Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2

    Saddle suggestions

    6-3 - 280 pounder looking for a "Clyde" worthy saddle.
    Specialized Hard Rock, stock seat seems a little flimsy.
    Mostly gravel/paved county roads, some light hardpack trails.
    At 280 lbs, the weight of the saddle seems a moot point. Comfort and durability is what I'm after.
    Any suggestions?
    Last edited by SIMX; 04-13-2006 at 07:17 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: logbiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,819
    Quote Originally Posted by SIMX
    6-3 - 280 pounder looking for a "Clyde" worthy saddle.
    Specialized Hard Rock, stock seat seems a little flimsy.
    Mostly gravel/paved county roads, some light hardpack trails.
    At 280 lbs, the weight of the saddle seems a moot point. Comfort and durability is what I'm after.
    Any suggestions?
    saddles are very much subjective in terms of comfort and 'fit'. If your current saddle is comfortable, keep riding it... a bit of flex might be providing some comfort. Some saddle are designed to flex as well (this would be flex in the shell).
    I've only ever 'broken' a saddle (either bending a rail or popping it out of it's slot) by coming down real hard on the saddle.

    I've had no problems (weight wise, 'flimsyness'/bending rails) with WTB rocket, salsa zona tres (ti rail), or bontrager FS series. The WTB's various models have a large following.
    It's debateable whether ti rails are really stronger than cromo, I go for best bang for the buck in a saddle that I know fits me.
    These have all worked well for my butt & my weight (215-240), but there's a long list of saddles that didn't work so well for my butt fit wise.
    [SIZE=1][/SIZE]

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ray Dockrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    59
    My XC bike came with the WTB Speed V Sport and I love it. I just ordered another one to run on my road bike. It won't look to roadie, but I will be comfortable.

  4. #4
    Lacticacid head
    Reputation: Capt Tripps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    453
    I am close to size and weight, I honestly love my Brooks b-17 it is the most comfortable saddle I have ever had sometimes the old ways are the best. It is not light, but neither am I.
    www.lacticacidheads.com
    drop in, spin a spell~
    happy trails~

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hallin222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    649
    How about one of those new "I-beam" seats that basically use that in place of the traditional twin rail set-up? You'll need a new matching type of seatpost too. I'm not sure who makes them, but some Downhillers use them. They are supposed to be very strong although a little heavy.

    Good luck.

    Ian

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    21
    I ride on a Serfas RX saddle. Very comfortable and afffordable. I weigh 215-seems to be holding up real well.

  7. #7
    Double-metric mtb man
    Reputation: Psycho Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    4,483
    I'm in about the 240lb range and find a Serfas Reactive Gel works wonders for my long rides.

    It isn't any longer than a regular saddle, but it is wider...if you do a lot of riding where you're finding yourself behind the seat, it maybe isn't the best choice as you can get hung up a bit... but I've found it great otherwise.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  8. #8
    Noob
    Reputation: Downhillin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    141

    Pain?

    OK, so I know this might be a (no pun) touchy subject, but how do you determine if you HAVE the right saddle? Obviously you shouldn't feel any pain, it should be comfortable, but considering it's early in the season and I haven't been on my bike for a couple of months, there's that "break in" period again for my @ss that I'm sure I need.

    After the first couple of rides this season however, I've had some achy pain in my groin. The only way I can describe it is, that it feels like I'm still on my saddle when I’m walking around the house... uhhhh just making sure this is normal. Should I be looking for a more "appropriate" saddle for me? Or will probably work itself out once I get a few more rides under my gut?

    Yeah, I should have it all ironed out after a season and a half, but after my build, the saddle was the last piece I just tossed on to get rolling as I worked out everything else ($10 junker from the LBS)... and I’m looking to get a real, new one. Just thought I'd throw this out there...

    Cheers!
    MTB Blog

    There's a fine line between genius and insanity. I have erased this line.

  9. #9
    Gonna get better at this
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    32
    In addition to saddle selection, do not forget saddle positioning. Fore and aft, and importantly, with a slight decline, with the nose pointing down.

    Sometimes I am slow on the uptake, and I discovered that last weekend. Not long ago, I bought a wonderful Specialized saddle with a carbon pan, ti rails, and a deep groove for the naughty bits ($99 at Spokes, Etc).

    But I didn't feel any improvement in comfort. I had set it up as I had in my old, original saddle (rode on that one for 10 years!).

    On the trail, I was negotiating a log while climbing. Everything worked against me, my front wheel pointed to the sky, and I was going over. I clipped out, got both legs ready to catch myself, and my shorts hung up on the saddle. The saddle horn jammed itself exactly where I wish it hadn't. Tears in my eyes.

    When I caught my breath, first thing I did was dig out the allen wrench and put a forward dip in the saddle, pointing the horn more towards the dirt.

    Whatta difference that made! Wish I had done that a long time ago. Sometimes I think that if breathing took intelligence, I'd suffocate.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    20
    I have just ordered the Selle Italia Turbomatic 4 @ 350gr haven't tried it yet, but suposedly the integrated elastomers functione quite well making the saddle very comfortobale. BTW I am @ 215-220lbs, I 'll have more to say when I get to test it.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    61
    I will put a 2nd in for the Brooks B17. I don't really know if it is narrow enough for MTB riding but when my sit bones are 150MM apart then I really can't ride a conventional saddle made for people that weigh 140lbs and stand 5' 6". I put a B17 on my road bike and have my stem almost level with the tip of my saddle. I have to say that I'm more comfortable on a road bike that I ever have been as far as my rear. I'm to the point of not being such a weight weenie and putting a brooks saddle on the MTB.

    Having a super light bike is great for the 140lb-160lb rider but us clydes or near clydes are rough on equipment. We might as well go for dependable and comfortable.


    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Tripps
    I am close to size and weight, I honestly love my Brooks b-17 it is the most comfortable saddle I have ever had sometimes the old ways are the best. It is not light, but neither am I.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    175
    I've been on some generic "ARS" seat I picked up for ~$20. It's very comfortable and has held up to my abuse (I bent the rails on my specialized "body geometry" oem seat).


    Here's an ebay link to one: http://cgi.ebay.com/SUPER-SOFT-MENS-...QQcmdZViewItem

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •