Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    231

    Strong Bakes for Heavy Riders???

    So I am 5'9" and 245lbs. I currently have some Hayes Stroker Trails with Goodridge hoses, and 180mm rotors. The power feels average, but no matter how much brake I grab their not strong enough to lock the wheels. They are highly prone to brake fade when riding a long steep descent, and the pads and rotors regularly glaze over causing the brakes to squeel. I'm getting tired of removing the pads and wheels after every ride to sand down the glaze. I need some stronger brakes which are less prone to brake fade. What brakes are strong enough for heavy riders like me???

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,189
    203f 180r rotors with some nice pads should do the trick. Otherwise I have some XTR's that do the trick and I have 40# on you.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    203f 180r rotors with some nice pads should do the trick. Otherwise I have some XTR's that do the trick and I have 40# on you.
    I'm reading alot of good things on the 2012 XT's, but their not available yet. It's got pretty much all the features of the XTR for half the price.

  4. #4
    Dirt Deviant
    Reputation: savagemann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,694
    I've got about 50lbs on you and run the Stroker Trails. 203f 185r
    They will fade out a bit on crazy long descents but I've never had a shortage of stopping power.
    I run Kool Stop pads, but to be totally honest, I don't feel like it made a big difference over the stock pads.
    Make sure they are bled with a quality DOT 5.1 fluid.
    I use MOTUL 5.1 and that actually made a noticeable difference in the fading. Seriously.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  5. #5
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,906
    Any disc brake set should be able to lock up the wheels without too much problem, or it's not functioning properly. If you have to apply a death grip to lock up the wheels, it's still not right.

    On a properly functioning unit, some of the things that will generally help are (in no particular order):

    - larger rotors

    - larger pad surface

    - different pad materials

    - four small pistons instead of two larger ones

    Four piston designs (all else being relatively equal) do a couple things. They allow a larger pad surface to be used, and they move the (theoretical) leverage arm a little further away from the axle when using the same size rotor.

    A couple of examples are Shimano Saint or Avid Code disc brake sets.

    http://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...new_saint.html

    http://www.sram.com/avid/products/co...lic-disc-brake

    IMHO, a good two piston design should be all you need for most riding if your rotors are sized appropriately. But if you want power in spades, go for the four piston calipers.
    Last edited by jeffj; 07-05-2011 at 10:55 AM.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    Any disc brake set should be able to lock up the wheels without too much problem, or it's not functioning properly. If you have to apply a death grip to lock up the wheels, it's still not right.

    On a properly functioning unit, some of the things that will generally help are (in no particular order):

    - larger rotors

    - larger pad surface

    - different pad materials

    - four small pistons instead of two larger ones

    Four piston designs (all else being relatively equal) do a couple things. They allow a larger pad surface to be used, and they move the (theoretical) leverage arm further away from the axle when using the same size rotor.

    A couple of examples are Shimano Saint or Avid Code disc brake sets.

    http://bike.shimano.com/publish/cont...new_saint.html

    http://www.sram.com/avid/products/co...lic-disc-brake

    IMHO, a good two piston design should be all you need for most riding if your rotors are sized appropriately. But if you want power in spades, go for the four piston calipers.
    Well my strokers offer sufficient power but it is far from ideal. I can get the wheels to lock with enough grip while riding on flat ground but as soon as the trails gets steep the force of my weight pushing down the hill is far greater than the force applied by the brake piston. I can slow down well enough but on a descent I can't ever lockup my brakes. I don't know if this is normal (My LBS said my levers felt normal), but my levers move through 40-50% of their stroke before they bite. When I rode a Specialized Enduro loner bike from my LBS equiped with Avid Elixer CR, it grabbed right away maybe 15% into the lever stroke and it felt Firm but still had good modulation. I was able to lockup with Enduro.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann View Post
    I've got about 50lbs on you and run the Stroker Trails. 203f 185r
    They will fade out a bit on crazy long descents but I've never had a shortage of stopping power.
    I run Kool Stop pads, but to be totally honest, I don't feel like it made a big difference over the stock pads.
    Make sure they are bled with a quality DOT 5.1 fluid.
    I use MOTUL 5.1 and that actually made a noticeable difference in the fading. Seriously.
    Are you running sintered pads or organic?? Do you experience your pads and rotors glazing often?? Do your levers feel snappy and quick to bite?? My levers always felt a bit off, it takes half of the lever's stroke to get an initial bite, and they don't feel FIRM but they don't feel soft and spongy it's like in the middle. Like even when the brake gets that Bite I can still apply more pressure and pull the lever even closer to the bar but not all the way. Just wondering if this is normal for the strokers.

