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Thread: Very new.

  1. #1
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    Very new.

    Hey everyone! I'm really glad I found this community. I am 6'4" and weighing in at around 260 lbs. I am very new to bikes. I mean, I did ride them as a child, but nothing as of late.

    I really have no clue where to start. I'm looking at getting a bike to assist with more cardio, and would like to know which bikes would hold my weight but not break the bank. I am definitely wanting to go on trails after I start getting into it.

    Any and all help is appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the corral...

    Everyone's idea of "breaking the bank" is different. What sort of price range are you trying to stay within?
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    This is true. I should have been more clear in the original thread. I'm thinking somewhere up to about $500 - $600 USD. Of course if I could get away with spending less would be ideal. I understand the rule for larger guys. We have to spend more for just about everything. I ideal would like to be spending around $300 - $400 USD.

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    You can pick up a Hardrock Sport Disc for about $600, I have read that Clydes have been happy with those. If you take to this sport and start riding frequently plan on having to upgrade the wheel set in a short period of time and you will probably have to do that with any bike you get in that price range.

  5. #5
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    you'll end up having to upgrade nearly everything on the bike: drivetrain, wheels, pedals etc. I'm about the same weight and for what I've spent on repairs, I could have gotten a Specialized Carve. ymmv

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    Thanks so far for the information. I won't mind upgrading things at a later date. I first need to just get on a bike that I would be able to ride around my city, and on basic dirt roads at first until I become more comfortable on trails.

    Could I use a mountain bike on roads at first, or is that not a good idea?

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    I have just ordered my first mountain bike (a 29er), but I have been riding for quite awhile - mostly road bike. I'm 6'0" and weigh 235. A couple years ago, I got an urban/hybrid bike - a Scott Metrix for around $550. It was the perfect bike for rides up to 20 miles, and it was great for all-around use. This past year, I started taking it on trails to see what that was like. I enjoyed it so much that I decided to switch mainly to off-road riding. Hence, the 29er. But I found that the Metrix was a fine bike for moderate trail riding. I did a lot of river bottom trails, fire roads, and even a few single track trails in the local parks. As an introductory bike, it worked great. I'd recommend that as a possibility.

    One thing that I've learned, though, is that when you spend money on a cheap frame with the intent on upgrading, you almost always end up spending more, and you eventually will want to get a better frame. I decided to get a decent bike right out of the gate - I figure I won't need to do much upgrading with it. But the definition of a "decent bike" is tremendously broad - especially with groups like this who are rabid about their gear (inc. myself).

    At any rate, my Scott Metrix was fine on the trails, and it got me interested enough to take the next step. Have fun with your quest!

    Dean

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    Quote Originally Posted by lunchboxjr View Post
    Thanks so far for the information. I won't mind upgrading things at a later date. I first need to just get on a bike that I would be able to ride around my city, and on basic dirt roads at first until I become more comfortable on trails.

    Could I use a mountain bike on roads at first, or is that not a good idea?
    If you are going to go on roads make sure you either have a rigid fork or a suspension fork with a lockout. Suspension is meant for offroad riding. It's makes things much tougher on pavement, especially when you climb up a hill. Many forks have a switch that locks out the suspension so it can be used on the roads and then unlocked for the trails. Based on the riding that you are describing that is what you need.
    He who dares....wins!

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    You're kinda between a rock and a hard place. On one hand if you spend a lot of money and get a solid bike and not like the sport you lose, on the other if you don't spend enough the bike will limit your performance and you lose.

    IMO for big guys $600 for a new bike won't do enough for you. However spending up to that amount on a solid used bike you might end up with a solid bike. I bought a used bike for $250 that would work for you quite nicely. The frame is basically brand new and the wheelset was decent. Swapped on some better parts and I'm very happy with the bike. Otherwise I was looking at $2500 or so for everything I wanted.

    Buying new, at least where I live, the minimum I would consider would be a Surly Ogre at $1500. Strong frame and wheels, decent parts, rigid hardtail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    you'll end up having to upgrade nearly everything on the bike: drivetrain, wheels, pedals etc. I'm about the same weight and for what I've spent on repairs, I could have gotten a Specialized Carve. ymmv
    I would disagree there. Unless you're buying a cheap-a$$ Walmart bike or something, any decent name-brand bike from a proper bike shop will be fine.

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    So I went to a local bike shop and the guy working there suggested a Giant Talon 29er 2 2012 for around $550 usd. Anyone know if this would be a decent starter bike for this price?

