Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29

Thread: Vegetarian

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    95

    Vegetarian

    About a month ago, I bought a food journal. I'm 33 and this is the first time I've tracked how many calories I eat during a day. After a few days, it became quite clear why I was 5'10 and 240 pounds. Eating out/fast food several times a week was killing me. After about a week, I started I calculated that I could have about 3200 calories a day and maintain my current weight. I then calculated the number of calories I could have a day at my goal weight of 160. It's about 2000 calories without exercise. So over the past few weeks, I've stayed under 2000 calories a day and rode my bike. I haven't factored in calories burned on the bike in my equation.

    Anyway, what I've found is that its much easier for me to eat foods with a lot of fiber like lentil soup, whole grain bagels, whole grain pasta, brown rice and vegetables and stay under 2000 calories. I can get a lot more bang for my buck in terms of feeling full and staying under my caloric ceiling for the day. At this point, I'm not considering going vegetarian full time, but I really enjoying eating this way. I've been eating Amy's organic meals several times a week - tofu bowls and rice and bean burritos. They are low in fat, full of fiber and taste great.

    I've lost about 15 pounds in the last month with most of that being in the last two weeks as I've gone to the vegetarian lifestyle.

    Has anyone else had any luck with a vegetarian diet? Any war stories to share?

  2. #2
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    I tell you what friend. Everyone from our neanderthal ancestors to your modern man has subsided on animal products. Animal protein is easier for the human body to digest than plant protein, by far. The downsides however are the obvious hormone farm-stock (poultry) manipulation and fat-mass manipulation for sake of flavor in our meat supply (beef).

    I dont mean it as an insult but I would say, before going 100% vege, try things like lean chicken breast (wild or organic if you can find), tuna, herring and salmon. Perhaps even lean round-eye steak. Fish is incredibly good for you. Its also a mainstay of my Eastern European diet. It would be extremely difficult for individuals in Eastern Europe to become independent of meat, so nobody that I know of really tries, even though we're now on East Coast USA.

    PS: Try to avoid artificial-color-injected smoked salmon.

    And GL, for weight management, I think your diet will deff work. Just dont discount lean meats and their benefit just because you lose on all-veg.
    Be excellent to each other.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    95
    I agree with you - especially on the fish. I'd like most of my animal protein to come from seafood. Wild salmon may be one of the best health foods on the planet. I was reading about Dean Karnazes diet the other day. He's an ultra endurance runner who puts in insane mileage. He eats Salmon several times a week. I have trouble preparing it so it tastes good, but I need to make that a priority.

  4. #4
    Not a lurker
    Reputation: ortrigger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    86
    Another thing about the vegetarian thing is, if you go all vegetarian, you'll have to take about six different vitamin supplements to make up for the protein and everything you won't be getting. Red gave some good advice up there. And remember, it's okay to go out to eat once in a while. Just keep the phrase, "Moderation in all things," in mind.

    I know you probably aren't a Mormon but this has since been proven scientifically to help maintain/drop to a healthy weight.
    ^Rides a Specialized
    MTB Name = Leg Ripper Offer
    I'm Mormon. =)

  5. #5
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by hdo_1975
    I agree with you - especially on the fish. I'd like most of my animal protein to come from seafood. Wild salmon may be one of the best health foods on the planet. I was reading about Dean Karnazes diet the other day. He's an ultra endurance runner who puts in insane mileage. He eats Salmon several times a week. I have trouble preparing it so it tastes good, but I need to make that a priority.
    Smoke salmon on a whole wheat bagel sounds amazing right now. Oh and the best part is smoked salmon comes in its own Omega 3 oils, so put a thicker slice or 2 thin slices on one side. But I guess smoked salmon might not be for everyone if you dont like the flavor (unimaginable). Oh and smoked-salmon-cream-cheese is incredibly popular here on the east coast, it goes great with a bagel, but not nearly the benefits of a real slice of salmon, but can get you on the path.
    Be excellent to each other.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    95
    Alcohol was never a source of weight gain for me. It was always the food - bad food. I've decided that I'd much rather ride hard, eat healthy and have a couple of pale ales or unfiltered wheats now and then. Like the food - all things in moderation. I'm Catholic too, so it may be a sin if I quit drinking.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: njbiker66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    447
    Say What??
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    3,976
    I think the problem is that we create our meals around a big hunk of meat with veggies and carbs in smaller quantities. If you look at Asian countries where the populous is much thinner they feed the entire family with the same amount of protein as one of us has in a single portion. My thoughts are that one should not eliminate protein but reduce the amount eaten per meal. Double the plant matter and half or even quarter the amount of meat. Of course this is all just my opinion. YMMV.

