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  1. #1
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    road worthy of a clyde?

    Ok first of all I am 5'11 285-290 Im fat no doubt about it. I plan on being able to get down to at least 230. I am looking at getting a road bike. I was wondering if this would be suitable for me and can I change things such as wheels, fork? I would also like to be able to switch to a drop bar yes i know it has MTB components and I am ok with switching and braking on the flat bar just want to the drop bar to be able to drop down a little or maybe add an aero bar for comfort. What are your opinoins?
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  2. #2
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    I <3 specialized. Lifetime frame warranty is sex. @ 290, your definitely going to be testing the hell out of that frame but, as long as you stay on top of routine maintenance and go in to it knowing that you might have to switch components out, I think you'll be happy as hell with it. That's my opinion though....Like i said, I <3 specialized.

    Also, put whatver bar you want on it...who cares what anyone else thinks, as long as it's what's comfortable and works for you.

  3. #3
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    I bust a spoke every 200-300 miles so a good roadie wheelset should be primary concern.
    funny tho, never busted a spoke on my mtb, nor a front spoke on my roadie.
    wonder if its just a crappy build. had a buddy mechanic build it up around a 105 hub.

    I wouldn't go below a 32 spoke count, even when you reach your weight goal.
    otherwise, go for it!

  4. #4
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    awsome thanks for the replies i was tginking i was on the right track wiyh this one but wanted to make sure i just am not comfortable with those paper thin rims and tires

  5. #5
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    take a look at cyclecross bikes.
    similar to roadies but have beefier tires.
    some of my roadie rides are on rough pavement (pavement so old and potholed its almost like gravel) the CX tires would be a bonus. I usually try to avoid roads like that but I do try to stay on roads with the least amount of cars, so its a toss up.

    been looking at this CX bike. performance house brand, entry level, but decently equipped for the $$

  6. #6
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    Ive got a Sirrus, and I weigh around 230 or so. I say go for it, awesome bikes Just take it easy while you drop weight. Avoid potholes and such, and make sure the wheels get properly tensioned and trued before you buy (I don't care myself, but I have the tools and enjoy wheel truing...) My 2009 Sirrus (base model) has decent looking wheels on it, Maybe you would want wider tires as well to help absorb shock, 32 or 35c would be a good start.

  7. #7
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    Road bike brifters are expensive to buy aftermarket, so if you want a drop bar bike, it's much more economical to get one up front rather than convert.

    Personally, I wish my road bike was a flat bar type as I almost never ride in the drops and would appreciate the MTB style cockpit more than the traditional style drop bar setup. YMMV.

    As for changing out the fork, why would you want to do that?

    The wheels should support you just fine. I have been up to 300lbs (currently 260lbs) and done fine with stock wheels. I also had a set of Performance house brand Korso wheels I got for $99 that had 20 bladed rear spokes and 16 in the front. I have hit over 53mph on those on some fairly rough pavement. I finally broke a spoke while JRA after five years of riding them. I decided not to push it with the 20 spoke wheel any longer and sold the wheelset to a friend that weighs under 200lbs and I'm back on the stock Mavic 33 rims with 32 spokes. I also had a Specialized Allez and never had issues with the stock wheels on that either.

    I have used 23c and 25c tires with no problems either. Currently on 23c Specialized All Conditions Armadillo tires and have not had a flat in the three years I have had them. They ride a little rougher, but the peace of mind is worth it in spades. Going down on pavement at 50mph+ is not something I'd ever wish on anyone.

  8. #8
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    From your post it's not clear what your long term goals are for your road bike. Maybe your just investigating getting back into road riding...

    I'm 6'5" and was ~290 about a year ago. I purchased a specialized Roubaix! I love the bike. I'm now ~208 and it fits me like a glove. It has a carbon frame, drops and the frame has Zertz inserts to take up the harshness of the road while still delivering a very laterally stiff frame.

    When I first started riding the bike felt "flexy" It was me loading the wheels. I was VERY careful about road surfaces. I still am! I'm very careful to ride "light" over any moderate road imperfection. A pot hole would be VERY bad! In one year of riding I "untrued" my wheels twice. The first was on a county trail that turned out into a rolling dirt and gravel parking lot used by truck. I wasn't very careful as I was racing daylight and untrued my rear wheel... My LBS repaired it under warranty. The second was on a group ride/event. Someone dropped their water bottle right in front of me. I had no room to dodge it and it skittered under my fully loaded rear wheel. It only "untrued" it. An hour in the bike shop and $20 later I was good as new!

    Whatever you do... Get fit for your bike! If you want drops get a bike with them. By adjusting the stem length and angle they can adjust your riding position to be more upright. As you get rid of the belly you'll want to ride the drops more if you like roadie riding. You can get refit later and adjust your bike w/o a big investment. As a condition of the sale of my road bike I told them they had to refit me when I dropped the weight. They did so! It was an easy thing for them to throw in because it's only an hour or so of labor...

    Hope this helps...

  9. #9
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    @dadtorbn;
    What you are talking about with the flex is exactly what I do not want. That is why I was against going with the skinny tires. I figured with the wider wheels and tires on the bike I OP would definatley more up my alley. My original reason for posting this was I will never get down to under 215 and thats pushing it unless I loose alot of muscle as well. So basically since the price was right on the sirrus I was thinking that as time goes on I can upgrade the wheels to a better wheel set, the fork to possibly a lighter one if I so desired and the reason for the drop bar is to make it more comfortable in the long haul because I dont know if you could run clip on aero bars. Never messed with a road bike before. Basically I want the best ratio of strength to weight as possible.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by motosig102
    @dadtorbn;
    What you are talking about with the flex is exactly what I do not want. That is why I was against going with the skinny tires. I figured with the wider wheels and tires on the bike I OP would definatley more up my alley. My original reason for posting this was I will never get down to under 215 and thats pushing it unless I loose alot of muscle as well. So basically since the price was right on the sirrus I was thinking that as time goes on I can upgrade the wheels to a better wheel set, the fork to possibly a lighter one if I so desired and the reason for the drop bar is to make it more comfortable in the long haul because I dont know if you could run clip on aero bars. Never messed with a road bike before. Basically I want the best ratio of strength to weight as possible.
    Fair enough... I hadn't been under 210 in almost 30 years! I thought I was "big boned" and would never get under...

    Anyhow, I think the most important thing for you in terms of wheel reliability will be getting a 3 cross spoke pattern on your rear wheel for sure and possibly on the front. The picture you have in the first post has just that. The radial spoke threading on the front wheel is likely what make it feel "flexy". However, the lateral stiffness was like no bike I have EVER ridden. If you've ridden a steel/CroMoly bike your entire life go test ride a carbon bike. Stand and crank! It's freaken amazing. All the pedal input gets transmitted into motive force!

    Good Luck! Buying a new bike is fun... If you're set a a specific bike shop then you can likely rent demo bikes of what you think you may buy to get extended rides in. Once you figure it out they should apply your demo fees to your bike purchase.

  11. #11
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    Like what jeffj said, road bike brake/shifters are expensive. even if you go with Sora your looking at about $175 and go upwards 6 bills from there.
    so you are better off buying a roadie with drop bars from the get-go.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whacked
    I bust a spoke every 200-300 miles so a good roadie wheelset should be primary concern.
    funny tho, never busted a spoke on my mtb, nor a front spoke on my roadie.
    wonder if its just a crappy build. had a buddy mechanic build it up around a 105 hub.
    MTB rims are thicker and smaller in diameter, allowing higher spoke tension. Also, road bike hubs are 130mm; MTB are 135mm, allowing for slightly less "dish", meaning more balanced tension left vs right. Even so, a spoke every 200-300 miles sounds like a symptom of a bad wheelbuild. There's things you can do design wise and build wise to avoid such immediate problems. For example, if he used straight gauge spokes on both sides in the rear ... that's bad. The left side should have thinner spokes then the right, because the tension is going to be lower. At this point, you need to replace ALL the spokes, because such regular breakage means they are all suffering metal fatigue. (Spokes on front wheels are rarely an issue unless you run disc brakes- no dish & no torque transmitted through spokes.)

    Most CX bikes run 135mm spacing in the back, using a MTB hub, and have heavierr rims than a road bike, allowing higher spoke tension. Not a bad option for a clyde road bike. Being able to run fatter tires is good too- if you are over 200 lbs, you want the option of running tires bigger than 28c.

  13. #13
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    hey just wanted to say thanks to everybody for the help and input. I am happy to say that I ended up buying my new bike today. The wife and I stopped by the local dealer just to see what they had found a bike well in my price range and took it home. Yes I know the components are average and blah blah blah but hey Im comfortable on it, its light weight, and I damn sure enjoyed ridding it today. I need to get a set of bar ends and remove some of the bs reflectorsand plastic plats for my clips but other than that its smooth sailing and ready to crossover and try the roadie side for a few Oh and the wife got her a new birthday present as well.
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  14. #14
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    Congrats on the bike purchase and good luck on the weight loss journey. Don't get discouraged if you can't bust out 10 miles trips on your first ride. It gets better week by week. Have fun.

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