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  1. #1
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    Should I be loyal to my LBS ((5'10'' 320lbs))

    Im 5'10" 320lbs I'm wanting to buy a bike 50% street 50% trails
    2013 Fuji Nevada 1.3 29er
    msrp: $889
    components "seem" real good compared to others in this (on sale) price range

    LBS
    - awesome customer service (spent 1 hour giving me advice on what fits me best for my riding style and educating me on mountain bikes)
    - $719 before taxes (on sale)
    - 1 year tune ups and service

    Performance Bikes
    - 0 customer service (just want to sell me any bike, didn't seem as knowledgeable)
    - $599 before taxes (on sale)

    Should I buy at Performance Bike and just get it tuned and serviced and LBS when the time comes. Or as everyone says support my LBS... but I save $130 upfront if I buy from PB.

    Is this a good bike for my weight? Any recommendations?
    Last edited by kanyewesttx; 02-12-2014 at 12:54 PM. Reason: shorter version

  2. #2
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    Ultimately, it is up to you. While you can argue that having a relationship with the local shop may pay off in the long run, I find that the folks at the 2 Performance stores near me (Ft Worth and Southlake) are quite friendly and very knowledgeable. I wouldn't hesitate buying a bike from them and returning to them for service after the sale. That said, if you do buy from them, buy the Performance Buyer Club membership. $20 which includes a year subscription to Bicycling (I find it a very enjoyable read) and you get 10% back for a future purchase on everything you buy. They run specials for extra money back from time to time (like 20% on clothing right now). I also find that performance is the ONLY local shop I can get some clothes that actually fit for riding. So if you buy the bike from them, I would also look to get at least a pair of shorts (wear loose training shorts over lycra bike shorts if nothing else). Spend $599 on the bike plus $20 on the membership, get $60 back in rewards ($40 "profit"). Return to the store in a couple of days and use that $60 to buy you a pair of good cycling shorts (I wear Pearl Izumi Elite shorts). It goes on and on. I really like them for clothing and various accessories, the 10% back (they just had 20% back on bikes a couple of weeks ago) makes me like them.

    As for the other LBS, having a relationship with them is nice too. You are not going to be doing too many tune ups in a year and you may find that the included service doesn't include the things you need (like truing wheels). They will know who you are and will be happy to see you. I have had dodgy service from 2 shops around here that I bought bikes from ($3K and $2K at the shops) which may not be tons of money to them, but I expected a little better service after that. The shop I bought my wife's bike (another $3K) at has always treated me great no matter how busy they are and recognize me every time I visit. They are almost an hour away from me, so they are hardly a LOCAL BS for me.

    Of course, your mileage may vary.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  3. #3
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    I know that after buying multiple bikes from the same shop...I don't pay msrp any more, on bikes or other items. They also treat me better if I need to take my bike into the shop which admittedly isn't often as I do my own wrenching 99% of the time. So...while this initial purchase might cost you more, it could save you down the road.

    That said...I did just buy a new bike from a large retail store...REI. I bought a Cannondale Synapse road bike. Why? Because first, my regular LBS doesn't sell Cannondale, they are a Specialized/Trek dealer. I really wanted a Synapse. There is a Cannondale dealer in town and the guys that work there are really cool...but they were charging me msrp for the Synapse which was kinda expected...I got the bike from REI out the door for about $100 less than msrp (about $200 less than the LBS after taxes charged), I have a year to ride the bike and return it if I don't like it, and I get $250 back next year for purchasing the bike at REI.

    So, I kinda went against what I normally would do but sometimes money does talk. If it was just a hundred bucks or so...but when the savings in more in the neighborhood of $450...that's a hard pill to swallow in the name of shop loyalty...especially when it's a new shop that I would have to build a new relationship with from zero.

    So I probably didn't help much...I'd say that if you think you'll end up buying new bikes in the future and this dealer has bike brands you'll likely buy again...I'd probably start building that relationship. If not...save some cash and go with Performance. Free tune-ups really don't mean anything to me personally...wrenching is easy and a skill that anyone even a tiny bit serious about riding should learn. Really it's a money talks issue. If you think you can save over the long run and get better service...LBS. If quick savings works for you with little to no service...big box store.

  4. #4
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    Specially been that heavy I will stay with your LBS, god knows you are going to have a ton of issues, specially with cheap wheels and brakes..