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    Being a reformed upgrade wh0re, I'm a bit more zen about cycling nowadays :-)

    Here's my advice for all newbs.

    1. Buy the best bike you can afford at the time. It will influence what happens with #2.

    2. Don't upgrade for 6 months. Give your components a chance to either prove themselves or fail.

    3. Component life is largely influenced by *how* you ride.

    4. Full-length cable housing. These make even the cheapest shifters feel like new.

    5. Don't be ashamed of your bike around other riders (see #1).

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    Quote Originally Posted by lunchboxjr View Post
    So I went to a local bike shop and the guy working there suggested a Giant Talon 29er 2 2012 for around $550 usd. Anyone know if this would be a decent starter bike for this price?
    Yes. Giant bikes are very good value.

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    Thanks so much for the information. I really appreciate all of it.

    Any other bikes I should look for in that price range?

  15. #15
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    Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc 29
    Specialized Bicycle Components
    - full length housings and hydro disc brakes

  16. #16
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    Prior to getting my Carve I was on a Hardrock, it was a 2010 and I put some Maxxis "Hookworm" 2.5 tires on it and used it as a commuter bike. It worked. The Suntour fork bounced and I loosened up the BB and had to get it tightened. I am 6'4" 300lbs, and bought the 26er 21" XL model. Never took it on the dirt (Hookworm are street only) but it served me fine. The newer 2012's and 2013's should work even better (and 29er to boot). With the Suntour fork upgrade for $175 you could get a nice 2012 leftover and Radion Fork for around $600 and be quite happy. Rockhoppers are trail capable bikes and should get you into the sport while lasting long enough for you to know what you want in the future.

    Mark
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Very new.-bike.jpg  

    2012 XXL Carve Expert

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    Quote Originally Posted by R+P+K View Post
    I would disagree there. Unless you're buying a cheap-a$$ Walmart bike or something, any decent name-brand bike from a proper bike shop will be fine.
    I'm speaking from experience. in the first 6 months and 1300 miles of ownership of my Specialized HardRock, I replaced 6 chains, 2 cassettes, 1 set of wheels (waranteed), 1 set of shifters, 2 sets of cables, 1 set of chainrings, 2 sets of pedals and 3 tires. I've converted it into a 1x8 from a 3x7 and have not had any further problems, but for what I've spent on parts and labor, I could have had a much nicer bike. Entry level is entry level and truly intended for the casual, occasional rider. If the OP intends to really put his new bike to use, he's better served getting a nicer bike from the start- he'll end up getting one anyway and it will save him $600-1500 to just get a nice bike in the first place. ymmv

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    I have to agree with Gigantic. Bought a Kona Munimula and ended up replacing the fork, the drivetrain and the wheels. When the frame broke I bought the used bike and put all those parts on there EXCEPT the rear wheel. New frame has a disc mount and no mount for my V brakes. It's not too bad a build, little more flex at speed. But last ride I think the freehub seperated for a minute, felt like I threw the chain but it was still on, ran through gears and it re-engaged. But wouldn't you know it, the one thing that I didn't buy quality looks like is going to fall apart. I should start looking for a rear wheel now lol.

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    Should I consider buying used? If so, is posting a link to see if it's a good deal an option on these forums?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I'm speaking from experience. in the first 6 months and 1300 miles of ownership of my Specialized HardRock, I replaced 6 chains, 2 cassettes, 1 set of wheels (waranteed), 1 set of shifters, 2 sets of cables, 1 set of chainrings, 2 sets of pedals and 3 tires. I've converted it into a 1x8 from a 3x7 and have not had any further problems, but for what I've spent on parts and labor, I could have had a much nicer bike.
    I would say your breakages are more the exception than the rule.

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    The Specialized Hardrock is a great choice for a 1st bike, Ive had mine a year and a half I started out at 275 now down to 250 the bike has held up well. mine was 580.00

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by R+P+K View Post
    I would say your breakages are more the exception than the rule.
    I disagree. Big boys that ride aggressively do bad things to bikes. I cracked two frames last year and im not even close to a super clyde.

    OP, a week since your post.... but yes with your budget i would go used. A lot of riders upgrade to the latest bling and sell off perfectly good bikes for dirt cheap. $3000 - $5000 new goes for $1500 a season later. For $600, if you are careful, you can get a rock solid bike where upgrades are not perfume on a pig.
    "Bigring, that's deep. ...Well, I suspect it is. I didn't read it."

  23. #23
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    Airborne Guardian should be looked at in that price range. They are online only but provide great value for $$$.

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