Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hrhitter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    67

    super clyde spokes

    I ride a 29" redline monocog. I bought it new and I've been breaking spokes recently. I'm riding on the road the last month because of the rain and i'm breaking about 2 a week on the rear wheel.

    Metal fatigue is probably the culprit so I'm gonna relace the rear wheel.


    what are the strongest spokes I can get for the wheel?


    blessings

    Steve

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vk45de's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,084
    I found some 12g, not sure if they have it for 29ers. Probably more than anyone needs. You'll probably have rim problems with those as well.
    http://www.danscomp.com/435925.php

  3. #3
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Once the breaking starts, it tends to continue. No doubt your monocog came with a machine built wheel using no name spokes.

    In most cases, a handbuilt wheel with even tension and DT Comp spokes will do the trick. DT Alpine spokes are even stronger, but many hubs will not except them.

  4. #4
    29 some of the time...
    Reputation: AL29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,945
    Straight gauge 14g/2.0mm spokes and brass nipples are a very robust combination. Inexpensive too While you are in there rebuilding, I would recommend a more robust rim as well. No point in relacing a soft/light duty rim up with stiff spokes. Save yourself a few headaches and pick up a stronger rim. With a good rim, quality spokes/nipples, and a good build you will be amazed at how long a wheel can last
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  5. #5
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Straight gauge 14g/2.0mm spokes and brass nipples are a very robust combination.
    DB 2.0/1.8 are actually less prone to break at the elbows than strait gauge 2.0 due to better stress distribution along the length of the spoke.

  6. #6
    29 some of the time...
    Reputation: AL29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,945
    True, butted spokes do generate less stress on the spoke bend and head. They do this by stretching and flexing more. For a big rider this flex may or may not be an issue. I prefer straight gauge spokes. A well built wheel will have no issue with straight gauge spokes and it will be stiffer to boot. Since this is for a single speed the stiffness and lack of wind-up is a good thing IMO.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •