??? w/ coil I have the coil pretty much all the way down and it still is bottoming out. Looking for suggestions. TIA.

  2. #2
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
    Reputation: bear's Avatar
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    just get a stronger coil for the rear shock, no reason necessarily to replace the damper.

    Coils are cheap too, IF you can get the right spring weight.

    According to the Iron Horse web site your bike as 4" travel with a 1.5" throw shock, if this is right and if the TF Tuned Shox Spring Calculator is not on crack then you would need like a 800# or 900# coil. Looks to me like the 750# is the most common max-strength out there so that could be hard to match.

    So, maybe you need an air shock to get the right spring weight in there.

    Marzocci makes a nice air shock ( the Roco Air ) that lists in the size that would work for you ( 6.5" shock eye-2-eye with 1.5" throw ) but I don't know how available it is. It's a pretty inexpensive shock and a number of people are reporting it as a Good Thing.

    Fox makes the Float R which is an air shock that lists in your size, and is probably pretty reliable. ProPedal could be a nice addition too.

    Manitou makes a Swinger SPV 3- and 4-way Air shocks which could be a good fit, and would add the SPV tech to the situation which may make your bike more pedal-efficient (what with it being a single-pivot, if I read the web site right).

    Putting a firmer spring in your fork may help that. The MZ Comp I'd bet that changing oil to a heavier weight than stock may help with the compression and rebound damping. There may also be additional damping adjustment internally but I don't really know.

    Failing either of those and ready to spend some money, an air-spring type fork would let you get the proper spring weight going. A couple years ago I had an MX Comp from Marzocchi that had air-spring in both legs, and it worked great (and at weighed about what you say you do). A current-model MX Pro may be a good match for you.

    Keep in mind though that your bike was not designed for the drops that you are doing, you could be endangering yourself at some point by doing so. 2-4 drops by a Clydesdale on a "recreational XC" bike is not necessarily within design parameters. You may want to just save up for a while and get a more appropriate machine for what you are doing. It'd be a lot more, but once you consider that you're talking about spending 400-700 bucks just upgrading the current bike the prospect of spending 1200-1500 on a complete machine that is more suitable is not completely out of the question.

  3. #3
    Making fat cool since '71
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    Air shocks are typically not a good choice for us. If the information about the shock stroke is accurate (1.5") then the leverage ratio for that bike is 2.6666/1. That is pretty high for a clyde to consider an air shock. I had an air shock on a bike with a 2.5/1 ratio and had to run 270-280 psi in it to get proper sag (it was a dhx air). Most air shocks don't allow for air pressure higher than 300.

    Also, those online calculators are often screwy and the TF is no exception. I weigh in at 255-265 on the bike and find a 700# spring with some preload good for the shuttle days and an 800# spring with no preload OK for XC days (a bit too much, but barely). Anyway, finding springs over 700# is a bit of a chore. Fox makes some, Manitou makes some.

    For rear shocks my advice is: stay away from air considering the leverage ratio and your weight.

    Forks? Marzocchi AM or Z1 light.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  4. #4
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    I generally agree with ImaKlyde about air-vs-coil (which is why my main rear shock is a coil and my backup an air) BUT I've been very pleasantly surprised by the high volume shocks of late generation.

    My bike has a 3:1 ratio (6" travel 2" shock stroke) and I only need about 170# of air for proper sag and behavior on it ('06 Swinger 3-way air) with me currently weighing 225-ish w/o gear. I'd not like to run a small-volume shock on it, but the larger-volume stuff seems good.

  5. #5
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    I might try switching the coil out from my old pacific fs. I have it cranked down about 3/4 of the way and it's almost like riding a hardtail. The front fork for now is holding up and should last me till xmas. Thats when we'll see what kind of scratch I get and decide if going w/ a new bike or just replaceing the fork will work. I love my bike I'm extremelly comfrotable on it and really have no money into purchasing it so IMO i can put 400ish and still come out ahead. Than if I would've gone out an spent 1k+ which the wife would've never let happen. This way when it's all said and done I can point out she should've let me just spend the money. HAHAHAHA. Although if I go w/ a new bike after xmas I think it will be a hardtail. I have no real use for a FS here in ohio. I ride a lot of single track. I just couldn't pass up the price on the Ironhorse so I bought it.

  6. #6
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
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    I'm about 50lbs heavier than the OP and IMHO, the newer air shocks are fine, even for big fellas (maybe even especially for big fellas). I replaced a Vanilla coil (#900 spring) with a Swinger 4-Way Air that was superior in every way even though I had it near or at max pressure.

    I'm riding a 3-Way Air now that works great for me too. On this current bike, I only need 190psi in the main air chamber.

  7. #7
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    with the cost of the propedal float r and the marzocchi roco r air they're really good options to try. if you or your bike wants good pedal-platform-valving type stuff then i'd really lean on the propedal float or the maniou swinger 3- or 4-way. Keep in mind that a new coil shock usually also means a new coil, so add 20-40 bucks in addition to the shock body to that equation. I just go done spending just under 400 for a zoke roco tst r coil and a 700# coil for my ride (only one short ride on it so far but it's all good - and I was replacing a 4 yr old fox vanilla rc coil)

  8. #8
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    I use Rp3 for almost 3 years, up and down between 250-220lb, the bike is SC Heckler,
    had few problems with it, sent it to fox after 10 month to fix the seals and after a very short time (few weeks) the shock lost all the compression again, sent it to PUSH this time and it is perfect ever since.
    when work it have no problem to take a very aggresive riding.

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