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  1. #1
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    So I'm taking the plunge into clipless... Clyde-worthy equipment on a budget?

    I've decided that I'm going to try and take the plunge into clipless.. what Clyde-worthy shoes and pedals can I get on a budget? ... I'm on a tight one, hoping for less than $100 for both. Tell me if I'm nuts for this range, but also something you could recommend.

    I got size 13, wide... feet.. I've had someone recommend Lake shoes, but they seem pricey, and I cant find a place around here that sells them to try. I'd hate to buy online and realize it wont work out.

    Any solid Pedal recommendations or compatibility things I should look out for?
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  2. #2
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    for the price shimano's are hard to beat for a clyd... but $100 for both shoes and pedals may be a bit tough with a big wide foot...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by donalson
    for the price shimano's are hard to beat for a clyd... but $100 for both shoes and pedals may be a bit tough with a big wide foot...
    which shimanos should I be looking at in particular for my 306# frame? ...
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  4. #4
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    SPD-M540s or 520s work great for me and I've been up around 300 before.

    The 520s are a bit cheaper so those are probably your best bet, they should be under $50 I think, the 540s are around $75.
    Due to a lack of interest, tomorrow has been canceled

  5. #5
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    the cheap ones ... 520's like kyoseki mentioned...

    i've also been having good luck with the nashbar clipless (they are actualy the wellgo/ritchey copies)... they use the same cleat as the shimanos which is nice
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  6. #6
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    Random thoughts;

    Even weight aside the 540s I'm running are bombproof, I've clipped I don't know how many rocks with the things and they're still going strong.

    The 520s are almost identical (I know they have a black body instead of raw steel, but apart from that what's the difference?) so I'm sure they'll hold up great as well.

    I actually have a pair of Time Ulteam RXS Carbon Ti pedals (yes, I was drunk when I ordered them) on my road bike (which is also carbon) and have so far managed to avoid breaking anything on that either, but I'm sure it's only a matter of time
    Due to a lack of interest, tomorrow has been canceled

  7. #7
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    Time Aliums

    Cheap, reliable, and could probably survive a nuclear (not nucular) holocaust

    Here's a combo for you at $100

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Time Aliums

    Cheap, reliable, and could probably survive a nuclear (not nucular) holocaust

    Here's a combo for you at $100
    I'm running the Time Aliums *and* I'm wearing (as I write this...) the Sette Epic shoe. The Alium pedals have proven worthy of my abuse (several wrecks) without damage to the structure of the pedal. I went with the Time Aliums based on the feedback I received in this thread:

    Clipless Clydes with Bad Knees
    Clipless Clydes with Bad Knees

    As for the shoes, I was pleasantly surprised with the Settes. For me, they run true to size in length and have a wider toe box than many (most?) other cycling shoes. The sole is stiff but *not* so stiff that it could prevent hiking nasty sections of trail when necessary. The lugs are large and solid, and shed mud well.

    The structure of the Sette Element shoe looks almost identical to the Epics that I'm wearing. I wouldn't hesitate to purchase another pair of Epics or try a pair of the Elements; for the price, I think they're a bargain.

  9. #9
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    well, that does it for me. That combo is nice and the pedals and shoes both received good reviews on this site independently, I just hope the size is right for my 13 wide, so I'm ordering a 48, which is 13.5 they list. Hope its like a 13 wide. Wish I knew more precisely the shoe I'm wearing now.
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  10. #10
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    just e-mailed their support with that question, thx guys, helpful as always.
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  11. #11
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    Sette Epic Mountain Bike Shoes

    Because I'm a total nerd, here are a few shots of the Sette Epic shoes:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
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    nice kicks

    now if only their support could respond to me with a size recommendation
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  13. #13
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    I typically purchase size 13 D/E when buying normal athletic shoes (New Balance). My foot is more realistically a 12.5, but too frequently it's hard to find the right combination of length/width in that particular size.

    That being said, I purchased size 48 in the Sette Epics because I was concerned that the toe box would be too small like so many other cycling shoes. Size 48, according to Pricepoint's chart is a U.S. size 13.5. In retrospect, I could have *easily* fit into a size 47of the Settes.

    Don't you just love buying without trying?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dog.gone
    I typically purchase size 13 D/E when buying normal athletic shoes (New Balance). My foot is more realistically a 12.5, but too frequently it's hard to find the right combination of length/width in that particular size.

    That being said, I purchased size 48 in the Sette Epics because I was concerned that the toe box would be too small like so many other cycling shoes. Size 48, according to Pricepoint's chart is a U.S. size 13.5. In retrospect, I could have *easily* fit into a size 47of the Settes.