  9. #9
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,840
    i think what you've found is healthy eating, not vegetarianism. i've known plenty of fat vegetarians and vegans. there's alot of sugary junk food, excessively salty food and fried food available that fit's the vegetarian and vegan diets.

    regarding protien, i don't what's actually more easilly digestible, but i do know that vegetarians, on average, get waaaay more protien than omnivorous folk. if i was forced to, i could search for the article, but so could whoever is questioning that. all the manufactured vegetarian freezer foods and the like are loaded with soy protien. and salt...

    i think you can live a perfectly healthy life eating lean and occasionally fatty mammals, and plenty of fish, with the addition of the foods you described above. but, like everyone else, i don't know everything.

    sounds like you're on a good path though. best of luck.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tortfeaser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    35
    Good for you hdo_1975.

    I went macrobiotic (google it) a year and a half ago. Changed my life for the better.

    P.S. There is some misinformation being tossed around from some of these meat-eating posters. Beware what you read.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: karpiel666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,127
    I went almost vegan for a couple years to drop some weight, all I did was change my diet and sit around playing computer games and I lost right around 60 pounds, felt great and my guts had never been happier. Lentils and cabbage are your friends, cheap, great for you and can be super tasty and filling. Buy a really nice, large crockpot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Qatarbhoy
    I have to ask for them to do a "Number two" on my head

  12. #12
    Grinder
    Reputation: nogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    337
    lol steak mmmm whether its bad for me i dont care. i love it.

    but seriously most foods are ok in moderation. whats important is a well rounded diet. your body still needs protein either way. but if your diet works for you then go for it. diets are like opinions everyone has one.
    Quote Originally Posted by a stoned guy with a beer in his hand eyeballing your sisters bike
    "i fit my bike to fit me;not for looks...nice did you buy that bike from jc whitney?" Stoner Island 1984

  13. #13
    all about the ride down
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    360
    Without supplementing it is next to impossible to get a complete protein source on a vegetarian diet. Not to mention it is IMPOSSIBLE to get necessary B-Vitamins for protein absorption. We have one gut and herbavores have 2. Apes have a large active gut to digest all the plant matter they eat. Our gut is more like a dogs or a wolves than an ape. We are not meant to exist on a vegetarian diet.
    For the OP- if you do not eat sufficient amount of complete protein you will suffer from muscle wasting. The less muscle you carry the more inefficient your body will be a t using fat for energy. You will be a skinny fat person. which equals weak and unhealthy.
    The More People I Meet the More I Prefer Dogs!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    7,878
    Hey OP - do what works for you. The poo-slinging from herbivores is much like singlespeeders saying that you don't need gears.

    The fact of the matter is that our Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) is based on meat. I was raised this way too - a meal isn't a meal without a chunk of meat and a sprinkling of carbs/veggies. Most of us cannot separate ourselves from this mindset. Add into the equation that food is a commodity with strong emotional and psychological ties and the argument gets ugly fast.

