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  1. #1
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    Trainer for Clyde

    Alrighty then. 6' 260lbs and looking to do some indoor riding. Been reading most everything I can about indoor trainers; the bordom, the leaking units, the noise etc etc. So I figure spend a bit more and get a good one. I'll have to order online cause nothing available locally for a decent price. Thought I found the deal I wanted on a Kurt Kinetic Road Machine for CDN$350 + $30 shipping and taxes for CDN$400 total. Then I found another place trying to dump their display model of the KK Rock and Roll which would total me CDN$560 shipped and taxes included. So my dilema is to go a bit cheaper and get the Road Machine or spend the extra for the better machine. I'm not a riding fanatic but do enjoy riding and need some winter time exersise besides the Xbox and internet LOL. Any help would be greatly appreciated and thank you in advance!
    Last edited by Sandman76; 01-27-2009 at 09:04 PM.
    Derrick.

  2. #2
    Re-friggin'-Lax!!!
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    Get the cheaper one, turn up the volume and play x-box while you spin...
    Seriously if you are just trying to get a bit of a base of fitness for the spring the cheaper on will do what you need.
    And I wasn't really kidding about the x-box thing... it can get mind-numbing riding a trainer.
    If necessity is the mother of invention, laziness is the deadbeat dad that knocked her up.

  3. #3
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    My experience is that just about all commercially available trainers are sturdy enough for even the biggest rider. The limitation of cheaper models is generally a limited resistance that an extremely strong rider might be able to exceed during hard efforts - potentially making less effective use of training time.

    Both of the machines you mentioned, however, will be enough resistance for just about anyone. THe Rock n Roll has a pivot built in so you get the advantage of practicing balance while training, although I do not know how much effort or concentration it requires, of if you will be riding at a 30 degree lean if you don't pay attention.

    I have ridden on both rigid trainers and plain rollers (balance and concentration required to not ride off the edge) and I think you can get a better workout by fixing the bike rigidly and just focusing on power output.

    FWIW, I have had best results by wearing headphones and using a hear rate monitor to cycle my body through multiple high intensity intervals. The last thing you should do, IN MY OPINION, is just ride the trainer for more than an hour at a fixed intensity, because that will cause your brain to explode with boredom. Although I have never tried playing video games while riding, that could be good. Play GTA and shoot some hookers while you ride
    "Newfoundland dogs are good to save children from drowning, but you must have a pond of water handy" - Josh Billings

  4. #4
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    Clarrification

    So perhaps save a hundred and sixty and get the rigid trainer? I did/do realize that the only option differnent on the Rock & Roll was the ability to rock side to side during hard pedaling but this feature can be locked out so the R&R can be used as a rigid trainer as well. Both offered at the prices I quoted above come with the Road Machine resistance unit, the R&R is not upgraded to the higher priced pro resistance unit.

    The other reason I was thinking the R&R would be better is less frame fatigue on by bike. 260lbs aprox 2 feet of leverage on the axel pin and rear frame section is a lot IMO. Again, help is appreciated in this decision!

    Thanks again!
    Derrick.

  5. #5
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    ...might consider rollers... you can get ones with resistance or you can fold a towel and lay it under the roller for a little resistance...

    right now i'm saving for one myself... trainer seems more logical as I plan to do intervals more then logging tons of miles... but honestly have no real imput as i've never used either.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandman76
    So perhaps save a hundred and sixty and get the rigid trainer? I did/do realize that the only option differnent on the Rock & Roll was the ability to rock side to side during hard pedaling but this feature can be locked out so the R&R can be used as a rigid trainer as well. Both offered at the prices I quoted above come with the Road Machine resistance unit, the R&R is not upgraded to the higher priced pro resistance unit.

    The other reason I was thinking the R&R would be better is less frame fatigue on by bike. 260lbs aprox 2 feet of leverage on the axel pin and rear frame section is a lot IMO. Again, help is appreciated in this decision!

    Thanks again!
    There have been a few trainers that are supposed to beasier on your frame, but I have never heard of a bike failing in a trainer.

