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  1. #1
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    Should clydes look for longer travel bikes?

    Are the shorter travel bikes easier to bottom out for heavier riders? Is it better to look for longer travel bikes for this reason? Or does it not matter at all?

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Glide the Clyde's Avatar
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    Proper sag and suspension tuning are what's important whether a short travel or longer travel bike. Shoot, Clydes ride rigid bikes.
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  3. #3
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    I ride rigid and love it. My suspension fork is 80mm I think...no problems bottoming out.

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    All things held constant, shorter travel will bottom out more often.

  5. #5
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    will it be enough to notice?

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    Really depends on how and where you ride. I got 160mm of travel and once in a while bottom out because I'm an animal. If I rode a XC 100mm bike, I'd likely feel it more.

    On fire roads, 100mm is good and I'm 6'5" @ 320lbs. I can ride that same 100mm bike down the runs I take my other bikes, but wouldn't be going as fast.

  7. #7
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    Its all about set up. I ride a 100mm on my hard tail and only bottomed out twice so far. Both times were on smallish jump/drop that I probably shouldn't be catching air off of anyway lol, xc bike (though not exactly xc light)with my 265lb butt on it. Longer travel has nothing to do with ur size its for what kind of riding the bike is designed for.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doe Boy View Post
    All things held constant, shorter travel will bottom out more often.
    If by "all things held constant" you mean neither bike set up properly, then yes this is true. If the bike is set up correctly there is no correlation between travel and how frequently you bottom out. Unfortunately setting up suspension is a task that stumps many a ride and shop.

  9. #9
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    Yep, shouldn't matter if set up properly, in theory at least. I don't think my air suspension is as smooth as it could be if I could run lower psi, particularly my fork could use some more "small bump" compliance.

    But the thing I like about longer travel bikes is they usually have beefier components on them. I feel a lot more secure with 36mm fork stanchions, 20mm axle, strong cranks and bars, and all of that under me when I come in to a rock garden at my weight!
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
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  10. #10
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    From all the FS bikes I've had (back on HT...with 6" fork,lol) there's not much difference from the amount of travel as in the difference leverage ratios and how much of a noodle the frame is (hence why I'm back on HT).
    Honestly, I'd love a 100-130mm travel bike that doesn't twist in different directions.
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  11. #11
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    I had a 100mm fox on my last (first) bike and it was teeth rattlingly harsh with enough air to keep from bottoming out. It could be the trails I'm on but most people are on 100-130mm bikes here. I got a 140mm bike and I'm much happier.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSFA View Post
    From all the FS bikes I've had (back on HT...with 6" fork,lol) there's not much difference from the amount of travel as in the difference leverage ratios and how much of a noodle the frame is (hence why I'm back on HT).
    Honestly, I'd love a 100-130mm travel bike that doesn't twist in different directions.
    This guy is exactly right, and i love my 6x0" bike too.

    I'll add a bit. It's not the amount of travel that's important to clydes, it's the leverage ratio on the shock. A highly leveraged shock (say, average of more than ~2.5:1 wheel travel:shock movement) under a heavy guy will have a ton of air in the can and a damper that's working at the edge of it's range of adjustment. The air spring seals stick, the damper spikes, and it feels like crap. A custom tune can help a LOT, but it still won't fix the spring problems- still crap. These bikes are to be avoided.

    Shorter travel bikes will be built with lighter duty components, but when you consider that the design of a long travel bike lets you ride more aggressively with the same amount of skill... they end up being similarly flexible and durable. Similarly, they not designed to take as big of a hit before the suspension bottoms, but the design of the bike makes it so taking those big hits is a poor decision anyway. That's all assuming we're using travel to classify the intended use of the bike.

    For clydes i think the best bikes are the normal designs, but twerked to handle a bigger rider. Through-axle forks (or better- lowered larger forks), 8" front brakes (ideally a quad piston design), a sturdy frame with a low leverage ratio (that's designed for his style riding), a freeride wheelset, and a dh bar/stem combo will be a lot more fun to ride and should last longer. It won't even slow a clyde down since it's a small % of his weight and he'll be faster tracking through obstacles or when confidence matters.
    Hell is eternally climbing manzanita trail on your singlespeed.

  13. #13
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    Thanks Scottzg!
    Funny note on bottoming and suspension. A buddy of mine (non clyde) just got himself a Giant Reign (used but like new condition) so he's running 6" of travel F&R, I've got my Cotic BFe with Fox 36 6" up front, 0" steel rear and am in Super Clyde club. So we're railing done our local trail and smack a couple rock water bars going pretty quick. His 6" FS bike...double flats! My HT...All Happy! Something to be said for running tubeless true, (honestly thought I blew my front tire off the rim when I hit that) but it seems his full squish should have saved him.
    Bikes=Sanity

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