    If anything I will save some money and get a bike with better components since they do make a difference in longevity and also performance (think brakes)

  5. #5
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    Kanye,

    The average rider requires 1tune up per year. There is a benefit to having 1 local mechanic handle all.the wrench work... he will be familiar with any kinks that may develop. Unlike a chain store where there are several mechanics in rotation, the service is a little less personal. Stuff to watch out for with a new bike : keeping the wheels true, cable tension, brakes tight, bolt check. We call this the break in period. Shifter cables stretch a little bit, wheels go out of true, spokes get loose from the brake forces on the non - drive side, disc brake bolts need to be torqued down as well as all the other bolts around the bike. Bikes are " quality checked " from the Fuji factory, but it takes a knowledgeable mechanic to finish the final assembly. Your regular mechanic will be familiar with all the little quirks that can develop. The Alivio 8 speed drivetrain is a good choice for a work duty level bike. Not the lightest drivetrain package, but defintely very sturdy and reliable. This stuff can eat a bike crash and a beating and keep on rolling.
    If you should ever have the need to remove the wheels for a flat repair or adjustment, DO NOT SQUEEZE THE HYADRAULIC BRAKES! They don't like to be compressed when not assembled, it messes up the rebound and you will have a little brake drag. Also be very careful not to splash any oil on the brake rotor becausenit ruins the pads and kills the stopping power. Like when you oil your chain, be sure to wipe the excess and do not let oil smear or splash on the rotor.

  6. #6
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    I say talk to your LBS. Explain your situation and see hwat they can do.(make sure you don't come across as a cheap person, just let them know that money is tight and you want to get the best deal possible) I try to buy local almost all of the time. I use performance for tools and clothes most of the time. But as far as bikes I buy from LBS. I drive 45 minutes one way to mine. I don't have to take mine in for service work since I do most of my maintainence and repairs myself. But having a good relationship with my LBS helps when I get jammed up.
    Vincit qui patitur
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by owtdorz View Post
    I say talk to your LBS. Explain your situation and see hwat they can do.(make sure you don't come across as a cheap person, just let them know that money is tight and you want to get the best deal possible) I try to buy local almost all of the time. I use performance for tools and clothes most of the time. But as far as bikes I buy from LBS. I drive 45 minutes one way to mine. I don't have to take mine in for service work since I do most of my maintainence and repairs myself. But having a good relationship with my LBS helps when I get jammed up.
    This ^^^ they should be able to work with you on the price. Usually the manager or owner will make that call.

  8. #8
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    Only issue in this case is that the bike in question is already on sale. I'd guess if they do anything...they might give a discount on accessories (which many shops do when you buy a new bike) or even throw something in for free. Can't hurt to ask for sure. If they don't want to help out in any way other than the basically useless one year of tune-ups...well...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kanyewesttx View Post
    Im 5'10" 320lbs I'm wanting to buy a bike 50% street 50% trails
    2013 Fuji Nevada 1.3 29er
    msrp: $889
    components "seem" real good compared to others in this (on sale) price range

    LBS
    - awesome customer service (spent 1 hour giving me advice on what fits me best for my riding style and educating me on mountain bikes)
    - $719 before taxes (on sale)
    - 1 year tune ups and service

    Performance Bikes
    - 0 customer service (just want to sell me any bike, didn't seem as knowledgeable)
    - $599 before taxes (on sale)

    Should I buy at Performance Bike and just get it tuned and serviced and LBS when the time comes. Or as everyone says support my LBS... but I save $130 upfront if I buy from PB.

    Is this a good bike for my weight? Any recommendations?
    I think you'd be nuts not to buy from your LBS. You said their service is awesome and they spent a lot of time explaining things to you. Sounds like they earned their $130. I started out 100# heavier than you and am now about your weight. I'm into my LBS at least once a week. You will need service if you spend any time on the bike. Keep your money in the community and reward a good shop.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    I know that after buying multiple bikes from the same shop...I don't pay msrp any more, on bikes or other items. They also treat me better if I need to take my bike into the shop which admittedly isn't often as I do my own wrenching 99% of the time. So...while this initial purchase might cost you more, it could save you down the road.
    I know this is true with my local music store. I get a better deal there than I can anywhere online plus if I'm not really happy I can easily bring something back. I think the fact that this seems like a first bike having that relationship will serve you well when upgrade-itis kicks in.

  11. #11
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    OK guys thanks for the input. So I called them today and told em about the prices I saw at PB and they hooked me up. My LBS said they could do $656 before taxes and it still includes the 1 year free tune up and service and they also said they would switch out the stock seat for free if it was uncomfortable.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Can't beat that. Still a little more than Performance but the new relationship will be worth much more in the long run. Also sounds like a good shop if they were willing to drop the price on a bike already on sale plus the tune ups plus the seat exchange.

