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  1. #1
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    Time to sh_t or get off the pot...

    A while back, I purchased a 2009 Rockhopper Comp Disc 29 (XL) with the intent to become a lesser Clyde.

    Well, excuse after excuse (work, family, weather, etc) and now the RH is gathering dust in the dining room. In addition, my last few rides resulted in much shoulder and wrist pain. Feels like I am leaning too far forward. Can someone recommend a taller/longer handlebar stem suitable for a 6'6" 390lbs Clydesdale?

    I need "fix" the RH so I can "fix" myself...or sell it.

    Thanks,

    Mark

  2. #2
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    I totally understand what you are talking about. Go to your local bike shop and the can order you a longer stem. Depending on your seat height you may want to get one with more of a rise. Don't let the skinny little 150lb guy in there make you feel bad. If he does, go to another shop. Stick with it. I'm sure that there is certain amount of discomfort that you will have to work through but ultimately you are making the right choice now. On my bike I ended up getting a longer stem with more rise, and a set back seat post. I also use bar ends that allow me to get my hands out a little farther. Bar ends also allow you to turn your wrists sideways which in turn gives you some different ways to put your hands so they aren't stuck in the same one the whole time.

  3. #3
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    You could just try a shorter stem - this will keep you from leaning too far forward.

  4. #4
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    I'm no fit expert, but I've come to realize how important slight changes in cockpit fitting can make or break a ride. When I feel too far forward, I look into bars with rear sweep on them. Right now I'm using the Salsa Whammy bar and really like it. It is very wide--which I would recommend to you at your size--and they have 11 degree backsweep. This changes the angle on your hands and brings them back closer to your body. You can get the Whammy bar with a rise or as a flat bar. If you want your handle bars higher, consider getting the riser bar. Also, if you feel too far forward, or stretched out, you actually might want a shorter stem. A longer stem is generally recommended if the bike cockpit feels too small for you. That's not the impression I get from your post, but maybe I'm wrong. The shorter stem, swept bars and risen bars will give you a more "upright" feel while riding. This will take some of the weight off your handlebars. Good luck. The more you ride and get used to the bike the less pain you will feel.

  5. #5
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    Definitely get a shorter stem - this will improve bike handling as well. Now is a good time of year to find cheap parts. And try lowering your seat.

    Also start doing some pushups to build up your shoulders and chest, even if you have to do them on your knees.

  6. #6
    AZ
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    A good starting point would be some fitting help from your LBS. I am sure that they can get you started in the right direction in short order. Good luck to you.

  7. #7
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    Look into Ergon grips. They have helped my wrists immensly. Also, make sure you have your front fork set up right. You can ride with it locked out which should add some height to your front end.

  8. #8
    native.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    A good starting point would be some fitting help from your LBS. I am sure that they can get you started in the right direction in short order. Good luck to you.
    +1
    Don't start throwing money at the bike until you've had a fitter at your LBS see you on the bike. Lots of options out there,just as there are lots of preferences in riding position.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the input...I think I will toss it in the truck and head on down to the LBS. Seem to recall a service plan was included in the price of the bike. I will talk to the "fitter" when I am there,

    MSW

  10. #10
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    Though I gave you advice on the handlebars and whatnot, you're absolutely doing the right thing by taking the bike in and having bike shop dudes take a look at it with you. Cockpit fit has many variables. The posters who recommended you take the bike in to your LBS are spot on.

  11. #11
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    Good call on getting your bike set up correctly, but I strongly second the Ergon grip suggestion as well. I struggled with wrist pain for a long time, just chalked it up to a pretty bad motocross accident I had years ago and broke both wrists pretty severely. A guy at my LBS suggested them and I will not ride without them now. No wrist pain at all. They're great.

  12. #12
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    as has been mentioned small changes can make a BIG difference...

    my back would kill me by the end of my 10 mile loop untill I raised my bars 5mm (or was it 2.5mm?) simply by re-aranging my headset spacers...

    sounds like you are reaching to far... things you can do to fix that... raise the bar up, pull the bar bag (shorter stem), more bar sweep, shorten the bars/get narrower bars, move your saddle forward, increase fork travel...

    ALL of these will effect something else... in some cases you get to much weight off the front and the front will slide around like crazy in the turns... also you can/will need to soften the fork settings if you get weight off of it... moving the saddle is a poor option that I don't recommended to fix reach...

    as mentioned... if you can get to a shop and see about getting better fitted to your bike... once you are in the right general area of proper fit it takes only a very small change to be perfect or horrid... but for that fine little adjustments you won't really notice the difference untill you've spent a bit of time in the saddle... going from the current setup to something that is close will be night and day
    - Surly Disc trucker
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