    Don't you just love buying without trying?
    yea, I fit a 12.5 wide too.. not making this process easy =/ .. still waiting for their rep to get back to me.
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  15. #15
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    3 days and 2 e-mails, I cant get in contact with pricepoint using their own "have any questions?" feature right under the item description.. I asked some basic questions too =/ like about the return policy and all.

    poo.. I wanted them sooner rather than later.
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  16. #16
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    thats funny, they responded to me like an hour after that post.
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  17. #17
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    just purchased the combo, size 47, I'll report in when they get here.
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  18. #18
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    I've been running Shimano SPD clipless pedals for 10 years now without any problems. Banged off rocks, concrete steps, etc... I've riden them as high as 296lbs and they've been flawless (and still are!) no matter what I've thrown at them. They look basically like the m520's but unsure of the model number due to the age.

    I see you went along with something different and I hope they serve you as well as mine have served me

  19. #19
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    My shoes and pedals are in! ... too bad it was after 5:30 when i came back from work.. I had to get to the cycling class at the gym, and didnt get a chance to set everything up.

    The size 47 fits perfect with room at the tip, but slightly tight on the side of the toes, but I expect it to loosen up.. to test this out before putting on the metal cleats, I ate dinner with the shoes on, and walked around the house with em.

    I just have 2 questions.

    1) The metal clip plates that came with the Time ATAC.. what is the difference as to whether I screw them into the first or 2nd set of 2 holes, from the top of my shoes? .. how do I chose the better position? or is it all by feel?

    2) What are the 2 metal cleats at the top of each shoe for that you have to screw in? Just extra traction or some specific purpose?

    Omg, I get to ride clipless for the first time ever tomorrow!
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  20. #20
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    1) Most riders prefer to have the ball of their foot over the center (axle) of the pedal...there are two sets of holes plus the plate slides to provide a range of adjustment. BTW since your new to clipless, put the Time cleats on so you have a release angle of 15* instead of 20*. This will make them a little easier to get out of. Once it becomes second nature, then most riders prefer the 20* release angle

    2) Those are cleats and they do help in areas that require a little hike and bike on loose or muddy soil. That said I also run them simply because they help protect the front sole of the shoe when walking, thus the shoe last longer,

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    1) Most riders prefer to have the ball of their foot over the center (axle) of the pedal...there are two sets of holes plus the plate slides to provide a range of adjustment. BTW since your new to clipless, put the Time cleats on so you have a release angle of 15* instead of 20*. This will make them a little easier to get out of. Once it becomes second nature, then most riders prefer the 20* release angle

    2) Those are cleats and they do help in areas that require a little hike and bike on loose or muddy soil. That said I also run them simply because they help protect the front sole of the shoe when walking, thus the shoe last longer,
    thank you.

    I had a similar suspicion about #1.. that most power would be transferred through the ball under the big toe.. just like in Karate .. I'll perfect the adjustment when I get home.

    Your explanation of the metal cleats makes more sense than my theory about bikers being able to defend themselves by kicking in two "vampire-like holes" into a muggers chest with their powerful legs... I guess sharpening them is out of the question then
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  22. #22
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    I'm a size 14.5 and went with Lake MX165 shoes and Crank Brother Candy C pedals. Researched the heck out of things and this combo was the best bang for the buck I could find.

  23. #23
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    Thats my first 2 13-mile rides with clipless so far... good stuff. Still getting use to mounting and dismounting. I set them up with 13 degree release and its easier. They are really long, longer than my normal shoes, and while they appear thinner, the 47 size is actually right on for my US size 13 feet. I was SUPER worried about the fact that I wear *wide specific shoes and these looked so thin.. I am very pleased to say that after a total of 26 miles, no foot complaints, they are very comfy. It occurred to me that they can either be comfy, or maybe I'm not feeling the necessity for width because I'm not "stepping" with them, just with the ball of my foot, at the end of a very stiff & inflexible shoe bottom. But hell, why question a good thing.

    The Sette Element have a mesh top, and I feel wind between my toes now.. its awkward, but good feeling, in a refreshing sort of way... if you dont think about the rain and boats..

    I'm starting to like that site.. I picked up a set of Vexx3 glasses, a Camelbak hawg, a pair of fox gel gloves to help with persistent numbness, and a belt. Thanks for turning me on to it. Cant wait for the gloves and glasses, I have major problems with massive clouds of gnats on my dusk rides. I once rode through in the rain with a wet shirt, when I got home it was moving and plastered with gnats. Nasty.

    The lenses for the glasses.. I know the smoke ones are for heavy sunlight, the clear are for night, but I forget what the orange lenses were for? .. cloudy days? (mix) ?

    PS: I tightened my front tire clasp and it rarely makes sound, combined with these silent shoes, I'm in audio heaven, I no longer feel the need for headphones.
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  24. #24
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    Orange lenses for low light like dusk time. It really makes things brighten up. I use them for low light shooting at the range.

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