  13. #13
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    Awesome results. Get in good with your local bike shop and tbey will treat you well. Maybe show them some appreciation by suprise delivery of a good beer. Make them happy and they will make you happy.
    Saddles are like shoes : they all serve the same purpose, each style fits differently, has different features, ergonomic designs, etc. Find the one that works best for you. With a new bike tbe saddle is generally a one size fits most type of deal. But there are options to consider like drop nose, groove relief, gel padding, width, length, shape, springs, etc. Happy trails.

  14. #14
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    $130 is nothing……buy from LBS and have piece of mind that they will be there to service you. If you ride a lot, you will need them….they will have the proper tools to get you back on the the trail.

  15. #15
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    Sucks your performance shop is like that. Before I moved, my local performance shop was excellent. They worked with customers to make sure they got what they wanted. Plus the bike mechanic had the reputation of being the best in the county (had another LBS refer me to him for some work I needed done).

    That said, I would spent more for better service at the LBS.
    Cant really put a dollar amount on good service

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfdog93 View Post
    $130 is nothing……buy from LBS and have piece of mind that they will be there to service you. If you ride a lot, you will need them….they will have the proper tools to get you back on the the trail.
    IMO...if you ride alot, you should learn to work on your own bike. Of course it's nice to have some support if you are in a time crunch and don't have time to do the work...drop the bike off in the morning before work, pick it up after work kinda deal, or something that maybe you can't do, but for 99% of the wrenching required on a bike, most people should be able to do the work at home.

    Of course there's some that can't be bothered to maintain their own bike.

  17. #17
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    After having just purchased my first bike in over 15 years, I have to say I really like going the LBS route.

    I bought 2 bikes, 2 helmets, 2 light sets and other little odds and ends. The sales person really didn't like the lights I was picking out, saying they weren't strong enough, but I couldn't afford the nicer lights he was suggesting.

    The manager heard our discussion and came over and started discounting everything. In the end I walked out with about $1750 worth of product (including the nicer lights, tag price, not including tax) for $1500 and some change, including tax.

    I'm also getting the Trek warranty of the frames which I think is awesome and lifetime tunes/adjustments (not including major work, parts swaps, wheel truing)

    Couldn't be happier.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    IMO...if you ride alot, you should learn to work on your own bike. Of course it's nice to have some support if you are in a time crunch and don't have time to do the work...drop the bike off in the morning before work, pick it up after work kinda deal, or something that maybe you can't do, but for 99% of the wrenching required on a bike, most people should be able to do the work at home.

    Of course there's some that can't be bothered to maintain their own bike.
    Sure, you need to learn the basics and maintain your own bike, I do the same. But as newbie you won't have some of the specialty tools, such as torque wrench (expensive), extracting device(s) etc.

  19. #19
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    I've built four bikes from bare frame. Only special tool I've needed is a bottom bracket tool and and a crank puller (which isn't needed on many newer bikes) and those tools were cheap enough. I sprung for a chain whip and cassette lock ring tool and that was worth the money but it's not 100% needed. Otherwise...basic hand tools will get 99% of the work done unless you're rebuilding hubs or pressing in bearings/headsets.

  20. #20
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    Should I be loyal to my LBS ((5'10'' 320lbs))

    I'm a very large proponent of supporting your local bike shop, mine has taken great care of me over the past year that I have been riding again. That was before I bought my road bike from them.


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  21. #21
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    Having also purchased a fuji recently, 1.7, I was pleasetly pleased how well my LBS supported me. The fuji isn't a high end piece. I don't personally feel that it's low end either but it's in definitely in the lower middle range.

    Within the first 50 miles, 4 rides, my rear wheel was way out of wack, the front derailer was touching the tire and I literally crushed the I beams inside the pedals (6-1, 260, strong rider).

    I took it in totally bummed with every intention of offloading this thing. But my LBS was awesome, they just wanted me to ride and be happy, and stay within my original budget. After all they're the guys that steered to this model, so they upgraded the rear spokes, dished and trued the wheel, installed a set of sweet specialized aluminum pedals and did a tune up from tip to tail, all within 24 hours, I added up the service and parts and it was over 300$... They did it for free.... Bike rides amazing, feels better than new and the rear wheel is so much more solid... I felt like I was rippin them off so I got them some Quiznos... And because of this experience they are my first stop for all things bike period.
    2014 Fugi 1.7 29er

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