  8. #8
    Dirt Deviant
    Reputation: savagemann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,694
    I'm running sintered metal kool stop part# KS-D250S pads.
    Like I said, they didn't feel much different from the stock pads.
    If you compare the Strokers to the Elixirs, the Elixirs have WAY more bite.
    IMO, too much.
    Some say the Strokers feel "wooden" compared to avid brakes.
    I would agree with this....and I prefer this feel.
    With avid brakes, when I was going over very bumpy terrain I found myself jarring the brakes and almost throwing myself over the bars when I wasn't even trying to brake. They are very sensitive.
    I prefer the feel of the Strokers since I have to pull a bit harder to lock the wheels up.
    I've never had any problems locking up my wheels, regardless of the steepness of the hill.
    BUT, I have had some issues with fading on long, steep descents.
    There is one section of trail I ride that is about 1/2mile long and around a 42% grade. So steep it is hard to hike up.
    Going down this section, I have to stop afterwards and let the brakes cool down.
    Yesterday, we were doing this swoopy, fast trail that has alot of up and down, but several of the downs are 20-30% grade and extend for a couple minutes each.
    At the very end of the trail where we rest is at the bottom of a 3 minute descent that gets very steep near the end.
    My brakes work fine throughout the section, but when I get to the bottom I have to pull pretty hard to come to a stop......harder than normal.
    On another ride we do we have a 9 minute descent, and I'm on the brakes pretty hard, but the pitch is much less around 10-20% and I have no problems at all here.
    When I was in downieville last summer I had 0 brakes issues, and there are some descents that my hands were going numb from being on the brakes so much.
    I haven't really had any issues with glazing. I have glazed my avid brakes several times though.
    I would say my levers pull about halfway before they really bite. But I have them set that way on purpose. You can alter the fluid level when bleeding to change the bite point.
    I would say you need a bleed just to be on the safe side. It should help the feel at the lever.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    231
    I'm gonna try flushing out the dot 4 and putting in dot 5.1 and maybe going up to 203mm rotor in the front. does it hurt if the new 5.1 mixes with the dot 4 residue still left in the system???

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpeters's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,330
    I am 240 and I was using Tektro Auriga Comp 180 160 and it was fine I just upgraded the stock pads to EBC green stuff I also run hays stroker trails with no problems. I think if the hydros are set up good with good pads and rotors that most brakes will do the job some have more modulation than others. The tektros I have are like 80 bucks and they are great they just need to be clean and lubed properly I have never had problems stopping. The stock pads on the tektros were crap but after I replaced them they worked perfect. I think a lot of the money on brakes is spent on weight loss and bling most important thing is pads. My 80 dollar brakes with new pads stop just as good as my 200 dollar brakes.

  11. #11
    Is that Bill rated?
    Reputation: Lord Humongous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    440
    If your brakes won't stop the wheels they have a problem. I run 240 and even 160f140r lets me lock up. Heat is an issue with rotors that size, but stopping power is there. I regularly run 200f160r and have no issues with older 2 piston XT/Saints and they aren't exactly high on the power compared to the current crop.
    I have had no good experiences with Hayes brakes, whether Stroker or Mags, just figured mine were lemons.
    Well, it was a good try.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    34
    Try Avid BB7's with the speed dial levers. These work like a charm with the 185mm rotors they came with. I'm 6'5",270lbs & I set these up to stop me on a dime. Great modulation too.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Strong Bakes for Heavy Riders???-2011-07-09-11.44.29.jpg  


Similar Threads

  1. DT Swiss X1800 Wheels: strong, or just heavy?
    By 251 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-18-2009, 04:27 AM
  2. Strong wheelset for a heavy rider???
    By HOLLYWOOD33 in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-06-2009, 11:53 AM
  3. Monkey... which one? Bars for a heavy/strong clyde
    By eightballrj in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-28-2008, 05:19 AM
  4. Whats a strong and not too heavy rim for XC?
    By blue_neon in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-11-2006, 07:59 AM
  5. Heavy dude's and heavy duty riders, need your opinion
    By I_8_It_up in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 04-12-2004, 09:03 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •