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  1. #1
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    Rumblefish for superclyde?

    Hi all,

    I'm considering moving from a Wahoo hardtail to a new Rumblefish.
    As I'm over 350 pounds, I'm afraid it might not be up to the task. I don't ride much technical stuff - mostly XC really, but I'm thinking the Rumblefish might suit me (and my sore behind) better.

    Love to hear your thoughts on this. Specifically on which components will be up to the task, and which should I upgrade up front:
    • Rear shock
    • Rims
    • Frame (obviously can't upgrade that...)


    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    The issues with a FS bike are the leverage ratios. I ride a pivot mach 429. I weigh around 280 and put 170 psi in shock. My friend Ralphy weighs 240 and rides a hifi deluxe and he must put 225-240 psi in the shock for the bike to have the correct sag. I dont know the exact leverage ratio of the rumblefish, but if you have to match your shock psi to your weight you are gonna have troubles getting it that high. I am not trying to rain on your parade, but you may want to consider a bike with a different leverage ratio.
    Last edited by Adim_X; 05-12-2011 at 04:23 AM.

  3. #3
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    Is this something that can be solved with a stronger shock? If so, any recommendations?

  4. #4
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    I believe you could go to a coil spring shock. I don't truly know enough about levarage ratios to give you a full explanation of the mechanics of it. I am sure someone will chime in soon. What I am saying is that due to the suspension design differences between the rumblefish and pivot 429, you are required to put more air in the rumblefish at the same rider weight as compared to a pivot 429. I think most air shocks are going to have a limit of 275-300psi.

  5. #5
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    Rigid hardtail, that way you wont have to worry about suspension designs.

  6. #6
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    Already have a hardtail (and broke one before that).
    I was thinking a full suspension bike might actually be better for a clyde, as all that force is (hopefully) absorbed properly by a shock, instead of by the frame.

  7. #7
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    The problem is, shocks aren't designed for Clydes. Stuff tends to be designed for something like the 70th percentile ie from the 15th to the 85th percent in things like height and weight. Outside that bracket - where we live - there isn't much profit, so not much is made.

    You might be lucky with DH shocks, but it will probably be coil. Failing that, speak to a shock tuning company and see whether they can do something for you - not a cheap option but they will know whether it is possible.

  8. #8
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    Thanks. I think indeed a new full suspension bike + a custom shock would be too much for me. So the question becomes: Which 29" hardtail for a superclyde? I guess I'll move that to a new post...

  9. #9
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    Arms and legs provide more than enough suspension. Fat tires make it slightly cushier. If you stand up and let the bike float over obstacles you'll be smoother on equipment. Nothing will teach you to be a smoother rider than spending a few months on a completely rigid mountain bike. It's quite addicting and, in my opinion, every MTBer should keep one around just so they view suspension as a luxury and not a necessity.

    How tall are you? I'd definitely look into some of the really overbuilt hardtails (Chameleon, 5-0, Sovereign, TransAM, Mmmbop) if you've had issues breaking them in the past. Heavy guys need heavy duty equipment.

    I weigh a little less than you but dont sweat riding a 32lb hardtail, I know that I can huck it and drop it and it'll all handle my weight. Luckily there are a lot of guys going back to building burly 140-150mm hardtails so there are a lot of options out there.

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