    I will say what works for me, as I have done a year of fish/eggs only, periods of vegetarianism and concentration on raw foods. I eat raw foods 80% of the time - I found that my skin is clearer, my mind is sharper and my sleep is better when doing this. This means lots of nuts/fruits/veggies/mushrooms. I don't hold back from eating some meat, but it isn't every day that I do...trust me, nothing makes me happier than some carne asada tacos after churning out some miles. I cook fish often, add raw eggs to my smoothies and like to hit the grill.

    I do try and avoid eating lots of grains, though, as the amount of refining yields little to no nutritional benefit and they make me feel heavy.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: karpiel666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,127
    Quote Originally Posted by split.therapy
    Without supplementing it is next to impossible to get a complete protein source on a vegetarian diet. Not to mention it is IMPOSSIBLE to get necessary B-Vitamins for protein absorption. We have one gut and herbavores have 2. Apes have a large active gut to digest all the plant matter they eat. Our gut is more like a dogs or a wolves than an ape. We are not meant to exist on a vegetarian diet.
    For the OP- if you do not eat sufficient amount of complete protein you will suffer from muscle wasting. The less muscle you carry the more inefficient your body will be a t using fat for energy. You will be a skinny fat person. which equals weak and unhealthy.
    There are plenty of complete protein sources. It is entirely possible to get all the b vitamins you need, you just need to know what you're doing and hunt for a source. The human gut is almost completly unique. Sure we are not meant to be vegetarian, we also aren't meant to eat dairy and red meat all day everyday. Most people are complete retards about it, but you can get everything you need.

    And yea, avoid the dreaded skinny fat, they are the bane of my existance.
    Quote Originally Posted by Qatarbhoy
    I have to ask for them to do a "Number two" on my head

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    95
    Character Zero,

    That is probably what I'm leaning towards. I'm eating almonds daily along with yogurt to help with protein intake. I've been eating a whole grain bagel - 170 calories with 8 grams protien and 9 grams of fiber - along with hummus every morning. I'm trying to limit my processed grains to that bagel. Otherwise its brown rice as a staple carb source.

    Next week I think I'm going to add a couple of egg whites for breakfast and try to work in a serving of fish daily if possible. Canned or packaged tuna is not ideal, but I may try to have a serving if I don't have time to prepare salmon or tilapia. Its a work in progress though.

    Staying under my daily calorie limit is very easy when you eat healthy. I'm actually struggling to eat enough calories now. Good problem to have considering my lifestyle up until this month.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    15
    Just look around you and it's obvious that most Americans have a poor diet, don't exercise, overeat and have been brainwashed by the fast food and beef industries. Use your mind and think for yourself.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by WeR138
    Just look around you and it's obvious that most Americans have a poor diet, don't exercise, overeat and have been brainwashed by the fast food and beef industries. Use your mind and think for yourself.
    Wise words. One visit to a feedlot would probably shock most people. Living in Oklahoma, I'm happy to see a lot more small scale organic, grass fed beef operations. Cattle were never meant to eat corn and hormone enchanced supplements.

    You own 12 bikes?

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    788
    Quote Originally Posted by hdo_1975
    I have trouble preparing it so it tastes good, but I need to make that a priority.
    Hey! I can pitch in here! We eat a lot of Salmon/Salmonid fish. Wild caught, no farm raised for us (Besides the chemicals induced, Salmon Farms are terrible for our Ocean Fisheries). I'm also a recreational angler (Fly Fishing mostly) so I like fish as a whole.

    These are basically the only two ways I cook Salmon/Trout. White fish like Haddock, Cod, Pollock gets grill-baked in an aluminum pan with lemon, salt, and pepper. My wife loves it.

    EDIT: Ok, here is one recipe I use... I just copied this from a message I sent to a friend.

    My favorite way to cook trout (or most other game fish, except salt water white fish) is to do it campfire style. It isn’t that much different than pan frying but there is less clean up.

    I’ll write the instructions for how to do it over propane, since adding wood chunks to a charcoal fire doesn’t take any special preparation.

