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  1. #1
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    Upgrade my Bridgestone or get a new one?

    Hi everyone. This is my first post here. I've been riding casually for the last 20 years. A little info about me. I'm 37 and 330 lbs., down from 375 last year. I usually bike during the summers only, and put a couple hundred miles on my bike each summer. Come fall/winter time (whenver the weather turns cold and rainy), it gets put away in the garage until the next spring.

    I'm riding a Bridgestone MB-4 that I got in about 1994. Actually the frame is a warranty replacement from a Bridgestone MB-5 that I bought new in about 1990. A lot of the components were replaced at that time too, but nothing since then (except for a new saddle, tires, etc.). My Bridgestone is in good condition, and I mainly do street riding or fire roads so nothing tough on the frame, and I've never pancaked rims or anything of that nature. I often ride with my daughter on a trail-a-bike behind me. My goal is to get 600 miles on my bike this summer.

    My questions is, if I have around $300-$400 to spend, should I upgrade my Bridgestone, or buy something like the Northrock XC-6 for $300 from Costco? My main reason for wanting to upgrade is to get a front fork with a shock. I'd love to go FS, but obviously my budget won't allow that.

    This is a pretty great forum, and I appreciate anyone willing to chime in on my situation!

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Joules's Avatar
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    I doubt any suspension fork you could easily buy today would fit on your bridgestone. In 1990 (actually, I think as long as Bridgestone sold bikes in the US) they used 1" threaded steerer forks, which basically aren't available anymore.

    Even if you could, that would be butchering a nice vintage bike. $3-400 doesn't buy you much, I'd be thinking used. That Costco bike you mentioned, either the fork is going to do nothing, or is going to be way too soft for you, and finding a firm enough spring is likely to be a challenge.

  3. #3
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    Unless you have $1000 plus dollars to spend, stick with your old bike, save your money, and keep the weight loss going. Any bike you buy for 300-400 will have a crappy fork that can't handle your weight.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch1413
    Unless you have $1000 plus dollars to spend, stick with your old bike, save your money, and keep the weight loss going. Any bike you buy for 300-400 will have a crappy fork that can't handle your weight.
    +1

    A Redline D440 would be the "entry level" bike I'd recommend for your size, it runs $700 and is full rigid like you already own.

  5. #5
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    Soul XC for $385, delivered. Not the greatest spec'd bike, but it will give you a solid platform to build on. While you don't get a lifetime frame warranty, it's a lot better than the costco bike, and it should hold up fine to the type of riding you are describing. http://www.hucknroll.com/rocky-mountain-soul-xc-bike


    I wouldn't mess with the bridgestone because

    A) It's "vintage."

    B) As mentioned, it uses funny parts.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the replies. I somehow figured that you bike snobs wouldn't be fond of the Costco bike. I didn't realize that Bridgestone used odd sizes so I couldn't easily upgrade the fork. I was kind of hoping beyond hope that the Costco bike would win some approval, but kind of resigned myself to the plan of upgrading the Bridgestone. I'm pretty sad now that both are off the table. I think that if I had a more comfortable ride I would get more miles.

    I guess now the question is what entry level bike would you recommend for me that has a front fork that can support my rather ample backside? I don't want to throw money away on a crappy bike, as this will more than likely be the last bike I ever buy, but I want to stay as economical as possible. Would $1000 get me there, as Sasquatch suggested? Just trying to guage how much I'll need to save up.

    Oh, and I'm just kidding about the "bike snobs" comment. That's just my jealousy showing through because I can't afford a rediculously awesome bike like most of you ride. If I could, then you'd be bike afficnaudios, not snobs! I really do appreciate and value your input.

  7. #7
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    Oh, one other question. Any idea what my Bridgestone would bring in if I sold it? When I'm ready to buy a new bike I could use that money to put toward the new bike also.

  8. #8
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    I've seen bikes at costco that I would ride if it came to that, the thing is, suspension is expensive, and when they put a suspension fork on a low end bike... well that's the entire budget for the bike, so everything else suffers, and the fork isn't great anyway.

    Keep an eye on chainlove, and your local craigslist for something used, once in a while you see a bike that hasn't really been used much, and someone just needs money. New, something like this: http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...el/7509/44107/
    I'd guess could serve you well for a while (bearing in mind of course that parts wear out)

    Value of your old bike depends a lot on it's condition and how original it is. Thumbshifters (the kind that go above the bar and just have a lever you move in either direction, not rapidfire) are generally worth something (I'd give you $50 for them right now, and you could probably do better on ebay). You might post some pictures of it in the vintage forum and ask what they think.

  9. #9
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    What are the opinions on this Felt Doubleshot with Rock Shox fork, hayes disk brakes, and Hussefelt crank arms for 300?

    http://bellingham.craigslist.org/bik/2267381800.html

  10. #10
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    Double shot is a DJ...I don't think the geometry is going to be what you are looking for, and it probably was the same for him. (Hence why the seat is sky high.)

  11. #11
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    I didn't realize that Bridgestone used odd sizes so I couldn't easily upgrade the fork.

    (Not odd, just outdated.)

    The Bridgestone is actually a pretty good bike. I'd be tempted to upgrade - I've had 2 over the years. I agree with otherrs - for similar quality you'll need to spend some coin.

    Is your riding style changing? Or do you just want a new bike? IMHO, unless you are spending most of your riding time on trails, front suspension isn't realy needed.

    Honestly, old bike, or new bike, as long as you ride and have fun....

    And, you might go to the vintage forum to ask about a price. Pricing used bikes can be a tough call.
    I was gonna stop by and see you, but the Jehovas witnesses came by. When they left I started drinking. Voicemail from Paul

  12. #12
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    Tekcor1, I am not certain exactly what you are looking for that will improve your riding? You mainly ride street and fire road, so the MB-4 is great for you. Getting a front suspension is not going to improve your ride on the street or even most fire roads. As a matter of fact, it could just rob some energy from you while you ride.

    Now, if you start riding trails, then a front suspension may help. In that case, it is best to buy a new (or newer used) bike. Your weight will limit the frame and fork that would be acceptable, so it may take some shoppin'.

    And just for info, I have a 1989 MB-1 that I would still be riding if the frame hadn't broke (OK, I broke it ).

    Good luck riding this summer. I hope you reach your goal.

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