    Maybe if you plan to do a lot of out-of-the-saddle sprints and are going to be intentionally wrenching the bike back and forth this could be an advantage, but otherwise a bike can handle it.

    What type of bike do you have? I will guess that a super-light frame will take this stress less well than a medium frame... probably a superlight aluminum frame will be worst, but it all depends on how the frame is made.
    I have a lightweight steel bike that I used a lot on a rigid trainer and it has lasted me many years.
    "Newfoundland dogs are good to save children from drowning, but you must have a pond of water handy" - Josh Billings

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by donalson
    ...might consider rollers... you can get ones with resistance or you can fold a towel and lay it under the roller for a little resistance...

    right now i'm saving for one myself... trainer seems more logical as I plan to do intervals more then logging tons of miles... but honestly have no real imput as i've never used either.
    I am currently using rollers and I enjoy the workout, as well as the ability to work on smoothing out my pedal stroke, but it is a little harder to get an intense workout... on a rigid trainer I used to give myself a heart-rate range to hit during intervals then just put my head down and hammer on the pedals to achieve it.... but if I did the same thing on my rollers I would probably lose concentration and ride off the edge. However, I have not had the rollers for too long and someone with more experience might have a different opinion.
    "Newfoundland dogs are good to save children from drowning, but you must have a pond of water handy" - Josh Billings

  8. #8
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    I have not tried it, but i don't really see the point in the rock and roll. Practice balance? If you can already trackstand, I don't see a trainer helping you improve your balance so that you will be any better on the trail. Plus, it takes up more room, as the base becomes very wide, so that it maintains stability while rocking.

    I've been happy with my KK. I got the pro model with the removable heavier flywheel, mainly because LBS had it in stock, and gave me a deal. After using it though, i don't think that the extra weight is worth the MSRP price increase. For the record though, I am not a clyde.

    The road machine is a great unit.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TobyNobody
    There have been a few trainers that are supposed to beasier on your frame, but I have never heard of a bike failing in a trainer.

    Maybe if you plan to do a lot of out-of-the-saddle sprints and are going to be intentionally wrenching the bike back and forth this could be an advantage, but otherwise a bike can handle it.

    What type of bike do you have? I will guess that a super-light frame will take this stress less well than a medium frame... probably a superlight aluminum frame will be worst, but it all depends on how the frame is made.
    I have a lightweight steel bike that I used a lot on a rigid trainer and it has lasted me many years.
    And old 90's erra Rocky Mountain Fusion. I think it's got a chromolly frame. Certainly not a clyde bike but it seems to work ok for me.
    Derrick.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandman76
    And old 90's erra Rocky Mountain Fusion. I think it's got a chromolly frame. Certainly not a clyde bike but it seems to work ok for me.
    I had a late 80's RM fusion I used as a winter bike for one year... toughass bike. A trainer will not harm a 5 pound taiwanese (or Japanese if early 90s, I think) made chromoly frame like that.
    "Newfoundland dogs are good to save children from drowning, but you must have a pond of water handy" - Josh Billings

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    I have not tried it, but i don't really see the point in the rock and roll. Practice balance? If you can already trackstand, I don't see a trainer helping you improve your balance so that you will be any better on the trail. Plus, it takes up more room, as the base becomes very wide, so that it maintains stability while rocking.

    I've been happy with my KK. I got the pro model with the removable heavier flywheel, mainly because LBS had it in stock, and gave me a deal. After using it though, i don't think that the extra weight is worth the MSRP price increase. For the record though, I am not a clyde.

    The road machine is a great unit.
    Thank you all for your input. I think I'll save the few bucks and just go to the KK Road Machine. Doesn't sound like the side to side movement of the KK R&R is worth the extra money even if it is cheaper than normal.

    Now to get to next payday and order it!
    Derrick.

  12. #12
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    I'm using a rigid trainer right now and the thing that's bothers me is I can see my frame flexing just behind the BB when the resistence is set high. I'm using a 2002 GT AVALANCHE 3.0, if it fails you'll be the first to know...

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