    Soak your favorite wood chunks in whatever cheap bourbon you can find. Water works, so does apple juice, but I prefer bourbon. You’re trying to slow the burn of the wood chunk so that it smokes with flavor smoke instead of brown smoke. Drain the chunks and wrap them in an aluminum foil packet thin enough to fit under the grates of your grill. Place under the grates and fire the grill up to as high as it will go. Give it 10 or 12 minutes to get nice and smokey.

    Salt, pepper, and olive oil the inside and outside of your fish (or, the skin side and flesh side of a fillet), add thyme if you’d like and stuff the fish with lemon chunks.

    Create a pan out of two layers of aluminum foil, put some olive oil, salt, and pepper in the pan, and lay the fish in. Put any vegies/mushrooms/extras in the packet and roll the pan closed, but leave an opening so that the smoke can get in.

    Bring your fish and veggie packet out to the grill and toss it on. Cook it until the flesh lightens in color and flakes easily. Its typically 8-12 minutes for a 1? thick 1lb fillet - use your judgment and make sure any fish you catch that is wild caught (even if its stocked) is cooked through.
    And another recipe I use, called "Wife Friendly Lake Trout" but it works on salmon as well

    Cut the fillet into strips about the size of chicken tenders.

    Mix one part Corn Starch, one part Corn Meal in a bag or on a plate

    Season to taste, I used Thyme, Cajun Seasoning (basically salt and pepper with different kinds of peppers), Onion Powder, Garlic Salt, Parsley, Smoked Paprika, and Crushed Red Peppers

    Crack one egg in a round bottom bowl or on a plate and scramble, I mix a little chipotle tobasco into the eggs for the flavor not the heat. (You can use Milk if you don't want to use eggs, takes some of the fishy taste out of stronger meat... didn't need it with the LT)

    Dip strips in egg so they're lightly coated

    Either dredge in the coating on the plate or "shake and bake" in a bag, paper bag prefered.

    Heat up oil in a pan. I like Peanut oil, but whatever you've got works. Butter and Olive oil burn at a low temperature so cook the food longer and make sure not to over heat the oil if you use those.

    Pan fry approximately 3 minutes per side or until golden brown.

    Serve with BBQ sauce of choice

    As for Vegetarian only - it can work but be sure you're consuming all of the necessary minerals/vitamins. My cousins (and a good friend) did this for several years but began introducing chicken and fish into their diet when they began losing hair and showed signs of muscle wasting, even while taking iron/vitamin supplements. I'm sure it still had something to do with some kind of imbalance as I know there are folks that have lived this way for 10's of years, but just be mindful of that.

    We aren't vegetarian but every piece of meat that we buy comes from within a 30 mile radius of where we live. And during the growing season, 80% of the vegetables we buy come from an even smaller radius. I can visit any of the farms that I'd like to and see what they are being fed and the conditions they are living in.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tortfeaser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    35
    Carl Lewis, Leroy Burrell (Fastest Men in the World) are macrobiotics. End of story for the meat-only protein people.

    Stay away from the American diet. You will never get headaches, your joints will stop swelling, arthritis will go away, skin improves, sleep improves, hair will stop falling out, mood improves. Dirk Benedict (Yup, Starbuck and Faceman) is a macrobiotic. He is in his sixties. He looks great.

    You are what you eat.

  21. #21
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,840
    Quote Originally Posted by hdo_1975
    .........a serving of fish daily if possible. Canned or packaged tuna is not ideal, but I may try to have a serving if I don't have time to prepare salmon or tilapia. Its a work in progress though.
    .

    i would definitely reccomend canned salmon over canned tuna. it's going to have lower mercury levels and more good fats. and taste better.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by hdo_1975
    Wise words. One visit to a feedlot would probably shock most people. Living in Oklahoma, I'm happy to see a lot more small scale organic, grass fed beef operations. Cattle were never meant to eat corn and hormone enchanced supplements.

    You own 12 bikes?

