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  1. #1
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    Road bike for fitness?

    Ok so 20 stone and looking for road bike to do commute on (20 miles max. each way) so I can get fitter to do my MTBR riding.

    How solid are the Spec. Roubaix for my kind of weight?

  2. #2
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    Consider a Tri-Cross or another cyclocross bike. The frames are built slightly stouter than a road bike, the brakes work WAY better than calipers, and there is plenty of room for fatter tires and fenders. No its not a true road bike, but unless your racing its a better Clydesdale bike for the road.

  3. #3
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    I don't know of any reason why the rubaix or tricross won't work, but both are really intended for racing and will have lighter (usually meaning more flexy and somewhat more fragile) frames to suit. If I were you I would get a touring bike. Touring bikes are built extra sturdy to carry loads and be super reliable for long distances.

    If you take any one of these bikes (road-sport, cyclocross, or touring) and put some good quality 700 X 25 (or so, 28s are also good) then the bike will roll as fast as most road racing bikes, yet still carry a rack and fenders and stand up to a 20 stone rider.
    "Newfoundland dogs are good to save children from drowning, but you must have a pond of water handy" - Josh Billings

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    I kinda had my mind set on a Carbon frame to knock out the road buzz.

    Not sure I have seen any carbon tourers?

  5. #5
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    Nope, you won't find any carbon tourers. Most touring bikes are steel. I personally (approx 16 stone) have an older (1989) Trek 420 that I've cleaned up and use for road riding. However, if you're really looking to do this for fitness, why not just throw some slicks on an old hardtail and ride that? I find myself prefering my HT to my road bike, and use it to commute on as well as trail ride.

  6. #6
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    Steel will cut down the road buzz as well or better than any carbon frame. The Trek 520 is a great production steel touring bike. Surly also makes a great touring bike called the Long Haul Trucker...its available as a complete or a frameset. If you want more of a cyclocross bike, Surly also makes the Cross Check in a complete bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pabrown
    I kinda had my mind set on a Carbon frame to knock out the road buzz.

    Not sure I have seen any carbon tourers?
    Road buzz is usually a product of stiff, tight geometry frame, and narrow high pessure tires. The advantage of touring (and CX and road-sport) bikes is the clearance for tires wider than 25mm. 28mm wide tires will be more comfortable, and, due to the better resistance to sidewall flex than narrow tires, as fast or faster under a big rider.

    I personally use 700 X 32 tires on my aluminum touring bike (major road buzz with skinny tires) and I can ride the super rough paved/gravel road to and from work without problems every day.

    Also, steel is often a good choice for bigger riders because of our ability to ssnap frames and a steel's ability to resist snapping.

    If you were looking into getting a carbon or other high end CX bike then you could consider getting a custom steel bike made to match your size, risding style, preferences, etc. That way there is no question about the frame's suitability for your use - tell the builder what you are looking for and see what he/she suggests.
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  8. #8
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    The Surly cross check will do ya fine, only 1000 complete to boot.

    I ride a Trek 1600, all aluminum frame. Its held up well, just needed to replace the stock wheels with something tougher, Mavic Aksium. Its faster than I need. I put some Specialized armordillos all condition on their, and they really smooth out the ride compared to racing tires.

  9. #9
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    if you're just using it for commuting, then I'd take a look into cyclocross bikes. That being said, I seem to recall that Cipo won the 'Roubaix' on a Specialized Roubaix. Cipo's a huge pro racer at 6'2"+ and 220lbs+ and the Roubaix is mostly cobblestone.

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    Ya....NO

    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr
    if you're just using it for commuting, then I'd take a look into cyclocross bikes. That being said, I seem to recall that Cipo won the 'Roubaix' on a Specialized Roubaix. Cipo's a huge pro racer at 6'2"+ and 220lbs+ and the Roubaix is mostly cobblestone.
    Cipo never won Paris-Roubaix and he never rode on a Roubaix as they were not in production when he rode on Specialized bikes (I know, I was a warranty manager for a large Specialized dealer at the time)

    Nice thought though

  11. #11
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    Thanks Guys
    Guess I'll go away and try some cyclocross & tourer bikes & see what I think

  12. #12
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    Go 'Cross!

    I'm 210 and commute on a Bianchi cross bike (Cross Concept) with beefier wheels/tires: 13.5 miles by road and 20 by rail trail. Works great for me, and was a great excuse to put another steed in the stable. It's also a good excuse to try out cross racing. I would definitely go cross bike over tourer. BTW, my bike's not full carbon; it's scandium with a carbon rear triangle. . . but 38c city/touring tires (Vittoria Randonneur) soak up ALL road buzz.

  13. #13
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    I use a Surly Karate Monkey as my road bike.

    I've got Mary bars and Schwalbe Big Apple 2.35s on it. No buzz.

    The KM is a great Superclyde road frame. In a pinch, you can throw some knobbies on it and it makes a pretty good mountain bike!

  14. #14
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    Hope My bad..

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Cipo never won Paris-Roubaix and he never rode on a Roubaix as they were not in production when he rode on Specialized bikes (I know, I was a warranty manager for a large Specialized dealer at the time)

    Nice thought though
    honest mistake, I was just repeating what our specialized rep told us at the time about the new cf roubaixs...for those who don't know, the important point is Mario Cipollini did ride specialized bikes and that he's one big dude--not the average skinny roadie.






  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr
    if you're just using it for commuting, then I'd take a look into cyclocross bikes. That being said, I seem to recall that Cipo won the 'Roubaix' on a Specialized Roubaix. Cipo's a huge pro racer at 6'2"+ and 220lbs+ and the Roubaix is mostly cobblestone.
    Cipollini weighed closer to 180 lbs during his career.

    Also, professional cyclists, especially those sponsored by a bike manufacturer, generally do not ride production bikes - usually custom bikes are built for them, often several to suit specific races and race types. Often the bikes used are not even made by the sponsoring manufacturer but by some other manufacturer to the rider's or team's specifications.

    Even if cipo was riding some bike that looked like a Rubaix, it would be very unlikely that it would be the same rubaix that you and I can buy.
    "Newfoundland dogs are good to save children from drowning, but you must have a pond of water handy" - Josh Billings

  16. #16
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    Easy, Tiger!

    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr
    Do they make full-body tiger-striped racing suits for us clydes?

  17. #17
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    not really

    Quote Originally Posted by TobyNobody
    Cipollini weighed closer to 180 lbs during his career.

    Also, professional cyclists, especially those sponsored by a bike manufacturer, generally do not ride production bikes - usually custom bikes are built for them, often several to suit specific races and race types. Often the bikes used are not even made by the sponsoring manufacturer but by some other manufacturer to the rider's or team's specifications.

    Even if cipo was riding some bike that looked like a Rubaix, it would be very unlikely that it would be the same rubaix that you and I can buy.
    I disagree. Most pro team bikes are indeed production models, however, often one year ahead of their release to the general public. Some TT bikes are exceptions, but you and I could buy just about any bike in the pro peloton. I cannot think of a single example where the frame is made by one company and labeled as something else. The same cannot be said for wheels and some components, however. Lots of teams are sponsored by one company, ie Eason, but the riders want Zipps, so, the team badges its Zipp wheels with Easton stickers.

  18. #18
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    surlys are great

    ... solid build, and reasonably priced. I have a steamroller, and it's super smooth. A friend rides a crosscheck, and I would definitely recommend it for heavier riders. He loaded it up as a touring bike, and it can hold some weight for sure.

  19. #19
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    i'm 6'1 @ 225 and ride a roubaix for road fitness and boy does it feel FUN Just don't go doing crazy stuff (that's what your mtb is for) and you'll be fine. I haven't had any issues at all and mine's an 06 model.

  20. #20
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    Cipo rode production

    Quote Originally Posted by Hors Categorie
    I disagree. Most pro team bikes are indeed production models, however, often one year ahead of their release to the general public. Some TT bikes are exceptions, but you and I could buy just about any bike in the pro peloton. I cannot think of a single example where the frame is made by one company and labeled as something else. The same cannot be said for wheels and some components, however. Lots of teams are sponsored by one company, ie Eason, but the riders want Zipps, so, the team badges its Zipp wheels with Easton stickers.
    It used to be that pro riders had custom bikes made by small manufacturers labeled something else (7-11 team rode on Serotta bikes labeled Huffy and Murry, Motorola rode on Caloi bikes made by Litespeed, etc) but those days are long gone. Cipo rode on a production S-Works E5 Aluminum frameset...no carbon in the frame at all (in the fork though). It looked a little something like this:


    Also, most riders who participate in Paris-Roubaix have their bikes "beefed up" with heavy duty wheels and parts well past the lightweight bikes Cipo would ride on flat stages. Think about George Hincapie...he snapped an aluminum steerer tube a couple of years ago in the race and he is similar in size to Cipo. A Paris-Roubaix bike is generally retired after just that one race because of how much of a beating the frame, fork, and components take.


  21. #21
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    There's a guy in our club with a Karate monkey. He has dropped bar ends on it. He races XC and short track on it (fully rigid, ouch) and tours and commutes with it. What I like about it is he has a nice wide mtb bar with mbt shifters and brakes but has the drops on there for when he really wants to lay down the rubber (he rips up the short track races with this setup). This may not be the best bike for you, but it is a good all around bike.

  22. #22
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    true

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    It used to be that pro riders had custom bikes made by small manufacturers labeled something else (7-11 team rode on Serotta bikes labeled Huffy and Murry, Motorola rode on Caloi bikes made by Litespeed, etc) but those days are long gone. Cipo rode on a production S-Works E5 Aluminum frameset...no carbon in the frame at all (in the fork though).
    Good point. Team bike sponsorship was a different animal in years past. I was definitely thinking of the current format. And you are right about some companies beefing up their Paris-Roubaix bikes. Although, didn't O’Grady win on a stock R3 this year? (Such a beautiful bike).

  23. #23
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    I just got an old '87 Schwinn World Sport bike to commute on. Its a 4130 chromoly double butted frame. Not shabby for a bike you can get for next to free. I really like the ride quality on the steel frame. its surprisingly smooth.

    Even as old and cheap as it was (i got it for free), its ten times more effecient than my hardtail mountain bike. I think i'm going to refinish it, but on a few newer parts, and maybe make a single speed commuter out of it.

    Its quite comparable to a Surly crosscheck frame, but w/ less clearance for big tires.

  24. #24
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    Actually not stock R3

    Quote Originally Posted by Hors Categorie
    Good point. Team bike sponsorship was a different animal in years past. I was definitely thinking of the current format. And you are right about some companies beefing up their Paris-Roubaix bikes. Although, didn't O’Grady win on a stock R3 this year? (Such a beautiful bike).
    Check out this article on O'Grady's winning bike from Cyclingnews.com

  25. #25
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    awesome

    Great article, thanks for the post. I read cyclingnews pretty religiously, so I'm not sure how I missed this one... Interesting that the changes over the stock frame are really just a matter of mud clearance and geometry, rather than strength and durability issues.

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