    More like 17, but not all complete bikes

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    7,878
    Quote Originally Posted by hdo_1975
    Character Zero,

    That is probably what I'm leaning towards. I'm eating almonds daily along with yogurt to help with protein intake. I've been eating a whole grain bagel - 170 calories with 8 grams protien and 9 grams of fiber - along with hummus every morning. I'm trying to limit my processed grains to that bagel. Otherwise its brown rice as a staple carb source.

    Next week I think I'm going to add a couple of egg whites for breakfast and try to work in a serving of fish daily if possible. Canned or packaged tuna is not ideal, but I may try to have a serving if I don't have time to prepare salmon or tilapia. Its a work in progress though.

    Staying under my daily calorie limit is very easy when you eat healthy. I'm actually struggling to eat enough calories now. Good problem to have considering my lifestyle up until this month.
    The problem with eating healthier is that you get more nutritious food. The more nutritious the food, the less you need to consume to keep going strong.

    That cycle is wonderful, and just the opposite of the meat/cheese/refined food cycle that leads to more food/sugar/protein cravings because the intake is so nutritionally deficient that it begets more of the same.

  24. #24
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    I'm not as complex as some of you, and I dont really have cooking ability just yet. I love smoked salmon and can eat it endlessly. I also like tuna. But unlike a lot of you, I like my breads. Not your empty wonderbread, but things like chibada, blackbread, wheat, oat and whole grain breads. I also like the yellow potato breads but I dont know what the world stance is on that.

    If like me, you dont have cooking ability, try doing things sandwich style. I love tuna salad on chibada, with dill pickles and hot sauce (dont dis till you try). Smoked salmon on chibada with letuce, onion, and olives is the bomb. You dont need stuff like butter or cream cheese with either, as salmon is juicy with omega 3, and tuna is usually plump with water.

    I eat a good bit of carbs as I subside on sandwiches, bagels, pasta, potatoes, and rice of all kinds. Fluffy white rice with some salty butter in it is a meal in itself. And fried rice in olive oil with Thai seasonings & sometimes egg, is just too tasty.

    For me, the diet that helps me feel better involves cutting out certain things that I know made me feel sick when I ate too much of them. I dont know, you might want to follow the same guide. This includes mayo, cheese, deep fried anything, fries, burgers, fatty steak, anything with substantial amounts of gelatin, candy, and anything with corn syrup. I also seldom tolerate Splenda, just for the taste alone, I prefer other sweeteners or none at all in my tea / coffee. I'm a heavy tea drinker, both hot and cold, and that might be a good and beneficial alternative for you if you cant pallet drinking so much plain water, as I had trouble, after so many years of coke & pepsi.

    Just my experience. I know others will recommend you stay away from breads and such, but its not the end of the world.. non-heavily-refined bread is a very good energy source and so is pasta and potatoes. Stay away from anything bleached and you should be good to go.
    Be excellent to each other.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    377
    You can make any diet successful if you hit your calorie goals. At the end of the day that is what it comes down to. Calories burned vs. calorie consumed. Tip that scale in your favor and you'll lose weight.

    As others have pointed out the one thing with a vegan diet is making sure you are getting proteins. Sure, you'll lose the weight. But if you lack enough protein your body will burn muscle to get it. So part of your weight loss will be muscle as well as fat. You want to do everything you can to keep the muscle that you have.

    You mention eating under 2000 calories AND going for a bike ride. That can be a bad recipe. I would hope you are eating more on those days to make up for the calories that you burn while riding. You don't want to end up with yo-yo dieting symptoms.

    As for meats, I feel they are just fine when following the rules. Good quality cuts and proper portions. Get a kitchen scale if you need to to weight the serving. People are uneducated when it comes to proper eating. Nothing wrong with eating a steak as long as it's within the rules. A serving of steak is about the size of a deck of cards. A lot of people get stakes 3-4 times larger than that. Chicken and fish servings are usually 4oz. A lot of people easily eat 1.5-2 times larger portion than they should. All comes back to portion control and moderation.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •